#1
Alot of my favorite bands do lots of key and time signature changes, and I've always wondered how its done...DONE WELL I mean.

I'm sure I could go straight from 4/4 C Major to 3/4 F# Minor but I don't know how it would sound. I don't know if my question is making much sense...but thats the best I can explain it haha.
Lots of pedals.
#2
Quote by Skunk Force 9
Alot of my favorite bands do lots of key and time signature changes, and I've always wondered how its done...DONE WELL I mean.

I'm sure I could go straight from 4/4 C Major to 3/4 F# Minor but I don't know how it would sound. I don't know if my question is making much sense...but thats the best I can explain it haha.


Learn how it's "done well" by getting experience with it......... learn songs from your favorite bands. Do this for a while, and allow yourself to develop the skill through experience.
shred is gaudy music
#3
here's an actually pretty decent wikipedia article on modulation (changing key or tonal center)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulation_%28music%29
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Ugh...

When I brought up this page, so much fail dumped out of my computer screen and all over my hands, severely damaging my ability as a musician.
#4
And if you have a grasp on how functionally harmony works, you can alter a chord to be a dominant, sub-dominant etc of the target key

Example (*altered chord)

am, dm, G,C,F,*B*, em ends in e minor

or

at the end of a progression in e minor

em,B,em,*Gb*,Db
Quote by pwninator123
EPIC LOLZ FROM THE LEFTY!!!!!!


Quote by death.prog
Ugh...

When I brought up this page, so much fail dumped out of my computer screen and all over my hands, severely damaging my ability as a musician.
#5
try using chords that go well in both keys in order to get a flowing transition.
#6
Common keys to modulate to are:
-relative minors/majors
-tonic minors/majors
-dominant, sub dominant
-other keys with similar numbers of sharps or flats

Of course you can modulate to any key, but it is easier to make it sound good if you modulate to a key that has some sort of relation to the original key.

A perfect cadence is perfect to end a piece because it feels finished, but it is also a perfect way to change keys because the dominant pulls to the tonic so well. Because of this, using a perfect cadence, chord 5 to chord 1, is a common and quite standard way to change key. For example:

C G Am F (all in C major) x 3
C G Am E7 (dominant which leads to...)
Am F G E7 (new key of A minor)

However, a perfect cadence is only on of many ways to change key and there are many others (eg. an interupted cadence to the relative minor). The best thing to do is to, as Munky said, look at songs which change key well or in a way that sound good to you and work out what chords/cadences/techniques they are using.