#1
Hey, at the moment i'm playing a Vintage VS6 which is gonna get completely overhauled once I get a new amp. Obviously, SG's are almost known as Rhythm guitars and I was really wondering why? In all honestly, lead work isn't the easiest thing ever when compared to some Les Pauls and RG's i've played but why does this difference occur?
#2
I've never thought of the SG as just a rhythm guitar. The upper fret access is better than on an LP imo. They're great for lead work.
#3
Quote by willT08
Hey, at the moment i'm playing a Vintage VS6 which is gonna get completely overhauled once I get a new amp. Obviously, SG's are almost known as Rhythm guitars and I was really wondering why? In all honestly, lead work isn't the easiest thing ever when compared to some Les Pauls and RG's i've played but why does this difference occur?



You can play lead on a SG or Les Paul just as good as any other instrument. Whoever told you that is full of sh*t.
#4
Well, no guitar really is designed for rhythm or lead. If you think other guitars are easier to play stuff on, then you might've chose the wrong guitar for you.
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#5
yea, i'd say sg is better than a les paul for lead. sgs and les pauls are not "shredders" but theres different kinds of lead playing besides that.
#6
the neck shape/profile of RG's are more suited for moving around fast
Imo Les Paul's are more middle of the road do anything guitars, same with SG's
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#7
Actually if anything, I know SGs more for lead playing. Same with any double cut design really. SGs are actually one of several guitars that I would never use for playing rhythm. Between Angus young, Tony Iommi, Leona Dopler, Robby Krieger and Eric Clapton, I really struggle to even imagine anyone who isn't a lead guitarist using an SG.

So, there you go. I will happily argue that the SG is much more a 'lead' guitar in the first place.
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#8
Quote by adambauman31
yea, i'd say sg is better than a les paul for lead. sgs and les pauls are not "shredders" but theres different kinds of lead playing besides that.


Ever heard of Buckethead? You can shred on an acoustic if your good enough.
#9
Quote by Matt420740
Ever heard of Buckethead? You can shred on an acoustic if your good enough.

I could shred on a tuba if i were good enough, but that isn't what this is about.

Some guitars are just better suited for faster playing than others regardless of personal ability.
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Last edited by justinb904 at Oct 15, 2009,
#10
Quote by Matt420740
You can play lead on a SG or Les Paul just as good as any other instrument. Whoever told you that is full of sh*t.

Read the thread.

Well, no guitar really is designed for rhythm or lead. If you think other guitars are easier to play stuff on, then you might've chose the wrong guitar for you.


No way, I love my guitar to death. Thinking about it, it may just be a bad setup or something on mine which is leading me to think this. The only other SG i've played was a nasty Tokai Ha, maybe when it's all set-up and overhauled I might love it even more. Can't wait now.
#11
Quote by justinb904

Some guitars are just better suited for faster playing than others regardless of personal ability.



Personal playing ability has EVERYTHING to do with it. You can't just pick up a guitar and magically go faster because as you say "its better suited for faster playing"
#12
Quote by Matt420740
Personal playing ability has EVERYTHING to do with it. You can't just pick up a guitar and magically go faster because as you say "its better suited for faster playing"

Not true IMO. Say you're guitar is some low-end Squier POS with action higher than the Sun, then you grab hold of a well-setup RG. I'm pretty sure you'd be able to move around the fretboard alot easier on the RG.
#13
Well, Angus Young for AC/DC plays lead on his Gibson SG. I couldn't imagine him with a Les Paul. I personally think Les Pauls are overrated and the SG has a better sound than any Les Paul I've played.
#14
Quote by willT08
Not true IMO. Say you're guitar is some low-end Squier POS with action higher than the Sun, then you grab hold of a well-setup RG. I'm pretty sure you'd be able to move around the fretboard alot easier on the RG.



In that situation of course. But say you have a nicely set up Les Paul, and a nicely set up Ibanez RG. An established player should be able to play the same on both of those instruments. Now the thin RG neck might be better suited for for some people. But that doesn't mean its faster.
#15
Quote by Matt420740
Personal playing ability has EVERYTHING to do with it. You can't just pick up a guitar and magically go faster because as you say "its better suited for faster playing"

Think what you want but I'd take a well setup slim neck through over a wide bolt on necked guitar with a chunky neck joint for shred any day. For me and many guitarists I personally know It's just more comfortable to play fast on thinner necks. It requires less vertical movement on the higher frets.





Disclaimer: Paul Gilbert's Fireman has a chunky bolt on neck and it reportedly will sustain until hell freezes over, you could play some awesome leads with that.
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Last edited by justinb904 at Oct 15, 2009,
#18
Quote by justinb904
Think what you want but I'd take a well setup slim neck through over a wide bolt on necked guitar with a chunky neck joint for shred any day.


I have an RG. I actually prefer my Schecter or Flying V, which have thicker necks. I feel like I have more control with the thick neck than I do with the Ibanez. But I guess thats just my preference more than anything. Everybodys different
#19
The player makes the guitar and you make your guitar do what you want. If you want it to play Rhythm, then it will, it you want it to play lead, then it will. Some guitars are just suited for certain styles than others, but that doesn't mean it's limited to just that style.
#20
Quote by willT08
Not true IMO. Say you're guitar is some low-end Squier POS with action higher than the Sun, then you grab hold of a well-setup RG. I'm pretty sure you'd be able to move around the fretboard alot easier on the RG.
I dunno about others, but Ibanez necks literally cripple my hands, they are so physically painful and stressing to use I can't play on them for any more than about a minute and a ahlf before I am forced to stop because of the immense pain I get in my hands and wrists when playing them.

On the other hand, I find Squier necks very comfortable. So no. It's all down to each person individually.

This is probably a good time to mention I do have a friend who has now developed crippling RSI in his left hand and can't even hold a pen with it now because he tried to learn guitar and his first guitar was an Ibanze RGsomething. His technique was fine, but the simple lack of support that slim necks suffer from crippled his relatively large hands. He is literally perminantly crippled from it.

Quote by justinb904
Think what you want but I'd take a well setup slim neck through over a wide bolt on necked guitar with a chunky neck joint for shred any day. For me and many guitarists I personally know It's just more comfortable to play fast on thinner necks.
Just to expand on this and on my above statement; I find Ibanez necks cripplingly painful, as I have said. Squier/Fender necks are manageable. However the only neck I can actually play ''quickly'' on is my main LP's neck, which is a shade under an inch thick.

So there you go.

It requires less vertical movement on the higher frets.
That argument could be applied to a neck which is thinner (width-wise) or flatter, but not slimmer. A slimmer neck simply gives you easier access if your hands are on the smaller side, as there is less wood to grip.
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#21
Quote by MrFlibble
I dunno about others, but Ibanez necks literally cripple my hands, they are so physically painful and stressing to use I can't play on them for any more than about a minute and a ahlf before I am forced to stop because of the immense pain I get in my hands and wrists when playing them.

On the other hand, I find Squier necks very comfortable. So no. It's all down to each person individually.

This is probably a good time to mention I do have a friend who has now developed crippling RSI in his left hand and can't even hold a pen with it now because he tried to learn guitar and his first guitar was an Ibanze RGsomething. His technique was fine, but the simple lack of support that slim necks suffer from crippled his relatively large hands. He is literally perminantly crippled from it.

Just to expand on this and on my above statement; I find Ibanez necks cripplingly painful, as I have said. Squier/Fender necks are manageable. However the only neck I can actually play ''quickly'' on is my main LP's neck, which is a shade under an inch thick.

So there you go.

That argument could be applied to a neck which is thinner (width-wise) or flatter, but not slimmer. A slimmer neck simply gives you easier access if your hands are on the smaller side, as there is less wood to grip.


I agree with Flibble, I literally cannot play as good on ibanez or other slim necks as I can on a Fender or Gibson. Thick necks just suit my big hands. No guitar is 'faster' than another unless it's built to play itself like those pianos that play themselves. It's up to the player. Also, while playing a scalloped fretboard doesn't make you faster while on that fretboard, I think in theory it'd make you faster on necks that are not scalloped, as you learned to not use as much pressure when using the scalloped. That's off topic though.
#22
Personally, I prefer 25.5" scale guitars for lead work. An SG with its better upper fret access would be better than an LP for some lead but I would personally not pick any Gibson or 24.75" scale guitar.