#1
So I have a friend who is crazy good at just writing things that are both lyrically fluid (they could be sung well) and are pretty poetic (thoughtful, original). I try so hard to find my own inspiration to capture that essense of musical fluidity and thoughtful wordiness, but I have a really hard time writing anything that seems worth working on in retrospect.

Can someone here throw me a bone? Give me some tips on what lets you cut through the crap and really draw out the best work you've done.
What are some little things you guys keep in the back of your minds while you're writing lyrics, like line lengths, considering syllables, rhyming (cuz it's awesome for choruses, but how much do you use it).

How can I best think and feel emotionally and write well? (big rhetorical question?)
#2
the easy answer to your question (i say easy...) is that you have to write. a lot. i mean a lot a lot. a lot. never get rid of anything. Salinger did alright off the back of one magnum opus, but the rest of us arent so lucky. to find your flow you have to fill up a lot of pages and unfortunately you have to fill many of them up with rubbish. sad fact, but its true. even so, dont be hard on yourself about it, just keep them and move on and keep writing and something you are happy with will form eventually, and hey, you might even look them up in a few months and find you arent so mortified by how terrible they are. You might also cringe at how bad they are, but you can either look at that as a growing experience or just keep them to yourself and never show anyone
either way though, the quickest way to become a good writer is to write. some would argue that you have to read a lot too, but it sort of depends on what you want from your writing. are you writing to help yourself understand and document your hectic life through indelible articulation that you can fathom? or are you trying to show other people insight into your hectic life, through articulation that they can fathom and enjoy?
sorry thats a bit of a copout, but too many people claim they arent happy with their writing, when in actual fact they only have like, three half assed pieces about generic crap to base their opinions and criticisms on.

reminds me of something i wrote a while ago. *shameless plug alert*

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1149273
--------------------i'm definitely the alphaest male here--------------------
#3
hmm
actually, that didn't seem like a cop out at all to me.
It was probably the best answer that could probably be given, even though I anticipate any others that might reply.
You ARE right, just like playing a guitar, you don't get amazing sounds to come out the first couple months you play, you work at it for years... etc.
A lot of my crap is rubbish... I guess the thing that led me here in frustration is that it feels like my friend doesn't really have to work at it, yet she thinks most of her stuff is crap. I'll admit it's not all genius, but she has so many little one/two liners that are epically good. Kinda "slap yourself in the face, wow, that's an interesting way to look at that" good.
Thanks for your reply, man
#4
If you want automatic fluidity, write ballad stanzas. Get really good at fitting the message of your song into ballad stanzas, and then you'll suddenly be good at make fluid lyrics without using ballad stanzas.

I say dedicate a year or so to that form if you really feel that a lack of fluidity is the problem. It instantly creates the movement and flow of most popular music.
#5
no worries.

Quote by IROn 5L1nKY
it feels like my friend doesn't really have to work at it, yet she thinks most of her stuff is crap.


little parallel with your own life there? sometimes its good to be your own harshest critic. if you know your flaws you can work on them, and its far better to be apprehensive about the quality of a piece before you show anyone, than to write something awful and deludedly think its brilliant and that you are a literary genius.
either way, never ever give up. who knows, maybe in few weeks time something will pop out of your head that makes your friend uberjealous of your masterful use of the english language, and wouldnt that be lovely to experience that level of smugness?
but even so, that would just be icing, if you already enjoy what you've written yourself.
--------------------i'm definitely the alphaest male here--------------------
#6
Quote by FunkasPuck
no worries.


little parallel with your own life there?


Yes, I agree, I guess I'm kind of doing the same thing, but see, she KNOWS when she's written some genius one liner that would be the perfect gut puncher at the end of a verse or something.

But to the other guy above, I will check out ballad stanzas.
I guess I just need to work on writing on the instrument and the english language at the same time, much of my work is separate.
#7
Quote by IROn 5L1nKY
Yes, I agree, I guess I'm kind of doing the same thing, but see, she KNOWS when she's written some genius one liner that would be the perfect gut puncher at the end of a verse or something.

But to the other guy above, I will check out ballad stanzas.
I guess I just need to work on writing on the instrument and the english language at the same time, much of my work is separate.


The same time is so important because then you understand how meaning comes from the combination of music and language, rather than trying to cram one to fit into the other. That's why I specifically suggested that form to you, it's rhythmically parallel to most popular and folk music.
#8
*You can't ask to be inspired.*

Write a song about being uninspired. Or even just a line. Take that line, examine, and write down everything else it makes you think about. I've written songs about four different subjects, but if you connect them all through one line, you can't even tell.

And has been said. Practice, practice, practice!
#9
I consider the things you mentioned; line lengths syllables ect.. but I find, I really write my best work when I'm most intoxicated and just not thinking about it. Whenever I'm sober, I sit there and be overly analytical and just have no natural flow at all.
Also I highly agree with FunkisPunk, I have a Mead binder around me all the time pretty much. If something come to my mind, anything at all; whether it be pages of thoughts on a particular subject or one random line, I write it down. A lot of my writing has nothing to do with singing, or music, just how I feel about all kinds of random shit happening in the world. Later on I'll look back on that and pull out small ideas and rephrase things in a way that fit to a melody I have.
But as I said at fist, the stuff I write when intoxicated, always turns out the best. It's way more dynamic and abstract. When I'm sober my writing seems to be very literal and poppy.