#1
Srry if this is stickied or something, I didn't see one...

I have started a 13-year old classic rock band, and I want to get a gig. My uncle is a professional musician, and I asked him, but everywhere he plays are bars where only people 18 and over are allowed in. How do I find a good place to play?

Again, I didn't see a post that had this, but if there is I'm sorry
Call me Andrew. It's my name.

Quote by theogonia777
i fond God too, man! i sat next to him on the bus once. he told be the meaning of life and then gave me a pretzel. i can't remember what the meaning of live was, but it was a good pretzel, man!
#2
Google reveals this list of places for underage peoples, some of which would be appropriate to ask if you can have a set;

http://atlanta.creativeloafing.com/gyrobase/a_large_helping_of_fun_for_the_underage_crowd/Content?oid=994299

Otherwise, as your uncle is already a professional musician, he obviously would have contacts in the area to set you up with another place, if he/your parents were in the pub at the time.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#4
Look around in your nearest downtown area, idk where you live, for restaurants that do live music at night. It seems like most restaurants like classic rock cover bands, with maybe a few originals thrown in. If your band is pretty good, then Im sure you guys could play at restaurants. And with your uncle being a pro, he should have some area contacts who run places where you could play. Or pull some strings so that you could.
#5
In all honesty, you might well be the reincarnation of Jimi Hendrix but you'd still struggle to be taken seriously at age 13.
Unless your band is absolutely staggeringly sh*t hot, you're not likely to get any really good gigs for a few years.

Apart from anything else, you have to think from an audience perspective. Usually, young musicians aren't very good on their instruments. But we'll assume, for the sake of argument you guys are. That doesn't matter, because at the end of the day a 13-year old's voice just doesn't tend to work for rock music. And most of all, the lyrics can sound very disconcerting coming from someone who's almost certainly never experienced most of the things the songs are written about.


For the time being stick to friends' parties, under-18s band nights, jam nights, and if all else fails, putting on your own shows. It might not be what you want to be doing right now, but it means by the time you start hitting the better venues when you're older, you'll have years of practice and experience under your belts and will be ready for anything.
#6
The party scene is always a great place to try and find gigs. Especially seeing as you're not playing a more obscure genre, like Viking Metal or whatever. There's not too many people out there that don't enjoy a bit of classic rock. Also, try and find other bands in your area around your age, and ask them about where they've been playing, etc.

Like kyle62 mentioned, putting on your own shows is always an option. This isn't easy, but if you have a dedicated fan-base, you should be alright. Just get your friends to invite their friends, and get them to invite their friends, and so on.
#8
Quote by koslack
Just play at your school. That's how pretty much every musician I know got started back in the day. Lunch time concerts.

Good advice, although one problem - there's only a small minority of schoolkids interested in classic rock these days! It's all "_____-core" at the moment
#9
Quote by kyle62
Good advice, although one problem - there's only a small minority of schoolkids interested in classic rock these days! It's all "_____-core" at the moment



I hate it when people use this excuse. What if The Beatles decided not to come to the U.S. because kids here were only listening to the Supremes, and crappy surf music?

Who cares if kids only listen to core? Kids love live music , period. Putting on a great show is the best way to get new fans or convert people to the genre. We should be convincing the OP to start playing shows at school no matter WTF his peers listen to. Start a revolution!
Last edited by drewfromutah at Oct 17, 2009,
#10
Quote by drewfromutah
I hate it when people use this excuse. What if The Beatles decided not to come to the U.S. because kids here were only listening to the Supremes, and crappy surf music?

Who cares if kids only listen to core? Kids love live music , period. Putting on a great show is the best way to get new fans or convert people to the genre. We should be convincing the OP to start playing shows at school no matter WTF his peers listen to. Start a revolution!


this is 100% true!

as for your question my band (also a young band who plays classic rock) got our first gig by talking to our music teachers who play around locally and they setup us up with a few places to play

besides that you also got your uncle which helps even more because most bars will still let you play even if your underaged

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#11
Quote by kyle62
Good advice, although one problem - there's only a small minority of schoolkids interested in classic rock these days! It's all "_____-core" at the moment



I know, isn't it awful how the vast majority of people can be completely pigeonholed, like they only listen to one extremely specific genre of music?

I have yet to meet somebody, of any age, who cannot appreciate classic rock on some level. I was interviewing a former gang member the other day, he was flipping through my mp3 player as we were getting started, saw Led Zep and the Rolling Stones, and said something to the effect of 'We didn't listen to this stuff in my neighbourhood growing up, but this is some really good music.' This, coming from a guy who lived the quintessential gangsta life. The lesson: don't stereotype, people will constantly surprise you.
#12
Quote by kyle62
In all honesty, you might well be the reincarnation of Jimi Hendrix but you'd still struggle to be taken seriously at age 13.
Unless your band is absolutely staggeringly sh*t hot, you're not likely to get any really good gigs for a few years.

Apart from anything else, you have to think from an audience perspective. Usually, young musicians aren't very good on their instruments. But we'll assume, for the sake of argument you guys are. That doesn't matter, because at the end of the day a 13-year old's voice just doesn't tend to work for rock music. And most of all, the lyrics can sound very disconcerting coming from someone who's almost certainly never experienced most of the things the songs are written about.


For the time being stick to friends' parties, under-18s band nights, jam nights, and if all else fails, putting on your own shows. It might not be what you want to be doing right now, but it means by the time you start hitting the better venues when you're older, you'll have years of practice and experience under your belts and will be ready for anything.


^ This is truth. The reality is, no one wants to hire a 13 year old. It's just, you're 13. They don't want someone so young. It just doesn't work. I think you're best shot at getting noticed is looking for music festivals dedicated to up and coming bands. For example, here in Hong Kong, we have "Jam" which is a big festival for local bands to play in, and there's "Picnic in the Park" same thing.