#1
Some scales have chord scales linked with them.
EG:
CDEFGABC
C Dm Em F G Am Bm C
I want to know how to extract a chord scale from any given scale even the really difficult ones. I know that the chords in the chord scale will consist of the scale's notes and that most likely there willl be one chord for each note.
But I don't know much more then this.
Also I have no clue about how to do this with non-diatonic scales.
Can someone give me a few examples like the minor pentonic scale, the blues scale (minor pentonic with passing notes added in) or the C tritone scale (I believe as the tritone scale is so dissonant this is probably really difficult)?
Last edited by Zombiechao at Oct 17, 2009,
#2
CDEFGABC
C Dm Em F G Am Bm C

All the chords have the notes of the C scale in them (B minor should be B diminished). I suggest you look at some on the lessons on Major and Minor scales and chord construction on the site, that should make it all come together
#3
you know the notes in a scale, and you know how to construct chords. just go from there.
#4
there's a chord for every degree of the scale

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Maj Min Min Maj Maj min min -5 (flat 5th)


for example, we can take, Bb major, which would be

Bb Cm Dm Eb E F Gm Am-5
#5
Learn to harmonise the scale by stacking 3rds.

If you take the C Major scale, you get those chords by stacking 3rds, whihc is basically alternate notes:

C D E F G A B

C is the root of your first chord, a 3rd above that is E, a 3rd above that is G

So your first chord is C E G - which is a Major 3rd (C to E) with a minor 3rd (E to G) on top - which makes it a Major chord - C Maj

D is the root of your second chord:

C D E F G A B

a 3rd above D is F, a 3rd above that is A

So your second chord is D F A - which is a minor 3rd (D to F) with a Major 3rd (F to A) on top - which makes it a minor chord - D min

To make 7th chords you stack another 3rd on top of the triad.