#1
What are some music majors other than Recording and Teaching, I want to go to school for music, but I'm not sure what music major I should do. Right now I'm thinking about recording.
I play guitar.
#2
What do you want to do? There's no point in majoring in something just for the sake of it.
Call me Batman.
#3
Quote by TheWho2
What are some music majors other than Recording and Teaching, I want to go to school for music, but I'm not sure what music major I should do. Right now I'm thinking about recording.


Music Business
Music performance
shred is gaudy music
#4
Quote by J.A.M
What do you want to do? There's no point in majoring in something just for the sake of it.

I KNOW I want to major in music, I just want to know of other majors besides recording and teaching. To see if there is anything that interest me more.

Other than just major names can i also get a little info about them also, thanks.
I play guitar.
#5
Okay.... you want to go to school for music. Why? What do you hope to get out of it? Where will this going to school for music take you?

I strongly advise against recording.

First, there are studios closing down daily because the market is just not there anymore to support many of them. Your potential number of employers is dwindling all the time, and those people who had jobs at those studios (and therefore experience) will be competing with you looking for work at the handful that are still standing.

Second, most real-world studios don't care that much if you have qualifications on paper. They look at what your track record is. What have you done? Can I hear your work? That sort of thing. Someone whose work speaks for itself without training will get the job pretty much every time over someone whose work is okay who has training.

By extension of both of those, most studios don't put out ads "wanted: studio engineer." They take advantage of their existing set of contacts and connections and fish from that pond. It is very much a business of who you know.

So.... given all that, the best way of getting a job at a major studio is:
1. Show up at their door and introduce yourself. Do this many times if necessary. Be a polite, cordial, eager and pleasant pain in the ass. You're not there for a job yet. You're volunteering to make coffee, vacuum carpets, be a gopher when someone in a band needs smokes, water plants, whatever. In return, all you ask is for the chance to watch a few sessions so you can start learning some stuff.
2. Once your foot is in the door, be the best coffee maker, carpet vacuumer, corner-store runner you can. It shows you're worth the effort for them to have you around. They'll start to like you and be more willing to let you watch. They'll even teach you the proper way to wind cables.
3. Eventually, you'll be given jobs like setting up mics and moving them around the room as the engineer tells you what to do - "closer... closer.... back it off a bit... now left... "

Little jobs at a time, and you'll be trained on site by the people who know what they are doing. It won't cost you anything but time.

As they get confidence in your knowledge, reliability, etc., there will come a time when the studio makes some concession to band where they'll give them a cut rate if they're willing to come in at 6:00am and work with one of their interns. That would be you. Maybe it will come up as one of the regular studio assistants is sick, or quits, or whatever, and you'll get called up to help out. Sure, you're last picked, but at least you're picked.

You'll start noticing that other people with genuine credentials are sending in their resumees. The studio, already with a full complement of staff, including interns, assistants, lackeys, etc. does not typically call those applicants back.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
I totally agree with Axeman. This is what I always talk about with someone who is interested in music. My college has about 100 new students who came just for production. With the current economy, I wonder if this 100 will make a living out after they get their majors. I know an engineer who owns a full equipped studio and with about 20 years of experience, struggling to make a living. So, what's that new 100 gonna do?

Any way, other majors are composition, music merchandising/business, journalism and music history.
#7
Some of those will be different at the university level too. Typical university majors would be:

-performance
-education
-history+theory
-composition

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
I wouldnt recommend engineering. Just sayin. Too many good engineers and not enough jobs to go around.

Teaching is the "safest" major.

Im planning on doing a performance major in tuba. I can tell you that the professional tuba field is actually very lucrative
#9
Yes, teaching is the 'safest' of all of them, but it really has to be 'in you' and you have to really *want* to do it.

Be sure to read my post here http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...37&postcount=20 in this thread about teaching. Though a bit lengthy, it contains a critically important perspective. It's a fantastic career, but the words 'backup plan' are waving a big red flag. You *have* to *want* to do it.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
^ Link copy fail

Also, in this economy, sustaining a career as a music teacher is becoming harder and harder, since arts programs are usually the first things that schools trim back, trim back, and then ultimately cut (God forbid they take a dime away from the football or basketball teams). My wife's been a music teacher for seven years, so we've lived through a lot of ups and downs. She's currently getting a 2nd degree in school administration because the market sucks so hard for music teachers at this point.
Hi, I'm Peter
Last edited by Dirk Gently at Oct 20, 2009,
#11
I was also thinking about teaching but then I thought, I know kids don't want to play the music that they are given in school bands, and I see how annoyed my band director gets, so idk if i wanna do that. Unless i get a job at some music school. But then I'm pretty sure i will need to go to graduate school for that, which isnt that bad.
Or i can be like my guitar teacher, he does private and group lessons and he also plays with bands to get extra $$.


@axe: that link doesn't work.
I play guitar.
#12
For me teaching is alright, and it's enjoyable to see my students get better. BUT the repetitiveness of teaching the same base level stuff, being patient with students that aren't trying or just aren't getting things, and having to come up with lesson plans/or a map of progression for each student all irritate me. I know I would be shooting myself in the foot if i pursued a teaching career, although I too have been told by a lot of people teaching music is the safest music career and a great 'fallback' plan.
Quote by acjshapiro

Quote by Vrstone87

meh, I've listened to every radiohead album and honestly don't get what everyone loves about them.....


cause you're ****ing stupid

#13
Quote by 3holepunch
For me teaching is alright, and it's enjoyable to see my students get better. BUT the repetitiveness of teaching the same base level stuff, being patient with students that aren't trying or just aren't getting things, and having to come up with lesson plans/or a map of progression for each student all irritate me. I know I would be shooting myself in the foot if i pursued a teaching career, although I too have been told by a lot of people teaching music is the safest music career and a great 'fallback' plan.


so you are teaching? or are u still in school? If your still in school what is your major?
I play guitar.
#14
If you go to University of Oklahoma Honors College, you can major in guitar. Not composition. Not education. Just guitar. If I were to go there that'd be my minor lol
The world doesn't revolve around you. If it does, beware. You're probably about to pass out drunk.

The 19 year old who knows his stuff. Most of the time.
#15
Quote by Zakkcd
If you go to University of Oklahoma Honors College, you can major in guitar. Not composition. Not education. Just guitar. If I were to go there that'd be my minor lol


yeah... I live in New York not planning on going that far.
I play guitar.
#16
Quote by Zakkcd
If you go to University of Oklahoma Honors College, you can major in guitar. Not composition. Not education. Just guitar. If I were to go there that'd be my minor lol


Well, yes. But the way it works is this: You major in a specific instrument. I majored in guitar when I did my undergrad. But, within that music degree program where guitar was my major, I was in the education stream. Another guitar major was in the composition stream, a couple others were in the history and theory stream, a couple were in the performance stream, etc.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
Quote by 3holepunch
I too have been told by a lot of people teaching music is the safest music career and a great 'fallback' plan.


Picking up a few extra bucks teaching a few private lessons is one thing, but devoting your working life to the teaching profession is a whole other bag of tricks.

Sorry, that link I put up was outdated. Grrr....

Here was roughly the advice I gave there.

Teaching is a great career for the person who WANTS to do it. If you don't feel 'called' to do it, you will hate it. The people who get into it for the money and the holidays, etc. are the ones who get eaten alive by it - usually within their first two years. The demands and the stress can be huge, and if you're not enjoying it otherwise, the money and holidays will be small consolation for a lifetime of misery. If you don't actually want to teach, you'll be better off selling insurance policies over the phone.

Thirteen years into my career, I'm still putting in a 50-hour work week. More often than not, I don't have time to eat lunch. There are ministry assessments, board assessments, school assessments, and the individual student assessments (report cards, etc.) all to be done. Parents, students, administrators, and your obligations as mandated by the ministry don't always align perfectly. If you're stuck working for a poor administrator, the job can be a living hell. I've been there. And that's someone who otherwise loves teaching.

I'm not complaining. I asked for this. There are so many reasons why I love teaching, but the public perception of what teachers do is often time skewed rather unfavourably, to the point where some random cracker-jack parent who watched a half-hour show on PBS somehow thinks they're qualfied to do your job.

The good news is, particularly with a strong teachers' union behind you, you have a lot of support at the time when you most desperately need it. (children's aid allegations, administrative bullying, etc.) You also have a job that is FAR more secure than nearly any job out there - particularly once you've built up some seniority. In our board's seniority list, there are over 1000 teachers below me. Pretty much the only thing that would see me laid off would be a nuclear bomb.

Now as a music teacher, most school boards (and their collective agreements) hire the teacher, but do not specify that that teacher MUST teach music. In Ontario, I could get a job as a high school music teacher. But.... I am also qualified to teach pretty well any other subject up to grade ten. So, in the event that there aren't enough music classes, an administrator could give me a grade nine math class, a grade ten geography, a grade nine language class, a remedial history and one section of music. So, your job as a music teacher is to get out there and promote your program. You trot the band and the choir and the guitar class out to the feeder schools and get them to sign up for music. Sure, extra-curricular activities are voluntary, but if you want people to take music, you kinda HAVE to do those things. You trot out those same groups at school assemblies. You get the kids who currently take music to brow-beat and arm-twist their friends into taking it, etc. It's not that whether or not you have a job depends on it. It's that the job you want depends on it. The flipside of that is that you can, with a good amount of motivation, create your own job.

But... for goodness sake.... for your sake, for your future students' sake, for the sake of your friends who will have to endure your moaning and complaining, for the sake of your future family and children who will bear the brunt of your misery..... do NOT go into teaching as a fallback.

By all means.... do it. But do it because you want to. Nothing else.

Ironically, getting a job as a music teacher provides you with little luxury to spend time doing your own music or pursuing your own musical interests. Especially once you have a family. If you haven't seen Mr. Holland's opus, get it and do so. That movie may be the most 'real teacher' movie I have ever seen. (you know.... save for the rather Hollywood ending) You'll see how much time he spends doing music for him. It's not that he doesn't want to.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#19
Quote by TheWho2
so you are teaching? or are u still in school? If your still in school what is your major?


I am still in school, and I'm specifically a Guitar Performance major. I teach through the school as my job. It's not all bad, there's good things about it, and as I already said (I think I did) it's a rewarding feeling when a student starts to improve. I just can't see myself doing it as a full on career. I mean any sort of job music related, is better than a job that has nothing to do with music in my opinion, but it's still not what I'd choose foremost. And for the record, I'm not actually sure what my plan is after college or what career to specifically pursue. I'm not really in school to get the degree, I'm just there to get better.
Quote by acjshapiro

Quote by Vrstone87

meh, I've listened to every radiohead album and honestly don't get what everyone loves about them.....


cause you're ****ing stupid

#21
Quote by alexcp94
why


because music majors don't make shit for money (unless they use their degree to do something else) and you don't want to be a poor miserable retard musician in debt.
#22
Quote by CodeMelon
because music majors don't make shit for money (unless they use their degree to do something else) and you don't want to be a poor miserable retard musician in debt.


Do you know ANYTHING about majoring in music?

One of my teachers plays in a brass quintet and teaches lessons and does souley those two things for a living. He makes $80,000 a year
#23
I'm pretty sure at the University of Arizona they have some sort of degree in guitar, or music theory. I do not know the specific name of it, but I do know my guitar teacher majored in it. Check into that possibly?