#1
Well, I've been playing guitar for a year now, (On an incredibly cheap korean squier fender jaguar very badly dameged, etc guitar), and I've decided that I like bass better.

Everytime I listen to a song, i listen to the bass more, and also I think guitar is overrated (in a sense). However, I think I want to learn the bass now.

But, I have little questions.

1) I know the basics of guitar, power chords, some chords, ska chords and strumming, that's basically it. Oh, and a scale and some easy solos (Ex: Smells Like Teen Spirit). Anyways, Would I have to re-learn a basic for bass (yes, I know there's no chords or power chords or ska strumming, just, do I need like, new techniques and stuff?)

2) I'M thinking of buying a Squier "Stop Dreaming Start playing!" bass pack, is that OK?

3) I'm going to be playing punk rock and ska and maybe reggae, and I'll learn slapstyle bass. Now, as of now, I know nothing about bass, my only experience with it is playing bass riffs on the first four strings of a guitar (which I love btw). Anything I should now?

4) Anything else I should know before making my mind and buying?

Thanks,
-Rancid Ivy
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#2
Bass is the easy way out!

Also, Guitar is more interesting than Bass, nobody ever looks at the bassist on stage.
Fender Deluxe Players Stratocaster
Epiphone G-400
Laney VC30
Boss DS-2
#3
...I'm not trying to learn bass because I'm bad at guitar man, I just don't like guitar that much period, and I always seemed to like bass better.

And, I frankly don't give a damn who the **** looks at me onstage, I just wanna play music.
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#4
Here's my two cents:
If you're gonna learn bass, learn to play finger style. A lot of bassists just use picks and they get hated on for it. Even if you decide you like using a pick more than your fingers you still need to know how to play finger style. Which if your gonna learn slap bass, you are probably gonna learn finger-style.

Also, if you can already play guitar, there are not many techniques you will need to learn to start playing bass. The main thing is just stretching farther because of bigger spaces between frets.
The Squier pack will be good for a start.

And remember, bass does not play the same role as a guitar. Make sure you know the purpose of bass, which if you are listening to the bass in songs more, you'll learn that. Bass can be stupid simple or very complex, don't be afraid to do either one.
#5
Quote by ibanez87
Here's my two cents:
If you're gonna learn bass, learn to play finger style. A lot of bassists just use picks and they get hated on for it. Even if you decide you like using a pick more than your fingers you still need to know how to play finger style. Which if your gonna learn slap bass, you are probably gonna learn finger-style.

Also, if you can already play guitar, there are not many techniques you will need to learn to start playing bass. The main thing is just stretching farther because of bigger spaces between frets.
The Squier pack will be good for a start.

And remember, bass does not play the same role as a guitar. Make sure you know the purpose of bass, which if you are listening to the bass in songs more, you'll learn that. Bass can be stupid simple or very complex, don't be afraid to do either one.

Yeah, I was learning on playing fingerstyle, and, is the role of the bass in the band to keep rythm and stuff? Cuz that's what I thaught...
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#6
Quote by Rancid Ivy
Yeah, I was learning on playing fingerstyle, and, is the role of the bass in the band to keep rythm and stuff? Cuz that's what I thaught...

Yes, the bass is part of the rhythm section. The bass and the drums should be tight together and should compliment each other. The bass is the low end of music (obviously). Most of time, it should fill out the sound by giving it some bottom end.

What the bass plays can totally change the total sound of something. For instance, say the guitar plays a D major chord. the bass can play a D note and it sounds just fine. But if the bass hits a F sharp note, it can make the chord have a different texture to it, even though the guitar hasn't changed the chord.
#7
that's awesome.

oh, and btw, what'S this I've been hearing about cabinets and stuff.

Would I be able to play a live performance with just a bass and a bass amp?
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#8
Quote by Rancid Ivy
that's awesome.

oh, and btw, what'S this I've been hearing about cabinets and stuff.

Would I be able to play a live performance with just a bass and a bass amp?

If the bass amp is loud enoguh you can. The Squier amp is probably not loud enough, but I don't know for sure.

There's didn't types of amp setups.
See you can have can get a head (which is the actual amplifier part) and connect it to some bass cabinets (which have speakers) and do it like that. Or you can get both in one amp, which is called a combo amp. Combo amps are amps with speakers in them. I recommend a combo amp. My bassist uses a Line 6 combo amp and it works fine but some people prefer to use heads and cabs separately.
I know a bassist who doesn't use a bass amp at all. Hey plugs into a Tech 21 Sans Amp Bass Driver and then goes into the P.A. and it sounds great.
Last edited by ibanez87 at Oct 19, 2009,
#9
Well, sorry if I'm being pesty, but...

Quote by Wikipedia Article
He plays through an avalon DI box into an Ampeg Svt 5 or 4 Pro into Ampeg 8x10 cabs.


What are "boxes" and "8x10 cabs"?

I really AM a noob in this stuff lol...
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#10
Ok, first off, bass is a completely different animal from guitar, they just happen to look the same, and as such, the technique and theory should be treated differently

Your going to want to learn all three "strumming" for lack of a better word, techniques, i.e. fingerstyle, slap, and pick, but start off with whatever feels most comfortable for you.
When it comes to actually starting to learn material, please take this advice: learn bass theory early on. Do not go out and start learning how to play off of tabs, or you will be playing off tabs forever, and your ability to improvise will suffer. The best advice I can give is to find a teacher, nothing will do you better then having someone experienced to learn from.

When it comes to starter basses, I would say stay away from starter packs. Your better off buying an Ibanez GSR200, a Squier Vintage Modified Precision or Jazz bass, if your budget extends to that range. The starter pack Squiers are the affinity series, which suffers quality-wise in comparison to other starter basses, and the bass amps in the packs aren't really worth it. You would be much better off buying a separate practice amp.

EDIT: in answer to your previous question, an 8x10 cab is a cabinet with eight 10 inch speakers in it.

Oh, and sorry bout the wall of text haha
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
Last edited by Tostitos at Oct 19, 2009,
#11
Quote by Rancid Ivy
Well, sorry if I'm being pesty, but...


What are "boxes" and "8x10 cabs"?

I really AM a noob in this stuff lol...


the "Ampeg Svt 5 or 4 Pro" is the head (see above post)

the cabs are the speakers where the sound actually comes out of. Without the cabs, the head would be useless. But like I said, u can get a combo amp and get a head and speakers all in one.

Im not sure about the DI box (DI stands for direct)but I think it connects the head and cabs to the P.A. (which is necessary to make it louder, or so that the sound man can control the volume). The alternative method to the DI box is putting a microphone up to the cabs.
#12
Quote by Necr0maniac
Bass is the easy way out!

Also, Guitar is more interesting than Bass, nobody ever looks at the bassist on stage.


Bitch best be trolling. If you're sincerely not being the dumbass troll you've just made yourself out to be, explain your argument.
#13
Thanls ibanez and obeythepenguin
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#15
Quote by Necr0maniac
Bass is the easy way out!

Also, Guitar is more interesting than Bass, nobody ever looks at the bassist on stage.


Which is why nobody ever expects the bassist to sneak up behind them, and wrap a 4-foot long plank of wood with strings on, around their head. Thus is the way of Bass-jitsu, gaijin. Learn it well, and be wary of bassists.

DI = Direct Injection. The DI box has a transformer in it, which allows for a clean, balanced signal to be sent to the PA or recording desk. Some are simply that; others, like Tech 21 and MXR offer more functions - typically some gain and EQ control.
#16
^
sorely tempted to sig that first part lol
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#17
the biggest thing I can stress is to learn your theory! Know what notes are in what chord and how the scales work and all that. Also learn fingerstyle, you probably have picking down if you've been playing guitar, but finger style is essential if you want to play reggae. ska you could finger or pick, and punk should be picked. These of course are vast generalizations and you should really do what you want, but most people want the smoother tone of fingerstyle in their reggae and harsher attack in their punk.

but yeah learn your bass and use it well. And listen to some chocking victem, they have great bass runs. (500 channels and five finger discount are both awesome)
no sir away a papaya war is on
#18
^The man makes a good point.

You aren't a guitarist now, you have to actually learn how to play your instrument.
There is nothing better in this world than having a conversation with an arrogant metalhead guitarist who thinks that he is better than you simply because of the instrumentation... then about half way through the conversation starting to talk about deep music theory and watching them squirm.

Then you have a few hours of fun while they try to justify not knowing anything.
#19
sounds a bit like me...

bass is fun. ive been learning from the hal leonard book (but ive been lazy recently) and thats pretty good at the steps, i know a few on here recommend it.

enjoy it
#20
Allright, bass is the best part of the music in my opinion! You don't want to jump up and dance without it, and it loses it's feel. I think you're on the right track. If you can play guitar, you can definately play the bass. Just don't forget to make it fun, not just repetetive notes or else you're a loser!
#21
Quote by Necr0maniac
Bass is the easy way out!

Also, Guitar is more interesting than Bass, nobody ever looks at the bassist on stage.


People like you are what's wrong with modern music.


On the subject of playing pick vs. fingers, play what you prefer. It really is best to be fluent with both though, especially if you're a clumsy git like me. I love the attack of a pick but I keep dropping them.
#22
FYI--the troll has been warned folks.

One of the best things you can buy after your amp and bass is a good thick strap and a metronome. Both will serve you well.

Your back and technique will thank you for the strap. Your fretting hand needs to be freed up for fretting not holding up the neck. It will also help you get the bass into a position that is comfortable and you can develop the finger stretch needed to play.

A bass player is a member of the rhythm section. You have to be consistent and in the groove at all times. You have the awesome power of making or breaking the band. Ergo, the metronome advice. Use it all the time when you practice. From there graduate to drum loops and if you can find a drummer to jam with, that's the ideal.
#23
Quote by anarkee
FYI--the troll has been warned folks.

One of the best things you can buy after your amp and bass is a good thick strap and a metronome. Both will serve you well.

Your back and technique will thank you for the strap. Your fretting hand needs to be freed up for fretting not holding up the neck. It will also help you get the bass into a position that is comfortable and you can develop the finger stretch needed to play.

A bass player is a member of the rhythm section. You have to be consistent and in the groove at all times. You have the awesome power of making or breaking the band. Ergo, the metronome advice. Use it all the time when you practice. From there graduate to drum loops and if you can find a drummer to jam with, that's the ideal.


I sorta got rythm already though, (mainly because I was rythm guitar and also a drummer for a short period of time), but thanks for the advice!
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#24
Quote by Necr0maniac
Bass is the easy way out!

Also, Guitar is more interesting than Bass, nobody ever looks at the bassist on stage.


mabey with some bands but triviums bassist is constantly running jumping or moving in some way and he deffinetly catches you attention.
#25
Quote by obeythepenguin
^ I, for one, am less interested in stage presence than in what one is actually playing.


A bit off topic but I think the image of the band on stage is just as important as the music. If live music were all about the sound people would just stay at home and listen to music on a CD player. That way they can have a comfy seat not be surrounded by sweaty people.
#26
Quote by Necr0maniac
Bass is the easy way out!

Also, Guitar is more interesting than Bass, nobody ever looks at the bassist on stage.



The UG bass guitar forum hates you.

Guitard
Gear:
Squier Classic Vibe
Acoustic B20

Favorite Bands:
Green Day
Sublime
NOFX
#27
Well, I can successfully play the James Bond, Pink Panther, and Mario themes on my cousin's bass
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#28
Quote by Rancid Ivy
Well, I can successfully play the James Bond, Pink Panther, and Mario themes on my cousin's bass


Ahh, but can you slap the Undeground part?
#29
Quote by Spaz91
Ahh, but can you slap the Undeground part?


Noo
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#30
On the subjects of theme songs to learn:
Star Wars Imperial Theme, just cause its awesome

...and the Zelda theme
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#31
Guys, I have a little question:

This is for playing with a pick. Do I have to play down AND upstrokes? Cuz I only play downstrokes but people (mainly my cousin), told me I have bad technique...
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#32
Quote by Rancid Ivy
Guys, I have a little question:

This is for playing with a pick. Do I have to play down AND upstrokes? Cuz I only play downstrokes but people (mainly my cousin), told me I have bad technique...
It's not necessary but if you want to play anything quickly you pretty much have to, so it's best to start doing it now.
#33
Quote by Steve08
It's not necessary but if you want to play anything quickly you pretty much have to, so it's best to start doing it now.

Well, I've been playing punk rock guitar for a while (ya know, power heavy down strokesd at breakneck speeds?) and now I got that in my mind.

I mean, the max I can do with downstrokes is really fast, but I know that too go faster I'll need to.

Basically:

I can only use downstrokes, but when it gets too fast I'll need upstrokes too right?
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#34
the downstrokes are good for punk guitar, but in bass it is bad technique. the reason people do downstrokes on guitar is because the power chords sound beeter with downstrokes, but with bass a downstroke sounds the same as an upstroke. So you get no advantages from just downstroking on bass. I suggest you lkearn alternate picking.
no sir away a papaya war is on
#35
Quote by the_perdestrian
the downstrokes are good for punk guitar, but in bass it is bad technique. the reason people do downstrokes on guitar is because the power chords sound beeter with downstrokes, but with bass a downstroke sounds the same as an upstroke. So you get no advantages from just downstroking on bass. I suggest you lkearn alternate picking.

Disagree: Reason being Metallica. James Hetfield plays downstrokes on riffs that are fast (8th notes at about 200BPM?), but not ridiculously fast, regardless of whether or not they're chords (ex, Master of Puppets riffs). Jason Newsted did the same, except with much less chords. I would never consider downstroking 'bad' technique, but I would say it helps with more consistent sounding notes.
Last edited by edgeyyz at Oct 22, 2009,
#36
Quote by Rancid Ivy
Well, I've been playing punk rock guitar for a while (ya know, power heavy down strokesd at breakneck speeds?) and now I got that in my mind.

I mean, the max I can do with downstrokes is really fast, but I know that too go faster I'll need to.

Basically:

I can only use downstrokes, but when it gets too fast I'll need upstrokes too right?
As fast as you can go with downstrokes, you will be able to go twice as fast easily with alternate picking. Plus playing triplets would probably be almost IMPOSSIBLE...

While you can work on it and get quite good at it, like someone mentioned James Hetfield, it's pretty much a speed limit but does sound more aggressive.
Last edited by Steve08 at Oct 22, 2009,
#37
yeah I probably shouldn't have said "bad technique." edgyy is right that downstoking is just fine, but you should still learn alternate. it will double your stamina and allow you to play faster. If you want to play downstrokes at a moderate pace go for it, but when you want to really fly, go for alternate.
no sir away a papaya war is on
#38
Okay, thanks for all the advice!
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss