#1
my question is not on what modes are blah blah blah I know all that what I want to know is for instance staying within the same pattern in the same position how would I go about changing the tonal orientation to go from some basic major scale into a mode ? would it be something as small as hitting the target note more ? or is their more to it then that....whatever the case may be its got me stumped
#2
As simply put as possible, think of the key you are in and change the note you are centering around. If you are in C and keep coming back to D, then you are Dorian, and so on. Scale wise, play the key of C but go from D to D rather than C to C, and that is Dorian, for example.
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#3
That doesn't work if you're in a key. you need to change the backing itself if you want to start using modes in a traditional key-based composition.
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#4
but how would I do that to get the effect that I want =3 I guess my improvs tend to sound the same scale wise cuz I dont have a backing track then ?
#5
Quote by Alucard33592
but how would I do that to get the effect that I want =3 I guess my improvs tend to sound the same scale wise cuz I dont have a backing track then ?


Well yes, it's quite difficult to make an unaccompanied solo sound "different" to any other one you play.
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#6
ok =3 I guess ill start trying to record some stuff then I have reaper it came with my peavy vypyr amp havent tried using it yet but I guess itll be fun for experimenting
#7
somebody please help me

if i play e phyrgian scale over A-minor chord, is it e phyrgian or just a-minor scale, cuz the notes are same.
do i have to play e minor chord at background if i play e phyrgian scale to make
e- phyrgian sound?
#8
Yes, it's just A minor if you paly it over an A minor chord.
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#9
You don't change modes within a set scale over a backing track, unless there's a key change.

For example, if you are using the C major scale to solo over a C major chord progression, you will be using C Ionian no matter what. It doesn't matter if you accent the hell out of the D note, it's STILL C Ionian and not D Dorian. But as soon as there's a key change from C to D major, and you are still using the C major scale, you are now actually playing D Dorian.

You can change modes over a single-key chord progression using different modes of the SAME KEY (i.e. C Ionian, C Dorian, C Phrygian, etc.) as long as the chords of that progression allow it. What does that mean? Well, certain modes don't work well over certain chords. You can't play C Phrygian over a C major chord because the C major chord contains a natural E note while C Phrygian contains an Eb.

An easy way to learn to apply modes is to create "ambiguous" chord progressions. The very easiest way to learn is with Lydian mode; the only thing separating it from the major scale is the #4. C Lydian is derived from G major, giving you C-D-E-F#-G-A-B. So all you have to do is write a C major chord progression that doesn't use any chords which contain F/F# at all and you can use either C Ionian or C Lydian.

Using only simple chords, that leaves you with C major, E minor, G major, and A minor. Any progression using only these chords can be used as a backing track for either the C major scale or the C Lydian mode.
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Last edited by philipp122 at Oct 17, 2009,
#10
Quote by ominous24
As simply put as possible, think of the key you are in and change the note you are centering around. If you are in C and keep coming back to D, then you are Dorian, and so on. Scale wise, play the key of C but go from D to D rather than C to C, and that is Dorian, for example.


Sorry, but I have to dissagree.

If you want to change the "tonal orientation" by playing lead guitar, you wouldn't be changing the root note- that would be the job of the bass player/rhythm guitarist.

If you want to change the scale you need to play the scale tones of the mode you want OVER THE SAME ROOT NOTE. For example, if you are playing over a C major chord you wouldn't hit a D to imply dorian (i.e. the second), you would hit the minor third and/or major 6th (i.e. Eb or A) because these are the notes that make dorian sound "dorian" as opposed to any other scale (Dorian scale= 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7).

As it happens, playing C Dorian over a C major chord isn't always a great idea (the thirds will clash)

Its better to hit the sharp 4 (F#) to imply lydian (1 2 3 #4 5 6 7), or the flat 7 (Bb) to imply mixolydian (1 2 3 4 5 6 b7), you could also hit the flat 2nd (Db) and the flat 7 (Bb) to imply C phrygian dominant (1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7)...the list goes on...

I hope this makes sense? Sorry if this isn't what you were asking, but from what I understood of your question it hasn't been answered by previous posts...

...unless I've missed something, in which case ignore this

Oh yeh, and you can't use the same pattern over the same chords and have it as a different mode, that's just impossible!
#12
thank u guys, i appreciate a lot
i want to write my question again
if i play
lead- a-minor scale but start on e note and end on e note
rhythm- a minor chord
am i playing e phyrgian or just a minor scale?
i love this playing very much and i want to know what i am playing

i think i am playing e-phyrgian cuz i am phrasing on e note of a minor scale, and any chord of a minor scale can fit on e-phyrgian . am i right?
#13
Quote by user_r
thank u guys, i appreciate a lot
i want to write my question again
if i play
lead- a-minor scale but start on e note and end on e note
rhythm- a minor chord
am i playing e phyrgian or just a minor scale?
i love this playing very much and i want to know what i am playing

i think i am playing e-phyrgian cuz i am phrasing on e note of a minor scale, and any chord of a minor scale can fit on e-phyrgian . am i right?


No. If you are playing the notes of an A minor scale over an A minor backing, you are playing an A minor scale. It doesn't matter that you phrase on the e note when doing it.
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#14
thanks for the info I guess that kinda answers my question now all I need to make is a backing track and start experimenting