#1
I'm going to replace the speaker on my 45 watt, all-tube Peavey Prowler combo. However, I don't know anything about replacing speakers.
I've read people saying that I should get a speaker with at least the same wattage as the amp. Others say I should get a speaker with way more wattage, say a 100w speaker for my 45w amp. And others say it just doesn't matter as long as the ohms match.
I know that ohms matching is not only important, it's crucial. My problem is with wattage.

Can anyone help me here? Preferably citing a reliable source?
Thanks a lot guys.
#2
for high gain amps it's advised to have a higher wattage speaker, this is because the amp's power is measured on the clean channel and may go higher when the pre and poweramp is overdriven

if you have a speaker with he same wattage then you may get some speaker distortion with the gain & volume cranked but this isn't necessarily bad in moderation but too much sounds like poop
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#3
Quote by justinb904
for high gain amps it's advised to have a higher wattage speaker, this is because the amp's power is measured on the clean channel and may go higher when the pre and poweramp is overdriven

if you have a speaker with he same wattage then you may get some speaker distortion with the gain & volume cranked but this isn't necessarily bad in moderation but too much sounds like poop


+1

A speaker can generally handle 1.5x its rating, although its not advisable. To play it safe you should always get a speaker that can handle at least the output of the amp (45 watt amp should be paired with at least a 45 watt speaker).
#4
Quote by justinb904
for high gain amps it's advised to have a higher wattage speaker, this is because the amp's power is measured on the clean channel and may go higher when the pre and poweramp is overdriven

if you have a speaker with he same wattage then you may get some speaker distortion with the gain & volume cranked but this isn't necessarily bad in moderation but too much sounds like poop


Ok so what I get from this is: don't go too low on speaker power 'cause if the amp is cranked up, it'll probably sound like crap. Plus, you could blow the speaker.

Sounds completely logical.

Now, I've read that if I go to high on speaker power, I run the risk of "clipping" (whatever that is) the signal and damaging the speaker.

So I guess my question is now: what's too high and what's too low?

I saw a YouTube video of the Eminence "Texas Heat" and I fell in love with that speaker. Warehouse's "Veteran 30" looks awesome too. However, the Eminence one comes in 150w only and the WGS one comes in 60w.
Is 150w too high? Is 60w too low?
I know my amp is 45w but since it's a high gain valve amp, I guess that whenever I overdrive it, it could blow a 60w speaker.

Please help me out guys. Is there a rule of thumb for calculating speaker wattage?
I know the guy above this post said 1.5x. The problem is I've also read stuff like go 0.9x or go at least 1.7x. Is there a reliable source of information for this claims? Or is it personal experience? (which may be just as valuable)

Thanks a lot but I'm still really confused.
Last edited by NiTrO_FrEeZiNg at Oct 24, 2009,
#6
I think a 60 watt speaker should be fine. My knowledge is that if a valve amp is cranked, the tube breakup can cause extra power going to the speakers. That said, I don't think that it would be equal to 15 watts of power, no matter how high-gain the amp is. Plus, you never really crank both the master and gain IMO. I only ever have my master at 8 o'clock when the gain is full. It just sounds bad. You should try to find out how many watts the stock speaker is. I myself have a 20 watt valve amp through a cab with a 30 watt speaker. I've never had any problems.

If I were you I would-
1. Check what wattage the stock speaker is. Use a multimeter.
2. If for some reason you can't check it, I'd stay between a 45-100 watt speaker. I can't see a 60 watt speaker being to high or to low.

That's my $0.02
I'm not an electrician or anything, so don't take my word as truth, but I am confident that I have my facts right.

If I were you I would also email Peavey, Eminence and Warehouse. You should get the correct response from all of them. They all have good customer service.

Good luck

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#7
agree with earlier posts... to answer new question...

your impedance is going to dictate the power-pull from your amp. going too low on speaker wattage will cause excessive breakup in the speaker, not the good kind like V30's, more like... well, farting noises. no such thing as going too high on handling capabilities (safety-wise), but you won't optimize your tone either. best to keep it close, but as has been previously stated, overshoot it a little to allow for higher preformance on overdriven channels.
#8
Quote by NiTrO_FrEeZiNg

Now, I've read that if I go to high on speaker power, I run the risk of "clipping" (whatever that is) the signal and damaging the speaker.


Clipping is something that occurs in your amp. tube amp overdrive is technically clipping. When solid state amps "clip" you get a very harsh nasty distortion that sounds like total crap. It also is bad for your speakers because it creates "square waves" causing you speakers to move in ways that they were not designed to. Also solid state clipping can put out up to 2x the RMS wattage of the amp...also not usually good for speakers.

Tube amp clipping is often called "soft clipping" because you don't get the harsh tones or the square waves and crazy power spikes.
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#9
Wow. I've been in here for 8 years and I'm still getting helpful replies. Even more that before.

Thank you very much guys. All of you.

By the way, your replies were more helpful than the one I got from Eminence: "Your speaker should be at least 45 watts."

Although it is true, I didn't get a technical explanation like Revelation's.

Again, thanks a lot.
#10
I want to add that I got more replies from Eminence and, even though I've never bought anything from them, their customer service is awesome.
I also got a reply from Peavey. Not very helpful but I can't complain. They've always been great. That's why the only two amps I've ever owned have been Peavey. Well, that and I'm not fucking rich.