#1
Hi UG!

I need advice with switching between chords and licks. Whenever I switch from playing a chord progression to a little lick, I always seem to miss the first notes. And vice versa, if I'm finished playing a lick, the chord I play is never as smooth as I want it to be (a little bit of buzz due to fingers not being down correctly).

As per usual, I imagine the consensus is to practice slowly, but is there is anything more that I can do?

I contemplated learning other pieces that used chords and licks simultaneously, but how do I practice it if the licks I want to use are my own?

Thanks!
Tom.
Quote by strat0blaster
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Well played, my friend.

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#2
The answer is very easy: Practice, and with experience you will improve.

Also, an example might help if you want very detailed help.
#3
Hehe, well if practicing slowly is all there is to it, I'm quite happy.
It was more about me wondering if there was anything else I could do to assist its growth.

There aren't any actual examples that come to mind tbh.
It's just things like, I'll be playing a chord progression, and (generally) it resolves to the tonic, where I enjoy adding a lick to it. But no matter where on the neck I try and do said lick, I'll always miss the first notes, or else they'll sound very weak and flat sounding (That's not an actual flat note in melody terms, but rather the note just dies).
Even if it's in the same position as the chord, it will sound like it is a bit lacking.
Quote by strat0blaster
HA!

Well played, my friend.

I'm going to edit that awful grammar right now


Yay, I'm sigged!!
And a grammar nazi..
#4
The only thing that can be said other than practise is probably how to write the lick. Try do use arpeggios of the chord progressions your playing, this will tie it in to the music nicely and be rather quick to get to from the chords.
#5
Here's a fun exercise/jam:

Twelve bar blues in E, using Em pentatonic scale (or dorian, if you fancy) at fret 0-3. Play the chord progression, and at the end of each bar throw in a bluesy lick. Once you get better, expand to higher frets, grab the chords higher up the neck, use chord-riffs, etc. Get funky. My teacher gave me this exercise and it's a real blast.

If that's what you've been doing (or close to it), just keep practicing. Start with easy licks, like :


e|------
B|------
G|----0-
D|-0h2--
A|------
E|------


or


e|------
B|----2-
G|----2-
D|----2-
A|------
E|-3b5--


And most importantly, have fun.

#6
Thanks, I'll try that!
Is that the most beneficial thing?
Quote by strat0blaster
HA!

Well played, my friend.

I'm going to edit that awful grammar right now


Yay, I'm sigged!!
And a grammar nazi..