#1
Alright, I'm having an idiot moment here and could use your help...

I have a Peavey Classic 30. It works perfectly normal on the clean channel, but when you hit the button to switch to the overdrive channel it does nothing...the channel does engage, but it there is no gain.

So, I took it down to the local shop to have it looked at. They plugged it in, I plugged in my guitar, and it worked 100% perfectly, like brand new! I felt like a fool, and brought it home thinking maybe something jiggled in the car, idk...

When I got it home and plugged it in, I had the same exact problem as before...no gain on the overdrive channel - all knobs to 12! Tried it in a couple different rooms of the house with no luck.

Any ideas what is going on here?!? Advice, input? I haven't a clue and I hate to bring it back to the store again, just to have it work fine there...
#2
Strange. Does the problem occur when using the footswitch as well as the front panel switch?
MARSHALL JVM 210H
PEAVEY JSX
KRANK 412
MESA 412
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DIMARZIO
CELESTION
#3
I don't have the footswitch. Never had it.
It doesn't make any logical sense to me....could it be the cable? the cable and the electric outlet are the only factors that were different...although the cable works fine with the clean channel and also works with my other amp
#4
make sure your guitar is grounded properly
something like this happened to me before and it was a simple grounding problem on the guitar..
#5
Quote by metalheadblues
make sure your guitar is grounded properly
something like this happened to me before and it was a simple grounding problem on the guitar..


Agreed. That was my next question: have you tried other guitars on it. Or other cables? Try to take everything out of the equation that you can to isolate the problem...i.e. don't use any pedals, try different cables, different guitars, etc.
#6
Quote by metalheadblues
make sure your guitar is grounded properly
something like this happened to me before and it was a simple grounding problem on the guitar..


I'll double check that, but it worked in the store with my guitar (not the stores guitar) that I brought in, and I've plugged in my other 3 guitars with no change.
#8
The cable works fine in my other amp, and works fine for the clean channel...is it possible that it could not do the gain? That doesn't make sense. Maybe I need another brand of cable?
#9
i had somewhat the same problem some time ago. turned out to be the electric circuit that runs through my house had too much volt on it. normally you should be able to find some adapters to put in between your amp and your power circuit.
not sure it's the cause but it looks a lot like my experience so..
#10
Quote by kyates33
The cable works fine in my other amp, and works fine for the clean channel...is it possible that it could not do the gain? That doesn't make sense. Maybe I need another brand of cable?


You are using instrument cable, correct? If its a speaker cable it could produce these results


if not, I'm stumped
#11
yeah, it's definitely an instrument cable and fairly new (although not a super expensive one).
I wouldn't belive it had worked perfectly in the shop if I hadn't heard it with my own ears. Just doesn't make sense
I should pick up a new cable after work tonight and try it....I don't know what else...I'm really stumped over this.
Last edited by kyates33 at Oct 22, 2009,
#12
Quote by kyates33
yeah, it's definitely an instrument cable and fairly new (although not a super expensive one).
I wouldn't belive it had worked perfectly in the shop if I hadn't heard it with my own ears. Just doesn't make sense
I should pick up a new cable after work tonight and try it....I don't know what else...I'm really stumped over this.


I really have no idea...everything I would've done...you've already done
#13
IIRC, and I may be wrong, Peavey Classic 30's are switched using a JFET switch.
A widely varying voltage or improper grounding could throw that off, so loaded might have the right idea here.

The JFET would need a minimum V- to trip, so it could be that.

Try it at a friend or neighbors house.

Another solution is to make sure your preamp tubes are a-ok.

It appears to be an intermittent problem, so make sure that V1 is snug in it's socket.
Wiggle it.

Just a little bit...


I wanna see you wiggle it! Just a little bit!
#14
Thank you for the input. The tubes are definitely snug. I double checked that. You can hear the volume increase when you crank the post knob. I initially thought it might be just a bad pre amp tube or something, which is why I brought it in to the shop. When they plugged it in and it played perfectly right off, it kind of blew that idea out of the water! lol

I am wondering if it could be the electrical outlets in the house? We just moved in a month ago and have trouble with some of the funky switches in the house.
I have tried it in several rooms upstairs with no luck, I'll have to bring it downstairs and give it a go. I really don't have any friends nearby my house where I could take it, but I'll see what I can do.

I was trying to work by process of elimination, but without much luck...guitars and amp are the same (except the drive home in the car, which shouldn't matter) which leaves only the cable and the wall outlet...I have my doubts that the cable is defective, but I'm thinking I should pick up a new one tonight just in case.
Last edited by kyates33 at Oct 22, 2009,
#15
A line voltage problem is unfortunately going to probably affect the whole house, so moving from outlet to outlet isn't going to help there.

A grounding problem might be just a few different outlets/circuits, though, so it's worth a shot to try different rooms and such.

If all that fails, surely the repair shop would let you bring it back in to try their outlet, no?
School?
Parent's work?

Sucks to have to drive it all around like that, but I highly doubt the cable could have anything to do with it.

Another possibility is that something in the cicuit was on it's way out, and gave one last dying blast at the shop. Same goes for the tube. (V1)
#16
Quote by Rutch
A line voltage problem is unfortunately going to probably affect the whole house, so moving from outlet to outlet isn't going to help there.

A grounding problem might be just a few different outlets/circuits, though, so it's worth a shot to try different rooms and such.

If all that fails, surely the repair shop would let you bring it back in to try their outlet, no?
School?
Parent's work?

Sucks to have to drive it all around like that, but I highly doubt the cable could have anything to do with it.

Another possibility is that something in the cicuit was on it's way out, and gave one last dying blast at the shop. Same goes for the tube. (V1)


Thanks for the input. I appreciate it!
I can definitely try it out again at the repair shop if needed. I just feel like a dummy telling them how it won't work and then they flip the on switch and it's perfect! I think the guy thought I didn't understand how to turn up the gain on the amp

I will see if I can try it at the neighbors house tonight after work with a new cable (i could use a spare anyway) and if it doesn't work...back to the shop. I'm at a loss as to what else to do.
If it is a line voltage problem in the house as you mentioned, is there anyway to fix that, or get around it? I'm sorry...I'm not too familiar with electrical problems.
#17
Quote by loaded_
i had somewhat the same problem some time ago. turned out to be the electric circuit that runs through my house had too much volt on it. normally you should be able to find some adapters to put in between your amp and your power circuit.
not sure it's the cause but it looks a lot like my experience so..



That would make sense. The electric in this house is problematic.
What type of adapter would it be? I have some of those long bar extension cord type things, but that's about it. Any idea what I should look for at the store?
#18
Well, if it turns out to be the house wiring, well, that's up to an electrician.

Re-wiring a house is probably not worth it just to play an amp!

If this is the case, you need an AC line voltage regulator.
I'm not talking about your run of the mill surge protector!
I recommend the Furman AR-1215.
It's not cheap, but it's a VERY good idea to run one of these anyway.

The problem is, if you run your line voltage too low, the amp is going to draw more amps. This creates heat. Your amp's fuse is designed to protect from voltage spikes, but frequently can't help you with excessive heat until something's blown.
#19
Thanks for the input!

OK, I'll admit I just choked a little when I saw the price of that adapter...not that it isn't worth it, but it's nearly twice what I paid for the amp itself.

Stupid question...but, if it is in fact a voltage issue, wouldn't it affect the entire amp working properly and not just the overdrive channel? That doesn't make much sense.

At least I have some more info to try to narrow it down and figure out this problem.
Thank you!
#20
Picked up a new cable this evening and no difference, so that is eliminated. Either it is something to do with the electric in my house?!? or somehow something magically jiggled into place on the way to the shop and then back out at my house.....??? Will have to consider taking it in for a repair, although I have no idea how they will fix it when it works fine there. Frustrating!
#21
I know, line regulators don't come easy, but believe me, that's on the low end of the scale (although, it's still a great unit).

Put it this way, if it IS your house voltage, you're going to run into trouble down the line with ANY amp you use.

And if you gig heavily, it's indispensable. You would not believe the nightmares you're going to run into night after night with different clubs and bars that were wired by (apparently) a drunk 9 year old.

At least, you'll know your amp is safe...

But anyway, yeah, take it back to shop, and bring up the line voltage issue.
They're not going to think you're an idiot, it's a legitimate issue, and shame on them for not thinking of it to begin with.
#22
Have you thought about going to a home improvement or hardware store and buying/renting an electrical outlet tester?

They are less than about $20 and can show if outlets are wired correctly. The better ones can even tell if the voltage is too high or too low.

When you say the electricity is giving you other problems in the house, what kind of problems?

The amplifier has a three-prong plug on it. The round one is safety ground, and the other two are the 120 Volts. IF the house is wired badly, the safety ground may be incorrectly connected. That can cause all kinds of safety issues to you and anyone else.

I was going to suggest that you try to borrow a footswitch for the amp from the music/instrument store you took it to. But the manual says the footswitch to work you need to have the amplifier channel select button in the "lead" position - which is the one that doesn't work. I have not yet received the schematic diagram for your amp from Peavey, so I can't do much more than speculate. But a bad safety ground could cause weird behaviors of all kinds.

If you are experiencing flickering lights in the house, or light bulbs burning very brightly, or the AC outlet tester shows problems on several outlets, I strongly suggest you get an electrician in to check things out.
#23
Quote by dkcol
Have you thought about going to a home improvement or hardware store and buying/renting an electrical outlet tester?

They are less than about $20 and can show if outlets are wired correctly. The better ones can even tell if the voltage is too high or too low.

When you say the electricity is giving you other problems in the house, what kind of problems?

The amplifier has a three-prong plug on it. The round one is safety ground, and the other two are the 120 Volts. IF the house is wired badly, the safety ground may be incorrectly connected. That can cause all kinds of safety issues to you and anyone else.

I was going to suggest that you try to borrow a footswitch for the amp from the music/instrument store you took it to. But the manual says the footswitch to work you need to have the amplifier channel select button in the "lead" position - which is the one that doesn't work. I have not yet received the schematic diagram for your amp from Peavey, so I can't do much more than speculate. But a bad safety ground could cause weird behaviors of all kinds.

If you are experiencing flickering lights in the house, or light bulbs burning very brightly, or the AC outlet tester shows problems on several outlets, I strongly suggest you get an electrician in to check things out.


Thank you for the input!!!

Perhaps I should get an electrical outlet tester.

When I saw we have trouble in the house with the electric, I mean that there are several switches that don't work...a ceiling fan that doesn't always work, gfi outlets in random rooms where the don't belong (like the foyer), things of that nature. No flickering lights or troubles with the other appliances.
We just moved in about a month ago. It's a rental, so hiring an electrician is not an option unless there is a serious problem that the landlord will fix. The house is only about 10 yrs. old, but I believe it was previously a foreclosure and the current owner did a lot of fixing up himself, so who knows what's what as far as electrical here.

When we first moved in, the amp worked fine. I had it plugged in and was playing, switched over to the clean channel, played awhile with it, then went to switch back and there was nothing....very strange.

My neighbors are out of town over the weekend, but I can likely try it out over there when they get back Monday...if that fails, then I'll have to take it back to the shop. I'm really mystified by this. I hate to go pay the shop $50 + to look at it if the problem is at my house.

Maybe I should by an overdrive pedal and forget about it
#24
I even tried plugging it in without the third prong into an old 2 prong extension cord...desperate move! No luck though. If it is in fact my house, how could it just be affecting one channel.
But if it's not my house, than how did it work at the store?

Frustrating!!!
#25
I forgot to ask if when you push the channel button in, does it stay in? It must stay in for the "lead" channel to be selected.

If the button is staying in, then have you tried playing some open strings while pressing the button?

Set the button so it is out -> the clean channel is selected. Then try pushing and holding the button in all the way (but don't force it!). Does the lead channel work then?
#26
I forgot to ask if the feel of the channel button is the same as the boost button. In other words, does the channel button wiggle a lot more than the boost button. If so, then there may be a bad or broken solder joint between the channel switch and the circuit board of the amplifier. Unfotunately you would probably need to have an amplifier service person fix that.