#1
For my music theory class, I have to write a march on piano. It only has to be 16 measures, but I'm kinda stuck. I'm in C, using mostly C, F, and G chords in the bass, but what makes a march a march? I guess I'm actually more stuck on the melody line.
#2
Pretty much you just have to make the cheesiest trumpet fanfare imaginable, and then put bad woodwind and euphonium counter melodies over it. Thats all there is to marches. Oh, plus the bad trio and the embarrassingly stereotypical break strain.

Can you tell I dont like marches?
#3
Quote by me_llamo_juan
For my music theory class, I have to write a march on piano. It only has to be 16 measures, but I'm kinda stuck. I'm in C, using mostly C, F, and G chords in the bass, but what makes a march a march? I guess I'm actually more stuck on the melody line.


Marches consist of a fanfare, a first strain (usually repeated), a second strain (usually repeated), a dogfight, and a trio.
#5
I've given you the ingredients. Listen to something by John Philip Sousa (the master of marches), and look up what those sections mean. We can't do all your work for you.
#6
Another component: They are often in cut time, giving them that oom-pah sound.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


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