#1
Hi guys, somethings been confusing me for a while now. on some tabs (my example being "One" by Metallica) there are notes which seem to slide from nothing.

What i mean by this, is that instead of a linked slide (like 2/3, which is to slide from fret 2 to 3), its simply a slide from nothing (/4, slide to 4, from what seems like nothing). i thought this was, at first because u hold the previous note for a while, then slide. but some, i noticed needed a slide from the same note (eg. /4 then another /4 as the next note). as well as this, some slides were required after palying on a completely different string (eg. play 2,3,4 on E string, but then u need to /4 on the D string).

If anyone understands my problem, and knows anythign about it, feel free to clarify me. thanks
#2
You just start at a random point a few frets below the target note and slide quickly up to it. Normally, you do it slightly before the beat, so that the target note is the one that lands on the beat. And you do it quickly enough so that the note you are actually sliding from doesn't really register, it just sort of merges into the target note.

I hope that makes sense...it's a bit hard to describe without showing you on the guitar.

ps. grace notes work kind of the same way, as do rakes.
#3
You aren't sliding from nowhere pe se. You are coming from a note beneath the one you're sliding to.
Quote by se012101
You just start at a random point a few frets below the target note and slide quickly up to it.

This is partially correct. When sliding "from nowhere" as you put it, generally you slide from the note beneath that in the scale you're playing in (for example, if you're playing in B minor and you are sliding to a B, then you would start from an A natural).

Quote by se012101
ormally, you do it slightly before the beat, so that the target note is the one that lands on the beat. And you do it quickly enough so that the note you are actually sliding from doesn't really register, it just sort of merges into the target note.

Again, this is partially correct. While you do slide quickly, you do not play at all on rests. This can mess with your timing. The note you start the slide on might or might not register, depending on the sound you want.
Last edited by Geldin at Oct 24, 2009,
#4
Quote by Geldin



Again, this is partially correct. While you do slide quickly, you do not play at all on rests. This can mess with your timing. The note you start the slide on might or might not register, depending on the sound you want.


If you wanted the note below to register, you would write it like a normal slide like 2/3, right? I was thinking he was refering more to the quick grace note type slides, especially since he mentioned /4 /4 twice in a row.
#5
A grace note isn't necessarily played on rests or imperceptibly fast. Usually a grace note is played during the same beat as the actual note is and often are optional, "decorative" notes, as my teacher put it. It's all about the sound you want. If a note isn't written (for example, /4), it's at the player's discretion to play how they think it sounds best.