#1
His strat has a rosewood fretboard while mine has a maple one. But the body of his guitar also seems heavier, not just the neck; what might be the cause? My strat was made in 2008-2009 and his strat was made in 2004-2005.
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#2
could be a different body wood. i don't know what the certain woods might be, but there really isn't a whole lot else that it could be
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#3
I find this hard to believe... Though u may be right. Perhaps fender changed there sources for alder.
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#4
there umm... could be a bomb in the guitar :O!

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but Life Is a Bullet16 is probably right.
#5
Because it's older. The older something is the denser the wood is going to be, not because of it's age, but because of what's happened to the environment. Call it hippie bullcrap, but I'm fairly certain there are studies somewhere that back this up. With the levels of pollution in the past few years five years will make a difference. It's also possible Fender changed sources as has been said, but either way the wood is denser. Denser wood = more toneful wood, hence why 50's guitars sound so amazing. Ergo, his guitar is heavier because it's denser.
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#6
That sounds plausible... At first I thought my guitar could be made of a different kind of wood, but every MIM strat is made of alder.
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#7
would be weird, but one could be ash too. wouldn't be very likely, but i know fender has used spare MIA parts on MIM guitars (like flamed maple necks, instead of the normal plain maple). the better chance is a different alder source, but it would be interesting if one was ash

EDIT: or poplar or something. i'm not too well educated on what woods fender really does use for different strats haha
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Last edited by LifeIsABullet16 at Oct 19, 2009,
#8
Quote by necrosis1193
Because it's older. The older something is the denser the wood is going to be, not because of it's age, but because of what's happened to the environment. Call it hippie bullcrap, but I'm fairly certain there are studies somewhere that back this up. With the levels of pollution in the past few years five years will make a difference. It's also possible Fender changed sources as has been said, but either way the wood is denser. Denser wood = more toneful wood, hence why 50's guitars sound so amazing. Ergo, his guitar is heavier because it's denser.


Pollution is a plausible reason.

Also in the past few years, there has been a drive towards the use of renewable natural resources. Some guitar companies have begun to use wood from virgin trees planted specifically for the purpose of being made into guitar bodies.

Virgin trees give less dense wood than older trees.

Also if the tree your friend's guitar body was made from, went through harsher and longer winters, the wood is denser compared to wood from trees which experience gentler winters.
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Last edited by ragingkitty at Oct 19, 2009,
#9
Also not all pieces of wood is gonna have the same density. One piece of alder can be more dense then others. this can vary by quite alot so it is possible that the wood in your guitar is on the light side of the average density of alder and ur friends is on the heavier.
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#10
Also, if I recall correctly, wood closer to the roots are denser than wood higher up.
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#11
I'm ok with it being lighter, but I would be worried if it was poplar instead of alder.
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#12
Doesn't matter, you could have 2 of the same guitars from the same year and they wont be the same weight.
#14
You can have two guitars with wood from the exact same tree that won't weigh the same.

Heavier = denser, denser = brighter and slightly more comrpessed tone.
Lighter = the opposite, obviously.
Sustain is also effected, but it depend son the type of wood; some woods sustain longer if they're dense pieces, other species sustains longer if it's more porous.

Though the differences aren't hugely noticable anyway, when the woods are the same species. A piece of heavy alder won't sound hugely different to a piece of light alder, assuming they're the same type of alder and have been treated in the same way.
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#15
Quote by MrFlibble
You can have two guitars with wood from the exact same tree that won't weigh the same.

Heavier = denser, denser = brighter and slightly more comrpessed tone.
Lighter = the opposite, obviously.

Sustain is also effected, but it depend son the type of wood; some woods sustain longer if they're dense pieces, other species sustains longer if it's more porous.

Though the differences aren't hugely noticable anyway, when the woods are the same species. A piece of heavy alder won't sound hugely different to a piece of light alder, assuming they're the same type of alder and have been treated in the same way.


Wouldnt a heavier wood give a more dull and fuller sound like in les pauls?

Mahogoney is a very dense wood compared to alder.
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#16
Actually its the opposite with me. My friends got a 2002 MIM and mines a 2007. Mines heavier then his..by at least a pound or 2
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#17
maybe the heavier one is actually a MIC (made in cuba) and the pickguard is filled with cocaine?
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#18
Quote by necrosis1193
Because it's older. The older something is the denser the wood is going to be, not because of it's age, but because of what's happened to the environment. Call it hippie bullcrap, but I'm fairly certain there are studies somewhere that back this up. With the levels of pollution in the past few years five years will make a difference. It's also possible Fender changed sources as has been said, but either way the wood is denser. Denser wood = more toneful wood, hence why 50's guitars sound so amazing. Ergo, his guitar is heavier because it's denser.



Sounds plausible indeed, but in 5 years i severly doubt it makes that much difference.

I had the same experience as the OP with a cheap Vintage SG i bought a few years back. My own personal guitar is very very heavy (unusual with an SG) with a very dark and grainy mahoghany body. I played another guitar of the same line, and it was the exact oppposite, with light wood tone, even grain, and a very light feel, and as you can guess, they sounded very different.

Strats, or with any guitar, there is a large variation in wood quality and density even with the same line of guitar using the same wood source, tree's aren't grown equal with different grain and different soil environment from tree to tree. It happens, and thats why its extra important to check out a guitar before you buy it, even with cheap guitars, each one has an individual feel.
#19
Quote by necrosis1193
Because it's older. The older something is the denser the wood is going to be, not because of it's age, but because of what's happened to the environment. Call it hippie bullcrap, but I'm fairly certain there are studies somewhere that back this up. With the levels of pollution in the past few years five years will make a difference. It's also possible Fender changed sources as has been said, but either way the wood is denser. Denser wood = more toneful wood, hence why 50's guitars sound so amazing. Ergo, his guitar is heavier because it's denser.


I'm not going to disagree with all that you said, just about denser being more toneful. This just isn't true. It's all about resonance, really. My PGM is ridiculously light and has a lovely tone of its own, but then my Swing is ridiculously heavy and also has a good tone of its own.

For example, a 54' Strat is light and has a great tone. Actually, people complain about certain late 70's/early 80's LPs for being too heavy and lacking that "Les Paul" tone.

Just my opinion on that one, mate.
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#20
Quote by Tatsumaru
Wouldnt a heavier wood give a more dull and fuller sound like in les pauls?

Mahogoney is a very dense wood compared to alder.
I'm talking about different cuts of the same species of wood, not species vs species. Limba is often denser than ash and has a darker tone; on the other hand rock maple, the most typcially dense of all common body woods, is also the brightest-toned. Different species will give vastly different tones regardless of density.
What we're talking about though is a piece of denser alder vs a piece of more standard alder, where it is a much more simple affair; denser = brighter.
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#21
Quote by necrosis1193
Because it's older. The older something is the denser the wood is going to be, not because of it's age, but because of what's happened to the environment. Call it hippie bullcrap, but I'm fairly certain there are studies somewhere that back this up. With the levels of pollution in the past few years five years will make a difference. It's also possible Fender changed sources as has been said, but either way the wood is denser. Denser wood = more toneful wood, hence why 50's guitars sound so amazing. Ergo, his guitar is heavier because it's denser.



That is not true. It's just not.
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#22
It could be the size of the cavities. If the cavities were bigger then it would be lighter, I don't know if it would be noticable or not though.
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#23
Ok different woods, different densities, pollution etc...that's all fine

Other than the weight is there any material difference to tone/sustain. One may be slightly heavier than the other for whatever reason, i'm no expert, but what i would be more worried about is if you can notice other significant differences.

If there are then I would expect there to have been some major change (diff tree source etc), if not then the heavier may be indicative of a much smaller issue, like the density/pollution stuff raised above.