#1
Something is awfully weird about the way that this terminology is being used here, perhaps someone can tell me if I'm wrong on this issue.

I'm under the impression that all higher-range non-falsetto sounds can be created with a combination of head and chest voice, rather than head alone. Whilst you may use your head voice alone, it creates a "breathy, wispy" sound which is not appropriate for all circumstances. Therefore if you wish to employ a more "powerful, fuller" sound on your highest note, you would employ a combination of head and chest voice.

Using this reasoning, the highest your voice can go before reaching falsetto can still be made using your chest voice. It's working in combination with your head voice.

So why exactly are people claiming they have different ranges for head and chest voice?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#2
I'm a newbie, but my understanding is that you do have separate ranges for head and chest. You're right that higher notes are using a combination of head and chest, but as you go higher you're going to be using increasingly less chest and more head... at some point you've reached the limits of chest voice and it's all head...

The range people say for chest as I've understood it, is using chest only, and range for head is a combination of head and chest.

I'm posting this as much to either be corrected or to get validation that I understand it correctly as I am to answer your question...
#3
See, the problem with the terminologies of 'head voice' and 'chest voice' is that they suggest an exclusivity.

You never sing with *just* chest voice or *just* head voice. Your lowest notes will resonate mostly in the chest cavity with little resonation in the sinuses, and your highest notes will resonate mostly in the sinuses with little resonance in the chest, but there is always a mix.

Throw in the term 'mixed' voice into the mix (so to speak....) and you're only asking for confusion.

Your natural voice should always be a combination of these two resonances.

Falsetto is when the voice is formed entirely within the head, I think which only furthers the confusion between head voice and falsetto.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
I see. When people claim to use a "head voice" to get a higher range, what they are actually doing is predominantly using the resonance in the nasal cavities, but with training they could also introduce more chest to get the "full sound" I was referring to.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
Not exactly. Those higher notes will just not happen when you have the wrong balance between head and chest resonance. At best, the tone and focus of pitch will be off. At worst, the note will just break up.

Even on your highest notes, or you could even say *especially* on your highest notes, in full voice, you will have a full sound. If it doesn't have a full sound, you are either not singing correctly, or you are in falsetto.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
Quote by axemanchris
Even on your highest notes, or you could even say *especially* on your highest notes, in full voice, you will have a full sound. If it doesn't have a full sound, you are either not singing correctly, or you are in falsetto.

CT


Just to clarify, when you say "full voice" are you referring to a combination of head and chest voice?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#7
yes.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
And therefore, there are no separate head and chest ranges, as ideally you are using a perfect mixture of both.

That's what I thought
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#9
Exactly.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
in my EXTREMELY limited understanding of singing (i am perhaps the only person throughout history to fail highschool choir), i always thought the main difference between head and chest voices was timbre, not pitch, and that the two were often combined depending on the timbre you're trying to achieve. it's as if there were an elevator in your throat, and as the elevator goes down, you mix in more chest voice. so, to the singers, is this accurate?
#11
The difference, if you insist on using those misleading terms, is where the resonance is happening.

Because you have chest resonance and sinus resonance, the two will sound different - will have that different timbre you were referring to. But you will never hear them singly. Remember, there will always be a mix when you are using your natural voice correctly.

Now, to use your analogy of the elevator, as the elevator goes down, you use more chest resonance and less sinus resonance. As the elevator goes up, you use more sinus resonance and less chest resonance.

It's not a perfect analogy, but here is another one. Think of a stereo system. Woofers alone sound like crap. Tweeters alone sound worse. Lower notes will be projected from the woofers, but there will always be those overtones created in the tweeters to round it out and to add dimension. Vice-versa for high notes in the tweeters.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
ok, i think that's pretty much what i was thinking... those terms are just the way it was described to me, but i get what you're saying.