#1
I am an aspiring musician, unfortunately to be a great musician you must play by ear. You can play the instrument great but you will always be limited by your ability to hear and compose your own stuff. Did hearing songs and melodies by ear come naturally to you or did it require a lot of effort and time? I am hoping the latter because I do not have much natural hearing ability but I am working like a slave to have a good sense of relative pitch. Thanks for any response!
#2
its a combination of both most people have a certain amount of natural ability, but at the same time you still have to work at it. it also depends how well you know your instrument. In the end it boils down to how much time and work you want to put into practicing cause you can only get better

best of luck
#4
it took me about 3 years before i could perfectly play melodies by ear after just hearing them. the way i did it was to listen to songs on the radio, songs with prominent melodies and to just play along and try to match the notes up correctly. i have no innate abilities with pitch, nothing came naturally to me except the desire to get better so keep working at it. i am a firm believer that music is not just something you're born into, practice makes perfect so keep it up man.
#5
Ear ability alone doesn't make anyone a great musician. Don't get me wrong, its a valuable and difficult skill, but music isn't one sided. Theory and technique, among other things, are equally important. Composing your own music is a hundred times easier with theory knowledge. But anyway, to answer your question.
Picking out notes in a melody never came naturally to me, just practice and practice. I started with trying to find the melodies in songs by the beatles. Their stuff is mostly easy and their melodies are really prominent.
#7
I have another question now. Would it be beneficial to learn intervals AND functional pitch recognition? Or would it be better to focus on intervals?
Last edited by Xnipes at Oct 16, 2009,
#8
Playing by ear does not come naturally. In my opinion, this is the biggest misunderstanding issue when it comes to music. What makes it look like this is that different people have different learning speeds. I believe no one can identify intervals if they're exposed to music a few days ago. 'Practice' is the key thing. Some people need a little practice. Some need more. It doesn't matter where the limit for 'more' is. All you have to do is 'practice' and find out where your limit is to break into the playing-by-ear group.

Quote by Xnipes
I have another question now. Would it be beneficial to learn intervals AND functional pitch recognition? Or would it be better to focus on intervals?


Focus on intervals, starting from different roots. Don't think about the perfect-ear yet.
Last edited by YA89 at Oct 17, 2009,
#9
wew,, what could I say... your problem is exactly the same as mine...