#1
I am taking an Engineering C++ Programming class in college, and the textbook we are using for the class really sucks. I know many of you have programming experience so I thought I would ask the Pit, what's a good C++ programming book with lots of examples and practice programs, preferably with solutions?
#6
I prefer internet resources over a particular book any day, because online info stays up to date.

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I P R O G
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#7
Quote by MetalGS3SE
I prefer internet resources over a particular book any day, because online info stays up to date.

programming language syntax doesn't exactly change overnight.
#8
Quote by CoreysMonster
programming language syntax doesn't exactly change overnight.

Obviously, but I meant any book you buy today won't really be 100% helpful a few months down the road. And the online resources are free.

It was the only task I would undertake...

I P R O G
...to reap the harvest that was mine


- [ P R O G - H E A D ? ] -
#9
Quote by MetalGS3SE
Obviously, but I meant any book you buy today won't really be 100% helpful a few months down the road. And the online resources are free.

that's not really true, because programming languages stay the same. C++ isn't really oudated (as far as I know), so a book you bought in '99 about c++ programming is still usable today, because it's still the same language.
But yeah, the internet is better cause it's free
#10
Quote by MetalGS3SE
Obviously, but I meant any book you buy today won't really be 100% helpful a few months down the road. And the online resources are free.


I don't know about that. C++ syntax has been roughly the same for quite a while now (15+ years) and, what's that saying? "The medal always has a reverse"? Or something? Meaning that online resources, while more up-to-date, can be far more misleading than a book by a respected author. For instance, this one guy on some forum told his audience that "divide and conquer" meant split your code into as many modules as you can.
#13
Quote by CoreysMonster
that's not really true, because programming languages stay the same. C++ isn't really oudated (as far as I know), so a book you bought in '99 about c++ programming is still usable today, because it's still the same language.
But yeah, the internet is better cause it's free

Well, I don't do much programming, but I do a lot of networking and other computer related things, and those books tend to go out of date quickly. My apologies.

Internet is still free.

It was the only task I would undertake...

I P R O G
...to reap the harvest that was mine


- [ P R O G - H E A D ? ] -
#14
I am learning C++ too, are you in my class?
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#15
Quote by MetalGS3SE
Well, I don't do much programming, but I do a lot of networking and other computer related things, and those books tend to go out of date quickly. My apologies.

Internet is still free.

ah okay, those things I have no experience with
But I can imagine how quickly they change, due to their being hardware related.

long live the internet!
#16
Thinking in C++ volumes 1 and 2 are free online, considered cream of the crop intro guides, because they are comprehensive, well organized and the exposition is clear. I want to advise you not to take C++ seriously past getting a decent grade. It's a flawed language with too many half-baked features (some of which no compiler can practically support) and what seems like more exceptions to rules than rules themselves. Just look up guru of the week and C++ faq lite on google to get a glimpse of what trainwreck you're getting yourself into.
#18
Quote by KingStill
Thinking in C++ volumes 1 and 2 are free online, considered cream of the crop intro guides, because they are comprehensive, well organized and the exposition is clear. I want to advise you not to take C++ seriously past getting a decent grade. It's a flawed language with too many half-baked features (some of which no compiler can practically support) and what seems like more exceptions to rules than rules themselves. Just look up guru of the week and C++ faq lite on google to get a glimpse of what trainwreck you're getting yourself into.



Yeah, I'm only taking this class because the college wants us to have programming experience before taking the MATLAB classes, so I'm just here for the grade.

BTW, thanks for the help everyone.