#1
So, I had a music theory midterm on wednesday, and instead of testing us just on what we learned, which were cadences, non-harmonic tones, and identifying phrases, he gave us the sheet music to Mozart's "Ein Klien Nacht Music." We were supposed to identify the chords and everything in there. The entire class did so badly that he didn't grade the tests and now we have to take another test on wednesday.

So my question is, how should I prepare. I'm at a disadvantage because I have never read music before this class, but there has to be a way for me to do better than I did.

The biggest problem was identifying chords, but there were chords that were made up of G, A, and B, so how would I do that?

So pretty much, how do I prepare
#2
Depends. If you're doing more than Triads then I can't really help you as I haven't gotten into anything past that. But if you're doing triads then just get some music paper and mark it treble clef and throw a note, it's third, and it's fifth and try identifying it. You'll learn your notes and get a little practice with chords.

hope that made sense/helps
#3
If you need practice with identifying notes on different clefs, http://musictheory.net/ is a good place to go. If you go under Trainers and pick note trainer, it'll test you on identifying notes on a staff, and you can do it for treble, bass, alto, and tenor clefs. I think in general, you'll encounter more bass and treble than tenor and alto, since violas are one of the few instruments who use alto and tenor is primarily for lower instruments on occasion. They also have chord trainers. Lessons are also pretty handy.

Good luck!
Last edited by Apollo X at Oct 17, 2009,
#4
Thanks for some of the help already, but as a more specific question, how would I identify a chord in this song that contains C, D, and G? Because that isn't a major or minor chord. Its also not an F#dim, so how should I do that? Oh yeah the key is G Major
#5
What is the song exactly? Are you sure those are the notes? If some notes are in a different clef, you might want to double check that they are those notes. Or perhaps, since you mentioned you've been learning passing tones, one of those notes could be moving from a note that would fit the chord.
Last edited by Apollo X at Oct 17, 2009,
#6
The song is ein klein nacht musik by Mozart. The big problem I think is that there are 2 treble clefs, a C clef, and a bass clef, and I had never seen a piece of music like that before, so I had no idea what do. And the passing tone idea does make sense, I'll look into that again
#7
All right, found the score for it. Can you tell me which measure this is at?
#9
Quote by nightrain789
Thanks for some of the help already, but as a more specific question, how would I identify a chord in this song that contains C, D, and G? Because that isn't a major or minor chord. Its also not an F#dim, so how should I do that? Oh yeah the key is G Major

You need to learn how to construct more chords.

For the chord you posted you would have to know the root of the chord. I'm guessing the root is G, in which case it is a Gsus4 chord.

sus4 chords contain the root, perfect fourth and perfect fifth. Other common chords:

sus2 = 1 2 5
dim = 1 b3 b5
aug = 1 3 #5
7 = 1 3 5 b7
maj7 = 1 3 5 7
min7 = 1 b3 5 b7

Those are reasonably common chord formations, so maybe you should learn them before the next test.

Edit:
Quote by nightrain789
The song is ein klein nacht musik by Mozart. The big problem I think is that there are 2 treble clefs, a C clef, and a bass clef, and I had never seen a piece of music like that before, so I had no idea what do. And the passing tone idea does make sense, I'll look into that again

Just work out the what the notes are on each clef.

If you don't the notes on all of the clefs you can just work out all the notes by remembering where middle C is. So for trebble it is the first ledger line below, bass the first ledger line above and for the C clefs it's wherever the two lines in the clef meet.

After that look at what notes form each chord then use these to work out the chord.
Last edited by 12345abcd3 at Oct 18, 2009,
#10
As far as identifying chords goes, a major chord is a root, a third, and a fifth - all note changes will change the name of the chord depending on where that note falls in relation to the root note. Also, note the key you're in.