#1
Well, I started to learn playing an electric guitar some time ago, but I don't read notes yet.

In terms of actual "lessons", I have one hour per week, so it doesn't sound too sufficient for quick learning.

It's not like there are so much notes, and the most obvious thing about the guitar is that they mostly repeat themselves on different frets, and so probably the more difficult part is memorizing their positioning.


If there's a good guide to learn note reading from (and for guitar, more specifically), it could help.


Thanks in advance.
Last edited by UserN123 at Oct 20, 2009,
#2
Quote by UserN123

If there's a good guide to learn note reading from (and for guitar, more specifically), it could help.





www.musictheory.net

will help you with reading sheet music

as for the bolded part, in classical guitar playing you play the notes in open postion (unless otherwise noted). but you can seach for fingerings that would make it easier if you just take the time.
#4
Well, I said that I have an electric guitar, but anyway - The main purpose of EVERY guitar is that you produce the different notes (pitches) by pressing the frets.
#5
Quote by UserN123
Well, I said that I have an electric guitar, but anyway - The main purpose of EVERY guitar is that you produce the different notes (pitches) by pressing the frets.


i know you have an electric guitar, but i said that a classical guitarist would normally play the notes in open position, there is nothing stopping you from doing the same thing on an electric.

or as i also said, you could learn the notes on the neck like the back of your hand and be able to play the same thing in many different fingerings.
#6
I still don't get your first sentence. Since when do you play everything in "open position"? That only gives you 6 different tones.

And as I said in the post, the main thing with the fretting is that many of the notes just repeat themselves many times in different positions.


But I looked at that "note game" they have on the website (you have a staff that displays a full note each time on a different area and you need to point out what note is it) and than I had another thought.

Because each half-way from line to line notes a one-note progress, it doesn't necessarily means a tone difference. As some notes only have a semitone different between them, writing one as sharp or flat could basically notate for the same tone as the nearby note?
#7
open postion (or first position) is when you primarily use the first 4 frets.

but this method wont always work, for example if there are fast passages with wide stretches involved.

Edit:
standard notes on a staff cover all natural notes (no sharps or flats), the only way to notate one note as the same as another one would be to include double flats or double sharps, or if you sharpen a B (to B#) or E (to E#) etc. yet although these notes are sound the same, they emply different harmonic function, making them theoretically different.
Last edited by MapOfYourHead at Oct 20, 2009,
#8
Learning to read sheet music isn't hard, musictheory.net, is a good place to start(I believe someone has posted that already, but w/e). But the next thing is to learn to play those notes on the guitar, and I believe this (http://www.yamahamusicsoft.com/en/instrument/Guitar/product/1010160) can help with that.
#10
You can find many free charts on the internet that show you what notes are on what string/fret such as http://www.thomasvoigt.de/en/gbrett_en.gif

Generally, you learn the notes on the fretboard for a single position. In other words you learn to play the notes across the fretboard with out changing the position of your hand.
#11
I didn't understand that "cover all natural notes" thing you said.

You can change the note a semitone up or down by using sharp or flat. That's a part of notation, obviously.


But what I said was that as the major scale (C D E F G A B?) progresses with Tone-Tone-Semitone-Tone-Tone-Tone-Semitone, the difference from E to F, for example, should be a semitone, and so - Writing an E# is like an F, as far as I concern.
#12
Quote by UserN123
I didn't understand that "cover all natural notes" thing you said.

You can change the note a semitone up or down by using sharp or flat. That's a part of notation, obviously.


But what I said was that as the major scale (C D E F G A B?) progresses with Tone-Tone-Semitone-Tone-Tone-Tone-Semitone, the difference from E to F, for example, should be a semitone, and so - Writing an E# is like an F, as far as I concern.

That's where the "different harmonic function" bit comes into play. I could attempt to explain key signatures, the circle of fifths and all other sorts of nifty mumbo-jumbo right here, but you'd be better off looking at some of the great links people have posted.