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#1
I read in a magazine I bought recently about a guy who works as a session musician who says that playing Guitar Hero greatly improved his guitar playing, mainly his timing, as long as he played this as well as practicing.
Opinions?
For every action, there is an equal and opposite criticism.
#2
Pile Of Wank not helpful at all, although when I used to do guitar hero (aged 10) it was the first time I'd heard the Rolling Stones etc.
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#3
I find that after a good session of guitar hero my hands are warmed up greatly. I usually play alot better when I did guitar hero beforehand.
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#4
I could actually see it helping timing and for those who say it cannot help your timing is retarded. Timing can be improved many different ways without your instrument. It is no different then a drummer practicing timing on a pad.
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#5
Quote by Will-kun
I find that after a good session of guitar hero my hands are warmed up greatly. I usually play alot better when I did guitar hero beforehand.


ya me too
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#6
He could probably have just improved his timing playing a real guitar to a CD ... and also his dexterity at the same time. And this is coming from someone with a major addiction to GH/RB.
#7
For some reason guitar hero makes me have worse timing. It's frustrating when I can play a song easily in real life but can't play it at all on GH. And sometime's they'll omit notes and I habitually try to play them and it marks it as a mistake. But thet's just me. To each his own
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#8
No.
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#9
The only benefit I can see is having your finger warmed up. It's not going to help with timing as in reality you don't have a visual aide, if anything it could even be bad for new players.
#10
Quote by pwrmax
He could probably have just improved his timing playing a real guitar to a CD ... and also his dexterity at the same time. And this is coming from someone with a major addiction to GH/RB.


To be fair though, I play guitar to music on my laptop all the time, and my time is pretty awful for someone who has been playing for nearly five years.
For every action, there is an equal and opposite criticism.
#11
Quote by matttt
To be fair though, I play guitar to music on my laptop all the time, and my time is pretty awful for someone who has been playing for nearly five years.

Then use a metronome.
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#12
Its good for a warm up and just fun....

I can play Dragon Force on Expert and its a blast, but if I try playing it in real life its really not as fun.
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#13
guitar hero does not=good guitarist.
it=person with 5000 hours of wasted time
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#14
I see no reason why it would help your timing at all. Your timing can be way off on Guitar Hero, and it'll still count the notes, whereas on guitar, it's really noticeable if your timing is off even a little bit.
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#15
Quote by matttt
I read in a magazine I bought recently about a guy who works as a session musician who says that playing Guitar Hero greatly improved his guitar playing, mainly his timing, as long as he played this as well as practicing.
Opinions?



You wanna get good at guitar?.... play guitar. it's that simple.

question to consider..... If you're looking for ways to get better at guitar, by avoiding playing the guitar, how much do you really like playing guitar? People don't generally avoid things they like doing. Worth thinking about.

Quote by Will-kun
I find that after a good session of guitar hero my hands are warmed up greatly. I usually play alot better when I did guitar hero beforehand.


Do you think that your hands would be just as warmed up after a good session of playing a real guitar?
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Oct 16, 2009,
#16
I'd say it could improve his timung a little bit, but nothing compares to playing an actual guitar
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#17
It's not going to help one bit as nothing you do remotely relates to actually playing the guitar.

However, it's just about the only way to get people to pay for music these days
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#19
it may well be a good warm up. there are plenty of ways to practice technique without an instrument (as long as they do not interfere with actually playing your instrument). For example, the brass professor at my college has me practice inhaling through a cutaway of a PVC pipe to help me breathe properly and practice buzzing my lips with and without a mouthpeice (no horn) to help with euphonium before i even begin to practice. As a guitarist, i do all manner of stretches and dexterity excersizes before i play. moreover, it is arguable that playing a bit of guitar hero is more musical then playing chromatic excersizes (particularly the standard 1-2-3-4 up all 6 strings) because you are playing along with real music, not playing unmusical technical excersizes with a metronome. But scales--not boxes (the major scale, minor scales, and commonly used modes) are by far the best way to buld technique.
#20
Quote by tehREALcaptain
But scales--not boxes (the major scale, minor scales, and commonly used modes) are by far the best way to buld technique.


I would say that playing actual music is the best way to build technique.


regarding your anti-box statement.....

If you're playing a scale, it can be seen as a pattern on the neck, whether you choose to recognize it or not. Choosing to recognize any helpful visual aid in no way undermines your ability to understand the concept that it represents. If anything, it reinforces your understanding. Not something to demonize IMO.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Oct 16, 2009,
#21
it only really helps if your already good at it. playing real fast songs help build up the right muscles so you can play more intense songs with more ease. i dont see how it could improve your skills at all though
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#22
Quote by jbswreckfest
it only really helps if your already good at it. playing real fast songs help build up the right muscles so you can play more intense songs with more ease. i dont see how it could improve your skills at all though


The real question is, what are the benefits, that couldn't be gained by just playing an actual guitar?
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#25
It can help, to a certain extent. Coordination/dexterity mostly. But playing guitar would help much more.
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#26
There is nothing guitar hero can possibly do for you that a real guitar + a metronome couldn't do 10x better.

End of story.
#27
Quote by GuitarMunky
I would say that playing actual music is the best way to build technique.


regarding your anti-box statement.....

If you're playing a scale, it can be seen as a pattern on the neck, whether you choose to recognize it or not. Choosing to recognize any helpful visual aid in no way undermines your ability to understand the concept that it represents. If anything, it reinforces your understanding. Not something to demonize IMO.


Lol, finally someone gets it. Scales are collections of notes...which happen to be found in patterns on your instrument. If anything, the way western music works, it was made so that things COULD be looked at as patterns.
Last edited by tubatom868686 at Oct 16, 2009,
#28
^^^ But the problem is, some people get stuck in the habit of ONLY seeing them as little boxes, not patterns that reoccur all over the neck.
#29
Quote by timeconsumer09
There is nothing guitar hero can possibly do for you that a real guitar + a metronome couldn't do 10x better.

End of story.


Well, I think the point here isn't that it's better than guitar, but that it can help, even if just a little bit. A lot of people don't/can't just spend all their free time playing and practicing real guitar. Having another hobby that could help guitar playing is a great concept. I mean, people already do finger exercises in the air or on a desk while watching TV or something else, why not treat Guitar Hero like that?
#30
everyone saying it can help with timing... no, it won't. guitar hero will let notes slip through that were early or late by a good margin.

more proof: I have a friend that can play guitar hero on expert fairly well (not really good, but he can play that game) but whenever I'm playing the game and he's sitting there watching he'll hum the notes completely off time, I've also seem him playing "air drums" on his leg while riding on the guitar listening to music, and again his timing is WAY off.

how is it that he has such bad timing but yet he can still play GH on expert?


edit:
Quote by timeconsumer09
^^^ But the problem is, some people get stuck in the habit of ONLY seeing them as little boxes, not patterns that reoccur all over the neck.



some people think anchoring is fine, some people play a different mode over every chord, some people also think its funny to blow pot smoke into a babies face.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Oct 17, 2009,
#31
Quote by GuerillaGorilla
Well, I think the point here isn't that it's better than guitar, but that it can help, even if just a little bit. A lot of people don't/can't just spend all their free time playing and practicing real guitar. Having another hobby that could help guitar playing is a great concept. I mean, people already do finger exercises in the air or on a desk while watching TV or something else, why not treat Guitar Hero like that?


I can understand finger exercises on a desk... but if you have enough free time to play guitar hero solely for practice for real guitar... play the real guitar.

Quote by The4thHorsemen
some people think anchoring is fine, some people play a different mode over every chord, some people also think its funny to blow pot smoke into a babies face.


And this has what to do with my post? Thinking of scales in terms of ONLY a little box and not seeing that the pattern of this 'box' repeats all around the neck can do nothing but hinder you and make your playing stale. Some people get by with anchoring. This is a physical aspect of playing that is widely debated, but it doesn't restrict your note choice. Different modes over every chord? Sure, some people do it. So what? Again, this doesn't limit your note choice/overall expressive capabilities.
Last edited by timeconsumer09 at Oct 17, 2009,
#32
Quote by timeconsumer09
And this has what to do with my post? Thinking of scales in terms of ONLY a little box and not seeing that the pattern of this 'box' repeats all around the neck can do nothing but hinder you and make your playing stale. Some people get by with anchoring. This is a physical aspect of playing that is widely debated, but it doesn't restrict your note choice. Different modes over every chord? Sure, some people do it. So what? Again, this doesn't limit your note choice/overall expressive capabilities.



it has everything to do with your post. you said some people just see it as a pattern that you're implying people shouldn't because "some people get stuck in the habit of ONLY seeing them as little boxes, not patterns that reoccur all over the neck." (you're obviously talking about people that just run through the shapes and calling it a solo)

which is stupid. just because some people are going about it wrong doesn't mean that nobody should learn the patterns at all.

edit: my point was, some people may be doing it wrong, but that doesn't mean everyone is.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Oct 17, 2009,
#33
I don't see how it'd help with timing. You've still got to hold a note on guitar for an exact duration, which is completely different from holding a note on a game. It feels different. Playing a scale at 60bpm and making sure you A) Hold the note for the exact amount of time required and B) Strike the note exactly on the beat, is the only way to play in time. Obviously this spills over onto triplets, sextuplets, 8ths etc. How this could be properly achieved from GH is beyond me.
#34
Quote by GuerillaGorilla
Well, I think the point here isn't that it's better than guitar, but that it can help, even if just a little bit. A lot of people don't/can't just spend all their free time playing and practicing real guitar. Having another hobby that could help guitar playing is a great concept. I mean, people already do finger exercises in the air or on a desk while watching TV or something else, why not treat Guitar Hero like that?

It's not going to help at all, not remotely, because playing guitar hero is nothing like playing the guitar.
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#35
For me, Guitar Hero wasn't a game, it was a tool. Mostly for ear training, witch it definitely improved. Ironically, i'd just sit with my guitar and go into practice mode. You'd get to hear the individual sections of every song on the game witch means your gonna have to use your ears. It's not like looking at a tab sheet, there's no counting up the neck... Just listen. imo, Guitar Hero makes it fun to learn songs that at the end of the day will make you a better guitar player, at least it did for me. Oh and btw, i've only owned GH2 and 3 so everything i've said is based on that.
#36
Quote by Alkaline 64
For me, Guitar Hero wasn't a game, it was a tool. Mostly for ear training, witch it definitely improved. Ironically, i'd just sit with my guitar and go into practice mode. You'd get to hear the individual sections of every song on the game witch means your gonna have to use your ears. It's not like looking at a tab sheet, there's no counting up the neck... Just listen. imo, Guitar Hero makes it fun to learn songs that at the end of the day will make you a better guitar player, at least it did for me. Oh and btw, i've only owned GH2 and 3 so everything i've said is based on that.


This makes me think youve never done real ear training
#37
I played guitar for about 7 years before Guitar Hero came out. I've played it a couple of times. It's nothing like a real guitar. It doesn't feel like a guitar.

The person interviewed was probably sponsored by Guitar Hero.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#38
It will help you with rhythm, depending on how you play it. I played Guitar Hero competitively (on ScoreHero) for a year or two and it definitely helped develop the rhythm I have now. But, you have to consider that at the level I was at, it wasn't about just passing, it was about hitting every note. While yes, the timing window is quite lenient in Guitar Hero 3, Guitar Hero 2 and 1 are pretty tight. Not to mention the fact that if you cannot comprehend the rhythm of a series of fast notes coming at you, you won't hit them all. End of story. If it wasn't for Guitar Hero, I wouldn't have the rhythmic skills I have now. Could I have done all of this with a guitar and a metronome? Totally, but it wouldn't be as fun. Playing a video game competitively will get you a few odd looks, but in the end it's a hell of am experience.
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#39
Quote by tubatom868686
This makes me think youve never done real ear training


Depends on what you think "real ear training is".

Seriously, if you try listening to something then try to recreate it on an instrument it's ear training...
#40
Quote by timeconsumer09
^^^ But the problem is, some people get stuck in the habit of ONLY seeing them as little boxes, not patterns that reoccur all over the neck.


That's a personal problem, not a problem with the shapes themselves.

Quote by Eastwinn
It will help you with rhythm, depending on how you play it. I played Guitar Hero competitively (on ScoreHero) for a year or two and it definitely helped develop the rhythm I have now. But, you have to consider that at the level I was at, it wasn't about just passing, it was about hitting every note. While yes, the timing window is quite lenient in Guitar Hero 3, Guitar Hero 2 and 1 are pretty tight. Not to mention the fact that if you cannot comprehend the rhythm of a series of fast notes coming at you, you won't hit them all. End of story. If it wasn't for Guitar Hero, I wouldn't have the rhythmic skills I have now. Could I have done all of this with a guitar and a metronome? Totally, but it wouldn't be as fun. Playing a video game competitively will get you a few odd looks, but in the end it's a hell of am experience.


So playing music on an actual guitar isn't as fun for you as pushing buttons on a Guitar Hero controller?

I suppose if your not all that into playing guitar, you could take that route. Ultimately though, what's the point?
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Oct 17, 2009,
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