#2
No, but I have the TD-9s with the mesh heads. Depending on what you're going to do with them, I'd recommend getting Rolands with mesh heads. I don't think that model is available in mesh.

Alesis makes some reasonably priced mesh head drums like these:

http://www.musiciansbuy.com/Alesis-USB-Pro-Drum-Kit.html

Or if you already have an accoustic set and want to go digital, you can get triggers and a controller. The TD-9 controller is available by itself and it's very versatile.
#4
I have alwase used acoustic kits myself
my friend has one of these and loves it
http://www.samash.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_DTXPLORER%20Electronic%20Drum%20Set%20with%20Bass%20Drum%20Pedal_-1_10052_10002_-49978649_cmCategorySA182855
i've never played it myself though
Last edited by redneckrebel at Oct 22, 2009,
#5
Quote by jetwash69
No, but I have the TD-9s with the mesh heads. Depending on what you're going to do with them, I'd recommend getting Rolands with mesh heads. I don't think that model is available in mesh.

Alesis makes some reasonably priced mesh head drums like these:

http://www.musiciansbuy.com/Alesis-USB-Pro-Drum-Kit.html

Or if you already have an accoustic set and want to go digital, you can get triggers and a controller. The TD-9 controller is available by itself and it's very versatile.

I'm mostly going to use them to learn and play drums at my house, plus recording until I get enough mics for an acoustic set. What's so much better about mesh heads than the regular heads?

And I don't have an acoustic set, nor do I plan on getting one, as I hardly have any room in my house.

Quote by pbiggie
They have them at the store I work at. I don't like them.
This is better and cheaper.http://drums-percussion.musiciansfriend.com/product/Yamaha-DTXplorer-Electronic-Drum-Set?sku=490906

Hmm, that might work. I don't have much room for drums anywhere, so it depends on how big that is.

Quote by redneckrebel
I use acoustic kits and love them and so does the NEIGHBORHOOD


my friend has one of these and loves it though
http://www.samash.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_DTXPLORER%20Electronic%20Drum%20Set%20with%20Bass%20Drum%20Pedal_-1_10052_10002_-49978649_cmCategorySA182855

Acoustic sets are nice, but I don't feel like using earplugs every time I play drums, plus I don't have the space for acoustic drums.
Last edited by Alex Vik at Oct 22, 2009,
#7
Quote by Alex Vik
Hmm, that might work. I don't have much room for drums anywhere, so it depends on how big that is.

My room is very small and I have it sitting in the corner. It doesn't take up too much space.
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Quote by fretsonfire74
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#8
Quote by pbiggie
They have them at the store I work at. I don't like them.
This is better and cheaper.http://drums-percussion.musiciansfriend.com/product/Yamaha-DTXplorer-Electronic-Drum-Set?sku=490906

wow
I just looked and we posted the same kit
#9
Quote by pbiggie
My room is very small and I have it sitting in the corner. It doesn't take up too much space.

I don't have a corner in my room though. I'd need something very small that I could put next to my TV when I'm not playing it.
#10
Quote by redneckrebel
wow
I just looked and we posted the same kit

That's because we're awesome!

Quote by Alex Vik
I don't have a corner in my room though. I'd need something very small that I could put next to my TV when I'm not playing it.

My room is really tiny. There will be a place in your house for this kit.
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Call me Paul. I prefer that.
Quote by fretsonfire74
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#11
You are better off getting the td3 e drums. The pedals are not great even for open hihat i wouldnt like to use one for bd. You can get a cheap td3kw and a mapex bd pedal for £600 now (dunno what that is in dollars).
#13
Quote by Alex Vik
Ok. Can it do double bass?

I haven't tried. The bass drum pad is a bit small but I guess you could fit double bass pedals if you tried.
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Quote by fretsonfire74
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#14
Quote by Alex Vik
I'm mostly going to use them to learn and play drums at my house, plus recording until I get enough mics for an acoustic set. What's so much better about mesh heads than the regular heads?

And I don't have an acoustic set, nor do I plan on getting one, as I hardly have any room in my house.


Hmm, that might work. I don't have much room for drums anywhere, so it depends on how big that is.


Acoustic sets are nice, but I don't feel like using earplugs every time I play drums, plus I don't have the space for acoustic drums.


Mesh heads feel more like the real thing, so if you ever do need to play accoustics it won't be so foreign. Also they'll be more responsive & have better dynamics.

Accoustics can be muted, so you don't need earplugs, but I'm with you, I prefer digital. Meshes will be even quieter than rubber pads.

If you really wanna save space and just learn, all you need are practice pads:
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/DW-Go-Anywhere-Practice-Set?sku=490186
and
practice cymbals (you'll need some stands & a hi-hat stand for these):
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Pintech-5Piece-Practice-Cymbal-Set?sku=444926

But your best bang for the buck investments would be:
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Boss-DB90-Dr.-Beat-Metronome?sku=213017 (on sale!!!! act fast!)
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/HQ-Percussion-2Sided-Speed-and-Workout-Pad?sku=445396
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Hansenfutz-Futz-Practice-Pedal?sku=490586
http://books-videos-music.musiciansfriend.com/product/Hudson-Music-Secret-Weapons-for-the-Modern-Drummer-2-DVD-Set-Jojo-Mayer?sku=942684
and the sticks of your choice

The more elite drum instructors would encourage you to stay away from double base until you get very good--most drummers use that as a crutch.

My daughter is the drummer in our house and 95% of her practice time she just plays on a simple pad and Boss metrenome even though we have the TD-9s.
#15
Quote by jetwash69
Mesh heads feel more like the real thing, so if you ever do need to play accoustics it won't be so foreign. Also they'll be more responsive & have better dynamics.

Accoustics can be muted, so you don't need earplugs, but I'm with you, I prefer digital. Meshes will be even quieter than rubber pads.

If you really wanna save space and just learn, all you need are practice pads:
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/DW-Go-Anywhere-Practice-Set?sku=490186
and
practice cymbals (you'll need some stands & a hi-hat stand for these):
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Pintech-5Piece-Practice-Cymbal-Set?sku=444926

But your best bang for the buck investments would be:
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Boss-DB90-Dr.-Beat-Metronome?sku=213017 (on sale!!!! act fast!)
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/HQ-Percussion-2Sided-Speed-and-Workout-Pad?sku=445396
http://accessories.musiciansfriend.com/product/Hansenfutz-Futz-Practice-Pedal?sku=490586
http://books-videos-music.musiciansfriend.com/product/Hudson-Music-Secret-Weapons-for-the-Modern-Drummer-2-DVD-Set-Jojo-Mayer?sku=942684
and the sticks of your choice

The more elite drum instructors would encourage you to stay away from double base until you get very good--most drummers use that as a crutch.

My daughter is the drummer in our house and 95% of her practice time she just plays on a simple pad and Boss metrenome even though we have the TD-9s.

I've played acoustic sets and electric sets with rubber pads, and it's not too hard for me to switch between the two. Also, it wouldn't be strictly for learning, it would also be for some recording and for when my drummer friend comes over too.
#16
Hey, whatever trips your trigger (pun intended).

Whatever you get, use it in good health.
#17
In my opinion, there's no difference between mesh and rubber heads. I personally prefer rubber heads, because that's what I started with. The idea with the mesh heads is that they're supposed to replicate the feel of an acoustic kit, which they rarely succeed in doing. You don't need a crazy-expensive set to get good stuff. they come with all these options that you'll probably never use. Right now all I have is one of those little Yamaha drum pad things, the one-piece things. It works great for me. I play everything from jazz to death/black metal on it.

On the subject of double bass - it will only be a crutch if you let it be one. I taught myself to play drums, and I started out on a kit with double bass. I learned to use it immediately, but I always practiced using just one as well. As long as you don't rely too heavily, it won't be a problem.
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Last edited by pitobodies at Oct 23, 2009,
#18
Quote by pbiggie
They have them at the store I work at. I don't like them.
This is better and cheaper.http://drums-percussion.musiciansfriend.com/product/Yamaha-DTXplorer-Electronic-Drum-Set?sku=490906

get this, I have a set, they are good. They've lasted me more than a year.
#19
Roland makes great products but you can get kits with more features for the same price. Look into some Alesis kits and that Yamaha kit posted up there. You could also build your own electronic kit. There are lots of tutorials on the internet and you only have to pay for some supplies and a drum module/brain. I would personally go with the Yamaha.

And about the mesh vs rubber. I find that rubber is actually closer to the feel of my snare drum. If I had to use a electric kit then I would use a rubber snare and mesh toms and bass drum.

Also, the Yamaha kit's bass drum is NOT big enough for double kick. I have heard about lots of triggering problems and some of the hits not being picked up because they tried this. You can go buy or make a bigger electronic kick drum though. Roland makes some great electronic kick drums that work awesome with double kick.

Hope I helped. Good luck