#1
Please name a few techniques that are fun, and musically useful, to learn.
So far I can:
- Strum the guitar
- Play open chords
- Play bar chords
- Play power chords
Convert the vocal line in a song into a lead piece on the guitar fairly fast (about 3-5 minutes)
- Tremolo pick, albeit at fast speeds it's sloppy.
- Alternate pick
- The BEGINNINGS of sweep picking (I can play arpeggios with downstrokes on the way down and upstrokes on the way up)
- Play a few chord songs
- Improvise on top of chords played by others

But I want to learn something new. Something i've not listed, and sounds nice or is useful in playing guitar. Please tell me a few techniques that you know that fit that description.
Next to that, my legato quite sucks. I can play hammer-ons fairly fast, but my pull-offs are like 70% slower, and only when playing pull-offs really slowly, i get a good sound. So I have trouble mixing hammer-ons and pull-offs, because I can do hammer-ons fairly fast, but my pull-offs really slowly. Any tips on this? There's a lot of stuff I don't understand about legato - such as for example which fingers you need to have pressed down to pull off to. Just the note you want to pull-off to? Or the whole sequence of notes you make with your four fingers?

So, can you guys give me advice/resources/other things on both these requests? Many thanks, already.
#4
try sweep picking, sweep tapping, sweep tap slides/bends, practice legato more, 8 finger tapping. Press down fairly hard with your fingers during legato stuff to make it clear, when you pull off, dont pull your finger into another string because you might get unwanted noise. that's all i got

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#5
Quote by notsominidude
tapping and pinch harmonics are always good to learn


+1
#6
Quote by robinlint
Please name a few techniques that are fun, and musically useful, to learn.
So far I can:
- Strum the guitar
- Play open chords
- Play bar chords
- Play power chords
Convert the vocal line in a song into a lead piece on the guitar fairly fast (about 3-5 minutes)
- Tremolo pick, albeit at fast speeds it's sloppy.
- Alternate pick
- The BEGINNINGS of sweep picking (I can play arpeggios with downstrokes on the way down and upstrokes on the way up)
- Play a few chord songs
- Improvise on top of chords played by others
.

This is all too vague. You could also expand almost endlessley on what you've already listed. Can you strum in different time signatures and with different rhythmic groupings? Can you play every barre chord?

There is always more you can learn. Perfect what you already know and you'll be some guitarist..
#7
You don't need to learn any new techniques, but what you do need to do is start learning to use the ones you're already familiar with more effectively...become more accomplished as a guitarist. Put the sweep picking on the backburner too, there's absolutely no point torturing yourself with that so soon.

Obviously if you're learning a new song and there's a technique in there you've not come across before then learn it, but don't learn techniques for technique's sake just so you can tick off a box on a list. Just keep learning songs, everything new you learn goes a little further towards honing the skills you currently have.

Just learn to play the guitar, play songs you love, discover new ones and maybe even create your own but don't treat it as an obligation or something you need to get "finished". Just let yourself progress naturally, you'll have more fun that way.
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#8
Quote by steven seagull
You don't need to learn any new techniques, but what you do need to do is start learning to use the ones you're already familiar with more effectively...become more accomplished as a guitarist. Put the sweep picking on the backburner too, there's absolutely no point torturing yourself with that so soon.

You're right about learning them more effectively.
Perhaps I should have described it as playing arpeggios. I can play arpeggios fairly slowly. I do it for the sound, not the speed.


Obviously if you're learning a new song and there's a technique in there you've not come across before then learn it, but don't learn techniques for technique's sake just so you can tick off a box on a list. Just keep learning songs, everything new you learn goes a little further towards honing the skills you currently have.

Well, the point is.. I'm playing a lot of acoustic guitar and chords right now - but I also want to learn the more metal/rock parts. And I don't know much in the department of metal - sure, a few standard rock power chords, and slow lead parts, but other than that.. nothing. Perhaps I should've asked about techniques used in Metal.


Just learn to play the guitar, play songs you love, discover new ones and maybe even create your own but don't treat it as an obligation or something you need to get "finished". Just let yourself progress naturally, you'll have more fun that way.

I'm not treating it as something to get 'finished'. I just want to learn some new tricks to use, enhance my guitar tone, and play more advanced songs.
#9
Quote by Ikonoklast
This is all too vague. You could also expand almost endlessley on what you've already listed. Can you strum in different time signatures and with different rhythmic groupings? Can you play every barre chord?

There is always more you can learn. Perfect what you already know and you'll be some guitarist..

Sorry, I agree it was a general list. I'll expand a bit on it. I have to list my skills every time in this forum though, just so people know what skills I have on guitar - if I don't do that, people will only suggest stuff that I have already learnt, for example. Isn't there some area on this forum/the profiles to list skills, so you don't have to post it every time?

I don't understand time signatures that much, but I don't use time signatures - I do not find them useful. (I've done the 4/4 counting and all that, but I didn't like it, i prefer to just play rhythmic patterns)

I can play E shape bar chords in both the major and minor shapes (So, E string bar chords), and A shape bar chords in both the major and minor shapes (A string bar chords). I've just discovered the Dm shape bar chord, and the C shape bar chord. But I guess I don't know them all, but I know plenty of them for playing basic chord songs.

Oh, and please don't ignore the part about the legato, i would like help with that too, please

To all the others: Thanks for your advice, and recommendations on techniques.
#10
There's a whole universe of chords beyond open & power chords. Spend some time working on your chords and rhythm playing too.
#11
Quote by robinlint
Sorry, I agree it was a general list. I'll expand a bit on it. I have to list my skills every time in this forum though, just so people know what skills I have on guitar - if I don't do that, people will only suggest stuff that I have already learnt, for example. Isn't there some area on this forum/the profiles to list skills, so you don't have to post it every time?

I don't understand time signatures that much, but I don't use time signatures - I do not find them useful. (I've done the 4/4 counting and all that, but I didn't like it, i prefer to just play rhythmic patterns)

I can play E shape bar chords in both the major and minor shapes (So, E string bar chords), and A shape bar chords in both the major and minor shapes (A string bar chords). I've just discovered the Dm shape bar chord, and the C shape bar chord. But I guess I don't know them all, but I know plenty of them for playing basic chord songs.

Oh, and please don't ignore the part about the legato, i would like help with that too, please

To all the others: Thanks for your advice, and recommendations on techniques.

Okay so chords i would suggest next (if you can play and are comfortable with A and E SHAPE barres) would be Minor and Major 6th (both shapes), Dominant 7 (both shapes) Major + Minor 7 (both shapes).

That should get you really going with barre chords for now.

As far as rhythm and timing go, i'm afraid if you want to get better at playing in time you're going to have to learn at least 4/4, 3/4 and 6/8...staying in time over perhaps just 4 bars to begin with should be enough. These signatures give the song a different pulse, and a different feel. For instance, 6/8 is used a lot in nursery rhymes. Gives it a more flowing feel than 3/4.
#13
Quote by robinlint
Sorry, I agree it was a general list. I'll expand a bit on it. I have to list my skills every time in this forum though, just so people know what skills I have on guitar - if I don't do that, people will only suggest stuff that I have already learnt, for example. .

You can never fully "learn" a technique. Just because you can alternate pick doesn't mean you should write it off. It's the backbone of all guitar playing and can always be improved on. Mix alternate picking and legato and you got some killer licks. Try some three note per string runs for legato, you can even just type 'legato' in on youtube and find some lessons. Those two skills IMO should come before sweep picking.
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#15
muffled strings that's great with rhythm makes the rhythm more interesting. I do it a lot and it's really easy same with galloping.
#16
You could learn to sing, or you can learn some basic theory.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#17
Economy picking. (front page)

Tapping.
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#18
1. You mentioned your legato, esp. your pull-offs, are weak. Work on this before even thinking about new techniques to work on. This is one of the core techniques of playing guitar. Regarding your question about finger placement for pull-offs, there are other ways, but the most common one is as follows: Suppose you are doing a pull-off from fingers 4 to 2 to 1. Place fingers 4,2,1 on the fretboard at the same time while picking 4. Then pull off your pinky to sound 2, then pull off your middle to sound 1. The key is making sure that the finger being pulled off to is already there when the pull-off is executed. The pull-off motion should include a slight flick diagonally away (up from the fretboard, and down towards the floor) to sound the note, don't just lift it up.

2. Work on your chords. The types that Ikonoklast gave you are a good suggestion. Together with the add 9's, and suspended 2nds and 4ths, these pretty much cover most of what you are likely to run into, baring the odd wierdo chord now and again.

3. Work on your counting. You mentioned getting frustrated with counting 4/4 time. You've got to work through that. After being able to keep the beat, awareness of where the measure begins is the most important timing skill, well..on second thoughts, equal with being able subdivide the beat well.


EDIT: Even though I numbered these 1-3, that doesn't indicate the order of importance. These are all really important!
Last edited by se012101 at Oct 19, 2009,
#19
Quote by devilzdj4
You should give Hybrid picking a shot, very interesting technique.

+1000000

You can apply hybrid picking in a lot of ways, can make your playing insanely more interesting, and string skipping and quite a few picking patterns are made easy with some practice
^Note: Probably sarcastic
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#20
Quote by se012101
1. You mentioned your legato, esp. your pull-offs, are weak. Work on this before even thinking about new techniques to work on. This is one of the core techniques of playing guitar. Regarding your question about finger placement for pull-offs, there are other ways, but the most common one is as follows: Suppose you are doing a pull-off from fingers 4 to 2 to 1. Place fingers 4,2,1 on the fretboard at the same time while picking 4. Then pull off your pinky to sound 2, then pull off your middle to sound 1. The key is making sure that the finger being pulled off to is already there when the pull-off is executed. The pull-off motion should include a slight flick diagonally away (up from the fretboard, and down towards the floor) to sound the note, don't just lift it up.

Thanks! This was just what I was looking for.


2. Work on your chords. The types that Ikonoklast gave you are a good suggestion. Together with the add 9's, and suspended 2nds and 4ths, these pretty much cover most of what you are likely to run into, baring the odd wierdo chord now and again.

Alright.


3. Work on your counting. You mentioned getting frustrated with counting 4/4 time. You've got to work through that. After being able to keep the beat, awareness of where the measure begins is the most important timing skill, well..on second thoughts, equal with being able subdivide the beat well.

Ah, no. I wasn't getting frustrated with 4/4 time, but doing so made my rhythm boring and almost always the same. I did the "1 2 3 1 2 3" as well, which I guess would be 3/4 time?
But because it made my rhythm boring, I stopped using it.
Last edited by robinlint at Oct 20, 2009,
#21
Depends where the beat is - which is why playing with a metronome is crucial.

Playing 123 123 could be 3/4. If you're playing in 4/4 and count 123 it is classed as triplets, which is different.
#22
Quote by robinlint
Ah, no. I wasn't getting frustrated with 4/4 time, but doing so made my rhythm boring and almost always the same. I did the "1 2 3 1 2 3" as well, which I guess would be 3/4 time?
But because it made my rhythm boring, I stopped using it.
4/4 time just means each bar is broken down into 4 quarter beats - it doesn't mean you have to play 4 quarter notes though. Try making up strumming patterns/rhythms using a mixture of 1/2 notes, 1/4 notes, 1/8th notes, 1/6th notes and triplets in 4/4 and 3/4 time.

1 2 3 1 2 3 is 3/4 time (if they are straight quarter beats)

1 e & a 2 & 3 & a is also 3/4 time...just with the first beat broken down into semiquavers, the second into quavers and the 3rd into triplets. You don't have to play straight crotchets - that just shows you where the beat falls - so if you're using a metronome you'd set that up to tick for each 1/4 beat, but you can break down each 1/4 beat into whatever suits on your guitar.

I'm not sure I explained that very well :S sorry

There's no way 4/4 should ever get boring. You change time sigs because what you're playing/writing fits into a different time sig - not because one time sig is more interesting than any other.