#1
As the Title says..Barre Chords without the Barre....

Can it be done ? example the F Chord but without the Barre.

Alot of us newer players have difficulty with Barre Chords....one may sound
great the next really bad......is there a way to create the chord without the Barre ?

I saw one guy play the F without barring that sounded just like the F barre chord ?
Dont know how , couldnt tell ya...thats why i am asking ?

Whats the trick to barre chords or Not barre chords as it were ?

I know practice makes perfect....but 1 out of 10 isnt a good percentage after awhile it really gets aggrevating...ya know ?
#2
Well whenever I play an F i just play the upper 4 notes
This is a regular f
E 1
B 1
G 2
D 3
A 3
E 1

An equivalent is
E 1
B 1
G 3
D 4
A x
E x

That way you don't have to barre everything and your pinky and ring fingers aren't in that super awkward position. But you do have to just practice a lot and get used to it.
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#3
Try forming a major or minor bar chord with the fingers that are not on the bar near the lower strings not the high i.e. (the root of the chord on the A string). Now remove the bar, and play just the D, G, and B strings. If the chord has an E in it you can play E open strings to it. If it has an A you can play the A open string.


Alex Lifeson uses this in his playing, because it gives a different sound, and its faster to switch from chord to chord.
Last edited by Petrucciowns at Oct 16, 2009,
#4
Thanks ripjoestrummer..............i will give that a try and i will continue to practice
#5
i will also give that a try Petrucciowns.......anything to get beyond the barre finger fustrations.....Thank You
#6
I was gonna come in here to say what ripjoestrummer said.

You can leave out the B and high E string from 6th string root bar chords because they are only doubling other notes of the chord in octaves. It should sound fine. In some cases it sounds better because bar chords have a tendency to sound really bright some times.
#7
I'm going to go ahead and ask has he tried Hendrix's method of using barre chords. If not, give those a try, if you still have trouble, try ripjoestrummer's method.
#8
To be honest you should just stop trying to find a way around barre chords and practice them. You're going to need them a lot later on.
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#9
Quote by falconthefirst
To be honest you should just stop trying to find a way around barre chords and practice them. You're going to need them a lot later on.


This. Although it's not wrong to look for alternatives, to play a song you really want to learn for example, you really shouldn't completely neglect barre chords.
#10
The chord will technically be a 'barre chord without a barre' if it's still got the same notes in it. An open E Major chord is the same 'shape' as a barre chord, without the barre.
#12
I don't know why you'd want to do that, but if you absolutely needed to, I would use ripjoestrummer's method. If the point of this is to avoid barre chords, you might as well learn them.
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#13
Quote by Petrucciowns
Iknonklast,

Except that there is a bar it's the nut.

That was my point...every single chord could be looked at as a barre without a barre because they don't exist. It's either a barre or it's not.
#14
Not actually looking for a way out of Barre chords...looking for a much better remedy of producing them without the continueous struggle and fustration of one sounds good the next does not etc etc.....if there is a way one can play the SAME Chord without the Whole barre.....to me that is a much better solution , then a continued review of one good one bad...seemingly no matter how much practice is given...it hasnt produced any better results then a few good and a few bad......Just looking for experianced input on the methods and remedies.....that others use......i have seen many professionals who play those chords without the Barre and always wondered how they did it , the way they did it........and get a better result and some a better sound.........i'm learning and growing and trying to persue every avenue of that capability.......cant learn unless i ask to know...and try every avenue others use.....thats my take on it anyway .

Thank You to ALL who have answered and commented....its all great information to me
#16
Quote by ripjoestrummer

This is a regular f
E 1
B 1
G 2
D 3
A 3
E 1

An equivalent is
E 1
B 1
G 3
D 4
A x
E x


I hope you typo'd that F#
#17
Hi mate,

I'm new to this board and some of the terminology you guys have is totally foreign to me!!

But, instead of barring the whole way across with an E shape barre chord, have you tried playing the root note with by bringing your thumb over the top?

That way, you only need to 'bar' with your first finger on the 1st (E) and 2nd (A) strings?

Do you get what I mean?

Oh...and sorry if I've got the wrong end of the stick....
#18
ex
B1
G2
D3
Ax
E1

Would be an F chord.
Use Thumb for the 1 on the E
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#19
A lot of people fret the bottom note of an E-shape barre chord with their thumb, and just make a small barre on the top two strings.
#20
if it has the same notes, for example:

-------------8-------
------------10------
-5---10-----10--17-
-7----7---------15-
-8----8---------12-
------8-------------



all of those chords have the F major triad (F A C), therefore, they're all Fmajor
#21
Quote by falconthefirst
To be honest you should just stop trying to find a way around barre chords and practice them. You're going to need them a lot later on.


I'd have to agree. I used to get frustrated that I wouldn’t hold it down hard enough so it would buzz or not ring at all, I also couldn’t get my finger in the right place but after enough practice I can finally do it! Just practice practice practice, you’ll feel extremely rewarded when you find that you can form and hold a barre. I know you’ve heard “practice” all the time but if your trying to learn the guitar why not just keep going at it, I mean once you can do a barre chord SOOO much music is easier to play. Just start slowly with getting 1 finger in the right spot, then 2 fingers etc…. You’ll get it eventually and be happy you did!
#22
This is all true, you will definitely need to learn how to do the barre eventually. I just learned how to form the bottom 3 notes first, and once I got used to that the rest was cake. But you can use the method I showed as its less painful. Keep in mind this is primarily used as an f chord, but you can really play it up and down the fretboard (shift your hand up 4 frets and you now have an a chord) and use variations of the fingering. Free Fallin' by Tom Petty is barely more than a variation of the f chord. Bands like The Clash use the f chord fingering all over the fretboard, just keep that in mind.
Quote by Sooopo
You sir, have made my day awesome.


8/7/09

RIP Les Paul, I bet he's forming a kick-ass band up there to play The Great Gig in the Sky. Maybe we'll all have to use a Stairway to Heaven to go see them play. You know I'm funny.
#23
Thanks to ALL , for all the information...it is much needed , and deeply appreciated .
#24
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
I hope you typo'd that F#


Nope....he's correct. The 4th fret on the D string is the root (F)
#25
Like it has been mentioned, you'll need to learn full barres sooner or later, but there's a big but. In a band situation with more than one guitar or with a piano/keyboard etc partial chords often work much better than full barres. If one guitar plays something in the lower register, the other guitarist could very well limit himself to only the top 4 or 3 strings. And since at least the bassist will be there to provide the root tone (and often the second guitarist and piano as well), you can easily leave out the root tone from the chord. The fifth isn't that important either.

Another thing that makes your chord sequences sound more fluent is to avoid big intervals while changing chords (ie. moving your hand up and down the neck a lot, like you would do with barre chords). Try to find chord inversions that are close to each other, or move your way up or down the neck in small steps. For example moving upward with your chords often sounds really good when the vocal melody or bassline is moving down. It makes the arrangement sound much more interesting than if all instruments are going same way.

Hope that helps or at least gives you some ideas to experiment with.