#1
Well, after sitting in with a few songs at a local bar/Café, and befriending the Brazilian owner, I've been offered an hour-long gig, before one of his regulars. I'm a solo acoustic singer type. It's my first complete gig, especially singing - I've played a few one-song things as lead guitarist, sang and played two songs with my guitar teacher at this bar, and last week, the owner invited me up to sing with a jazz band playing, so nerves are... mastered, ish.

I've made a FaceBook event thing, invited almost everyone I know in the area

I've got a setlist printed out, I've got all the lyrics printed out. I know the songs, so that's OK. The owner is a drummer, he's said he'll accompany me, which is good, because he's great.

Any advice, tips to make this go smoothly?
#3
a shot of whiskey before the show calms the nerves. or 2 shots. no, make it 4 shots
#4
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#5
Stay loose, and groove to the music, not the setlist.

I find that if I try to play the songs exactly as they lie on my set list/song structure I miss out on a lot of great opportunities to improv, especially with new players. Everyones different, but this is my opinion on the matter.

Have fun BROOOOOO!!!!!
"You can drink an ugly chick hot, but you can’t drink a fat chick skinny."

Fender: HSS Stratocaster

Modulus: 1991 Q5

Peavey:158BASS
Marshall: MG30FDX
Acoustic: B200
#6
Even if you're playing alone?

That reminds me - what sort of stage presence can you have when you're sitting down, tied to a mic, with a fat guitar on your lap? Aside from tilting my head and leaning about a bit :P
#7
If it's a small gig, don't be all "YEAH WE'RE THIS BAND AND WE'RE HERE TO KICK ASS". Engage with the crowd, and have a good time. Will be less awkward for everyone that way!

Have fun, is the main thing.
#8
I like to tell jokes, talk about the venue and just try to mix in a bit of comedy. Its always engaging to see someone tell stories about thier songs, and generally love what it is that they do. Watch some acoustic sets on Youtube and take some pointers from what seems to work.
1981 Gibson Les Paul Custom (Black Beauty)
1980 Marshall JMP 2204
#9
GABCD,

A Brazilian owner? Get paid in advance.

Just kidding.

Sharing your music with others is what being a musician is all about. Relax and have fun. If you play a cover, give credit to the writer/artist of the song. Ask the crowd for requests. (If this scares you, have one of your friends request a song you know really well) Thank the crowd for letting you into their lives with your music.

Rock on, Brother.
Dish
#10
Make sure you practice the entire set at home a couple of times. Even practice telling stories between the songs and time it so it takes an hour. If this is the first time that you have played live for longer than 5 minutes, without practicing the set at home you may become physically exhausted.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#11
Quote by Cloudburst
Engage with the crowd, and have a good time. Will be less awkward for everyone that way!

Have fun, is the main thing.


+1. Connection with the crowd is pretty important, as it'll help them relate to your music, and most importantly, to you.

Quote by Jonny Ryan Mac

I like to tell jokes, talk about the venue and just try to mix in a bit of comedy. Its always engaging to see someone tell stories about thier songs, and generally love what it is that they do. Watch some acoustic sets on Youtube and take some pointers from what seems to work.


Also a great tip. John mayer is especially good to look up for this kind of stuff, and much of his audience turn up to see his comedy.
#12
Relax and remember the number one performance rule, if you mess up DON'T stop and apologize etc. Oh, and keep the audience interested
#13
Quote by AlanHB
Make sure you practice the entire set at home a couple of times. Even practice telling stories between the songs and time it so it takes an hour. If this is the first time that you have played live for longer than 5 minutes, without practicing the set at home you may become physically exhausted.


I've done it, I think, all in one go, once or twice, but usually, I only get to the halfway point before being called away. I think my voice can take it, I don't strain.

@Dishburn - I'm half Brazilian.

@Requests. I had considered it - getting someone to specifically request my next song is a good idea, I suppose, hadn't thought of it. Won't it look artificial?
#14
I'm not a big fan of telling jokes. Ya know like two chickens walked into a bar type thing. But talked to people. Tell them something funny that happened to you the other day. If it's an original song, tell them the story behind it. I find some of my songs make a bigger impact and make people listen more when they know the story behind it.

Just relax, have fun with it, and enjoy yourself. Do just be a stone sitting on a chair with a guitar in your hand.
#15
The biggest thing to remember about screwing up is to pretend you never screwed up. Just go with it and forget about it. Playing gigs is about having fun and playing music. Just groove with it, man.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#16
All you can do is make sure the set is a rehearsed as much as is humanly possible, especially any parts that you are jamming with the owner. That part of it is all about preperation.

The actual gig though is all about keeping a lid on your nerves because if you're well prepaired, then that's the only thing that can screw the gig up for you (apart from gear screwing up but you already know to make sure that your gear is up to scratch and that you have a spare guitar available in case of breakdowns or string breakage. )

Try to remember that all you are doing is exactly what you have done countless times before in rehearsal, only in front of people, so it really should be a doddle. Imagine that instead of performing in front of strangers, you are actualy playing informaly for a small group of friends, relax, as if you've just picked a guitar at a party and are playing purely for the fun of it. (which of course, you essentially are)

The more you enjoy yourself, the more that enjoyment will come across to the audience, it's kinda infectious.