#1
Between january and march, i will be auditioning at 6+ music colleges for guitar performance. At some of these colleges, the auditioners are asked to play any song or piece that they feel shows their strengths as a guitarist, putting their best foot forward in their preferred style, etc, and i am unable to decide between two.

Before I go further i would like to apologize that this thread is not directly related to theory, sightreading, composition, but seeing as how I am going to be judged by individuals who know a hell of alot more than i do about music, and guitar, I felt asking in this thread would give me a much more accurate answer than asking in the PIT, which i know first hand contains alot of people that don't know a thing about guitar.

Anyways....
I chose two songs of a style that shows best what i love to play, and that i can already play all the way through making minimal mistakes, so can i come as close as possible to perfecting them by the audition date. I will link the two videos that i learned each song from.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_YEXMU711y0&feature=related
An acoustic fingerstyle arrangement of Bob Dylans AATW, composed by Walter Lupi

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ddn4MGaS3N4
Drifting by Andy Mckee

*Please listen to both songs* and tell me, If you were a one of the people judging at the auditions, which you would be more impressed with. and please do not just say Drifting just because it has 24 million views on youtube.
#2
id go for the bob dylan one.... that kid was fricking awesome by the way
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#3
Which song we think is going to be cooler is irrelevant you need to look at the programs you are applying for and what kind of music they focus on. A classical school won't even listen to you play if you play those things, most jazz schools wouldn't either.
#4
drifting is a pretty common song, if i was a judge is\d be lookin for someone who thinks outside the box. go for the dylan cover
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#5
they dont want to hear music that's played with minimal mistakes. They see through it and realize that that was your intent, because a person who can't practice a perfect piece is unable to then focus on the musicality of playing. This doesn't mean that the performance is perfect, but your mastery over a song shines through even if there are small mistakes on a song. Personally, I enjoy the Andy McKee tune, but that's probably because I dont think Sungha has good tone/technique. Realize though that both songs are HARD (not to learn, but to make musical. There's a huge difference. I've heard hundreds of performances of this song where things are too choppy because a guitarist fails to acknowledge the logistics of the different voices and how they flow.)
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#6
By "in their preferred style" do they mean that anything from metal to bluegrass is okay, or do they mean within a specified number of genres?

The reason I ask is that many (if not the vast majority) of colleges and universities require you to play classical or jazz for your audition piece. If that's the case, neither of these would get you past the gatekeepers.

Don't get me wrong... they're both cool, and show a definite playing prowess, but if the expectation is your preferred playing style being classical or jazz, you'll be lucky if they even let you open up your case, let alone accept you into the program.

EDIT - Damn! Beaten to it by Code. Nonetheless....

And while I agree that musicality is important in an audition, and again, depending on the college and their expectations, it IS often important to play the pieces practically flawless. That said, they can usually tell the difference between a flub and something that has never been quite right in the first place.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Indeed, almost all colleges of music are either classical, or studio/jazz oriented. although i think it would be naive to think that they close their doors to anyone who plays a piece outside of these styles, i could be wrong, and will do some research on this.

I should also mention, the pre screening DVD that practically all colleges require, mine contains two jazz songs, both with a mix of chord progressions in different grips, and improvisation.
#9
some of the schools i'm auditioning at: columbia college, frost at Miami, UCLA, berklee, depaul, university of southern maine
#10
You're wrong about the colleges closing their doors to anyone not playing what their audition requirements state. If you play either of those pieces at a school that requires either something out of the classical repertoire or a jazz standard you won't be accepted. This is different at Berklee because they expect you to play what ever style you are into and play the best. It could be like this at Columbia College but I'm almost positive the other schools you mentioned won't accept you for not adhering to their audition requirements.
12 fret fury
Last edited by Punk Poser at Oct 23, 2009,
#11
Quote by Themann810
some of the schools i'm auditioning at: columbia college, frost at Miami, UCLA, berklee, depaul, university of southern maine



I'm not sure if you're an entering freshman or not, but I got accepted to Columbia for this upcoming spring, and I didn't have to audition. All it took was my application, transcripts, and a couple letter of recommendations and I was in. I had to audition for Berklee, however, which I obviously failed. The people are nice, but it's very fast paced unless you've been at guitar for a long, long time and are used to going through those kinds of things.
#12
Isn't Berklee pretty tough to get in to ? Apparently the learning curve is pretty steep when the terms start
#13
I can't even imagine a college/university music program that doesn't have an audition as part of the entrance requirement.

That suggests that someone who has never even played an instrument before can walk out with a music degree in a few short years. How much integrity can a program like that have?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
I've read alot of college reviews from current students/alumni saying berklee was extremely easy to get into, and the first year just weeds out all the people that aren't prepared/motivated enough to stay
#16
Quote by axemanchris
I can't even imagine a college/university music program that doesn't have an audition as part of the entrance requirement.

That suggests that someone who has never even played an instrument before can walk out with a music degree in a few short years. How much integrity can a program like that have?

CT



I agree completely and find it rather amusing that Berklee has always claimed to be this prestigious school yet up until 3 years ago they did not even require an audition to attend. Sounds to me like they just want your cash.
Originally posted by arrrgg
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Last edited by Led man32 at Oct 26, 2009,
#17
Not to mention that graduating kills your skillz.

Look at Vai, Trooch, all those dudes dropped out.

GIT is apparently a pack of balls as well, according to most of the alumni I've spoken to. Can't anyone do it right? Good teachers, sensible fees, industry connections to get the students work?
#18
Quote by Freepower
Can't anyone do it right? Good teachers, sensible fees, industry connections to get the students work?
Tell me when you find on

It seems like you can have 2/3 but haven't found a place with 3/3. Sensible fees is the one that knocks out almost all of my college choices.

Anyone know how touring musicians get the gig? To me that and studio recording sounds like the dream job
#19
Before I give you my opinion, can you read music at all? Even if it takes you 10 minutes to find one note, you can read.

If you can, then I would recommend getting a jazz arrangement and play that. Here's what you should do.
Look for any jazz standard (buy The Real Book if you don't have it yet), even if it has a few parts, it doesn't matter. And it doesn't really need to be hard. They don't tell you this, but colleges have preference over people who know their music, rather than an ignorant guitarist who can shred. It's easier to make a guitarist than a musician, and probably you'll have your entire style changed when you get into college, I know cause it happened to me.
Anyways, pick a song. I'd recommend a Bossa Nova (Black Orpheus, Girl From Ipanema, Chega De Saudade). Bossa Novas have a certain way of using chords, and if you can do that they'll see you have good control over your chording. What you should do is try to get ahold of a good guitar pedal with a USB port and record the backing track (chords plus any other part that is not the actual melody) onto your iPod or a CD. So, if the song has 32 bars, record 64, so you can improvise for an entire chorus. Use an aux cable to connect your ipod or cd player to your amp (im assuming you can do that on your amp).

If you can't read, that's ok. Just transcribe the song into guitar pro and you'll get the tabs for it.

If you really wanna shred though, you can do a blues, I find blues improving the easiest, since it's mainly on pentatonic scales, but it's good if you move out of it to show you know your scales.