#2
Think of it like this, what's the point of learning how to read if you don't understand what you're reading.

So what's the point of playing music if you don't understand what you're playing.


www.musictheory.net is BY FAR the best theory site I've ever seen. It's free, simple, nice-looking and slow going. Just start at the first lesson!
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#3
Quote by Doodleface
Think of it like this, what's the point of learning how to read if you don't understand what you're reading.

So what's the point of playing music if you don't understand what you're playing.


www.musictheory.net is BY FAR the best theory site I've ever seen. It's free, simple, nice-looking and slow going. Just start at the first lesson!



Because it sounds good. That's like saying whats the point of listening to music if you don't 'understand' what your hearing.
#4
its a lot easier to sound good when you understand how and why things sound good. Theory helps this.

Also theory is a major help in composing, transcribing and jamming/improvising.
^Note: Probably sarcastic
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Last edited by Deep*Kick at Oct 21, 2009,
#5
Quote by Deep*Kick

Also theory is a major help in composing, transcribing and jamming/improvising.


this
#6
Quote by Deep*Kick
its a lot easier to sound good when you understand how and why things sound good. Theory helps this.

Also theory is a major help in composing, transcribing and jamming/improvising.
and communicating with other musicians.

Music theory is basically a knowledge-base built up over the years of what works and why - so why go through the pain of re-inventing it for yourself when someone else has already done it for you?

And I'd start here: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=58DA70A2123C71CD&search_query=freepower+ug+theory with Freepower's theory vids.
#8
I didn't touch theory the first year I played guitar. Around the time I started to get into writing my own material I started to understand what the hype was all about. Sure, you might be able to sit down and come up with a lick or two just by listening, but it's considerably harder to write a song for two guitarists and a bass player that all comes together nicely without understanding some theory. Just the concepts of octaves, root notes, keys, and scales around which a song is built really help you make very cool songs. I'm still not an expert even though I've learned far more than I ever imagined in the past few years. The more you know, the better your material can be.
Andy Fox
Hard rock guitarist
I play a Jackson DK-2 and an Ibanez RG through a Peavey 6505+ stack
#9
Learning theory will help you in ways you wouldn't even think of. Even something as easy as learning all the notes on your neck and some scales and chord construction will be hugely useful.
Do it. It'll make you a better musician.

EDIT: Another big thing is communicating with other musicians. If you're reading tabs or just going from memory, and you aren't capable of telling anyone other than a guitarist what chord it is you're playing, or the what notes are in that riff then you might find you won't have too many people interested in playing with you.
With our lives based on the hope for salvation
The humanist paradigm is nothing but a charade
Condemned to inertia: a passive race
We wait and contemplate

Last edited by ApeWeevil at Oct 22, 2009,