#1
What do people mean when they talk about building chords,
when i ask people about thoery they talk about first getting down the major/minor scales and building chords


what are they talking about
#2
RTFS, seriously.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#3
I think you mean chord constructions.

For example, Amajor is build from the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the Amajor scale (A, C & E)
#5
Quote by SilverSpurs616
I think you mean chord constructions.

For example, Amajor is build from the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the Amajor scale (A, C & E)

so if you start at a root note and then the 3rd and 5th, then youve got a major chord?
#6
Quote by boobinski
so if you start at a root note and then the 3rd and 5th, then youve got a major chord?

The root, 3rd and 5th notes of a major scale played together form a major triad chord, yes.
#7
Alright chord construction.

Basically you need to know your intervals. If you don't know your intervals go away study those and come back.

The basics are all about stacking major and minor thirds.

So start with a root note. I started with C.

Then stack either a Major third on top of that to get C E
or a minor third to get C E♭

Then stack another major or minor on top of that E or E♭ to give you some kind of G.
The result will be one of four possible triads.
  • Augmented 1 3 ♯5 (Major Third + Major Third) (Root; Major Third; Augmented Fifth) So named for it's Augmented Fifth
  • Major 1 3 5 (Major Third + Minor Third) (Root; Major Third; Perfect Fifth) Named after it's Major Third
  • Minor 1 ♭3 5 (Minor Third + Major Third) (Root; Minor Third; Perfect Fifth) Named after it's minor third
  • Diminished 1 ♭3 ♭5 (Minor Third + Minor Third (Root; Minor Third; Diminished Fifth) Named after it's diminished fifth



So try constructing a bunch of different Augmented Major Minor and Diminished triads form a bunch of different roots and spell them out play them to see how they sound.

Then go one step further and see if you can start constructing seventh chords by stacking yet another major or minor third on each of those triads. Don't go further than the seventh though because once you get past the seventh the rules change ever so slightly.

You should be able to get eight different seventh chords this way but one of them will have something odd about it. See if you can figure out what.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Oct 22, 2009,
#8
Quote by SilverSpurs616
I think you mean chord constructions.

For example, Amajor is build from the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the Amajor scale (A, C & E)

NO that would be the A minor chord you've spelled out there SilverSpurs. The A major chord is A C♯ E
Si