#1
Howdy,
Let me begin by saying I'm a mediocre guitarist absolutely obsessed with Matt Bellamy (Muse) and all his songs and therefore I seem to play them chronically. I think it's because of this I now have a love of natural harmonics and using them effectively.

I tend to do a harmonic and then whammy it in some weird way just for lolz, and especially like doing multiple harmonics at the same time (so pretty much a chord of harmonics) e.g. when in Drop D doing:

D----3--
A----3---
D----3---

All as a natural harmonic sounds instense. Anyways my knowledge on guitar is absolutely terrible I seem to have skipped pretty much everything I should have learnt and therefore have no idea on how to set up my guitar/amp properly and use appropriate technique.


So basically I'm looking for some tips on how to get the most out of natural harmonics, at the moment my mains problems are:

1) Not sustaining long enough.

2) Not really able to hear the harmonic, this only really happens when previous strings are still ringing from a previous note or something. I assume this is standard, at the moment if I hit a chord and then a natural harmonic sometimes you won't hear the harmonic, but then you stop the other strings playing and the harmonic is perfectly clearly playing.
Is there a way to over-come this? Amp settings or something?


These are my main problems atm that come to mind and I'll be sure to post more if I can think of them.

My amp is a solid state Hughes and Kettner 100W Matrix 100, connected to a Vox 120Watt cab.

^ I think that terminology's right xD Like I said I have 0 knowledge on technical side of stuff.

Please post solutions to either problems if you have any, post effective amp setups and playing technique.

Thanks

-rk
#2
I'm not really an expert either but from my experience, the more distortion the better it sounds, so just crank that fuzz up aight?
I have no dream, therefore whatever happens is okay
#3
hmm I'll give it a try. Also gives me more incentive to get a zvex fuzz factory in that case
#4
For sustain, you can try using feed back. Some people say they go on for longer if you use the bridge pickup but I don't know about that.
Breaking stereotypes by playing indie on a metal guitar.

Current Gear
- Epiphone Les Paul Standard (Plus Top)
- Crappy Strat Copy (Redecorated, looks snazzy)
- Ibanez Acoustic/Electric Guitar
- Ibanez RG1570 Mirage Blue
- Peavey Vypyr 30 Watt
#5
Another option would seem to be a compressor so that the chord doesn't get quite as loud, and it allows the harmonics to jump over the chord. Probably a stupid way of doing it, but it works for me.
#6
Quote by PimpSmurf
Another option would seem to be a compressor so that the chord doesn't get quite as loud, and it allows the harmonics to jump over the chord. Probably a stupid way of doing it, but it works for me.


sounds like it could work, thanks for the help guys
#7
Hmmm, assuming that your guitar set-up isn't totally unusable (which it shouldn't be...), it doesn't sound like you're hitting the harmonics totally accurately. If you don't hit them spot on, you will actually mute the string with your finger.

It's not about just cranking up the distortion, because its possible to get pretty good natural harmonics on an acoustic (ha! you can even get pinch harmonics on an acoustic- so it's not about how much gain you have!).

I suggest you really try and focus on where on the string you're hitting it- play around with slightly different positions- because even the smallest amout out will actually mute the note. Muting sounds like what is happening here.
#8
Ye, I see what you mean, I assume you're talking about left hand ye? However I think it's more of a volume issue as the harmonics are generally there but drowned out by other notes.
#9
dont want to sound condescending but you're not leaving your finger muting the fundamental are you? i find a quick dab (enough to mute the fundamental) and then release lets them come out often louder than playing the fret normally.

how do they sound when you're not plugged in? reason i ask is that mine sound just how i want them when im messing around with the guitar unplugged but the minute i go through my amp all i get is some distant muted sound. dont know what the cause of this is. .

this doesnt really answer your question but have you tried pinch harmonics? just that they always squeel out above everything else and you can then wobble a bit of vibrato or bend on to them as well as whammying.
#10
Quote by clear and blue
dont want to sound condescending but you're not leaving your finger muting the fundamental are you? i find a quick dab (enough to mute the fundamental) and then release lets them come out often louder than playing the fret normally.

how do they sound when you're not plugged in? reason i ask is that mine sound just how i want them when im messing around with the guitar unplugged but the minute i go through my amp all i get is some distant muted sound. dont know what the cause of this is. .

this doesnt really answer your question but have you tried pinch harmonics? just that they always squeel out above everything else and you can then wobble a bit of vibrato or bend on to them as well as whammying.


I can get them to ring out perfectly unplugged and yes I just read your thread. It's sort of like your problem, my harmonics get played but I just want them to be brought out more.

I can pinch no problem but as I said I like chord harmonics with distortion and whammy bar etc, you can only pinch one note at a time
#11
just got a line 6 studio ux 1 audio interface thingy this weekend (to plug into your computer) . im getting the natural harmonics to come through just fine with the same guitar (also in out of phase position too) through the amp sims on Pod Farm which suggests the problem lies with the amp somewhere.

will take more faffing about to figure out where the problem is exactly but if my computer can produce natural harmonics i dont know why a decent tube amp cant do it ?!?