#1
i've recently been getting into alot of andy mckee stuff, and when i tried to play it i realized i didnt know how to fingerpick at all

what are some good beginner finger picking songs that are good practice for finger picking?

also can you recommend any good tutorials or advice that will teach me how to finger pick properly
equipment:
Esp EC-1000
ibanez rg550
Peavey 5150 combo
Boss ML-2 Metal core pedal
DB-01 crybaby from hell

Quote by dubstar92
Tell the friend that due to an amp explosion you are now temporarily deaf and will judge her friend solely on looks.
#4
what are some good songs to practice with?
equipment:
Esp EC-1000
ibanez rg550
Peavey 5150 combo
Boss ML-2 Metal core pedal
DB-01 crybaby from hell

Quote by dubstar92
Tell the friend that due to an amp explosion you are now temporarily deaf and will judge her friend solely on looks.
#5
I dont know... Stairway to heaven? /cliche
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#6
Into the Night - Newton Falkner
Blackbird - The Beatles
Pentatonic and Chromatic scales (quickly)
and another fave of mine, its a bit harder Allegretto in C minor by Beethoven
Music is an art form that celebrates potential. So long as you're looking for it, you'll always find it.
#7
I would recommend Is There Anybody Out There by Pink Floyd. Take it slow and easy, fingerpicking with a steel strung will increase your right finger strength tremendously.
#8
Make sure you always assign a finger to a string (e.g.):

Thumb plays Bass E, A and possibly D.
Index plays G
Middle plays B
Ring plays E
Thumb strums full chords, obviously.

etc. etc.

My instructor ONLY finger picks and uses his thumb, index and middle fingers only. I use my thumb, index, middle and ring.

Try playing The Unforgiven intro (acoustic)
Simple Man (finger pick the Shinedown version)
Silent Lucidity (Queensryche)

Tons of songs with rhythmic changes and arpeggios can be finger picked and sound fantastic.

Play the G major scale in the 3rd position starting at the highest note all the way down and up the scale. Once you get the speed up finger picking is extraordinarily efficient and very fast. Good Luck!!
____________________________________________
GEAR:

Ibanez SGT520VS Sage Series Acoustic
Yamaha FG720S-12 12 String Acoustic
Schecter C-1 Classic
Crate Flexwave FW65 Combo Amp
#9
Quote by skywalker45
Make sure you always assign a finger to a string (e.g.):

Thumb plays Bass E, A and possibly D.
Index plays G
Middle plays B
Ring plays E
Thumb strums full chords, obviously.

etc. etc.


I would say you don't have assign your fingers to specific strings, only at the beginning to get a feel. Much like with alternate picking with a pick, as you progress, you should be able to alternate finger pick on the same string. BTW, a good fingerpicking exercise is this classical spanish piece right here:

http://www.classtab.org/zanroman.txt

Usually played on a classical nylon string, but nonetheless still playable on a steel strung. Watch some youtube vids to get an idea, start slow. Not only is it beautiful, you will develop good strength and movement on your right hand. Plus, popular with the ladies
#10
Quote by berktt
http://www.classtab.org/zanroman.txt

Usually played on a classical nylon string, but nonetheless still playable on a steel strung. Watch some youtube vids to get an idea, start slow. Not only is it beautiful, you will develop good strength and movement on your right hand. Plus, popular with the ladies



mmmmmm nuff said there BTW that piece is amazing for those who haven't heard it. Great post berktt!!!!
____________________________________________
GEAR:

Ibanez SGT520VS Sage Series Acoustic
Yamaha FG720S-12 12 String Acoustic
Schecter C-1 Classic
Crate Flexwave FW65 Combo Amp
#11
The first song I ever learned to finger pick was "Landslide" by Fleetwood Mac, and is a good song for beginners. Another great one that isn't very hard is "Dust In The Wind" by Kansas. Even if you don't like those songs they are great vehicles for learning the technique. Another one I just learned is "Guaranteed" by Eddie Vedder from the Into The Wild soundtrack.

The technique I learned from my teacher though is to still use your pick when you're fingerpicking, and use your two middle fingers for the additional picking(I never really use my pinky). The upside to this is it makes going from fingerpicking to playing power chords and harder strumming an easy transition, as opposed to holding the pick in your mouth or something. There is no downside because you're not really missing out on anything by not having your thumb and pointer work individually. Pretty much anything you can play with all your fingers you can play with a pick and two fingers if your technique is right.
#13
Quote by guitarmy21b

The technique I learned from my teacher though is to still use your pick when you're fingerpicking, and use your two middle fingers for the additional picking(I never really use my pinky). The upside to this is it makes going from fingerpicking to playing power chords and harder strumming an easy transition, as opposed to holding the pick in your mouth or something. There is no downside because you're not really missing out on anything by not having your thumb and pointer work individually. Pretty much anything you can play with all your fingers you can play with a pick and two fingers if your technique is right.


This is called hybrid picking. It's out there, some people do it, but it's not that popular. It has its pros and cons.

The only pro for me from this technique is that using a pick you can get a very nice tone with the attack to the string. Also, I suppose you can fingerpick and strum with a pick while playing a song.

The cons are that it is hard to get used to and develop this technique. In addition, since you're going to need to hold the pick between the p and i fingers ( meaning thumb and index fingers ), you won't be able to pick with them, and really, the p and i fingers are the most useful fingers in any fingerpicking scenario. Also like it has been said, you can count out the pinky, it is not commonly used as it is much weaker and smaller than the rest of your fingers. So that leaves you with two fingers to pick with, and even then, you won't get the same flexibility and dexterity as when you're not holding a pick.

Well I'm sounding like a naysayer for this technique, it's just not for me as I mostly play classical style with long finger nails. Get out there, experiment by all means! That is exactly how composers like Andy McKee got to where they are now But to be able to play like him watch his videos carefully and look at all the techniques he deploys in his songs. Drifting, for example. He uses a lot of tapping in this song, which is when you sound a string by simply hammering on to the desired fret without plucking or picking the string. To be able to get a decent sound from this method, especially with a steel-strung, you need lots of practice. Look in to some exercises.
#14
Quote by berktt
This is called hybrid picking. It's out there, some people do it, but it's not that popular. It has its pros and cons.

The only pro for me from this technique is that using a pick you can get a very nice tone with the attack to the string. Also, I suppose you can fingerpick and strum with a pick while playing a song.

The cons are that it is hard to get used to and develop this technique. In addition, since you're going to need to hold the pick between the p and i fingers ( meaning thumb and index fingers ), you won't be able to pick with them, and really, the p and i fingers are the most useful fingers in any fingerpicking scenario. Also like it has been said, you can count out the pinky, it is not commonly used as it is much weaker and smaller than the rest of your fingers. So that leaves you with two fingers to pick with, and even then, you won't get the same flexibility and dexterity as when you're not holding a pick.

Well I'm sounding like a naysayer for this technique, it's just not for me as I mostly play classical style with long finger nails. Get out there, experiment by all means! That is exactly how composers like Andy McKee got to where they are now But to be able to play like him watch his videos carefully and look at all the techniques he deploys in his songs. Drifting, for example. He uses a lot of tapping in this song, which is when you sound a string by simply hammering on to the desired fret without plucking or picking the string. To be able to get a decent sound from this method, especially with a steel-strung, you need lots of practice. Look in to some exercises.


Hybrid picking, that's it! Forgot the name of it. I suppose it's not for everyone. I enjoy it though. Probably the biggest pro from doing it is like you said, being able to strum and pick during a song, which I incorporate into my original songs quite a bit. It sounds awesome. It's pretty hard to get that same strum tone with your thumb unless you're Jeff Beck.
#17
Quote by GuitarGuitar
Road Trippin' by RHCP is a good one.



I most definitely agree. There are only a few parts to the songs which I learned a while back. It is a little difficult at first, but practice makes perfect. Also, I should mention that look through all the tabs and guitar pro files to find the best one, because I remember a lot of them sucked ass. And after you master the song, try singing along for added bonus People think singing along to strumming is hard, try fingerpicking songs
#18
Quote by ChadHydro
Naked As We Came by Iron and Wine: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nd-A-iiPoLg


I just checked this out, love the song, very straightforward fingerpicking pattern, thank you Playing this just made me think of another song for fingerpicking - Street Spirit by Radiohead. Usually played with a pick, it is even easier to play with your fingers.