#1
I was about to work on the Gb scale, so to form the chords I wrote down the notes of the scale and I ended up with Gb Ab Bb B C# D# F Gb, as far as I know there's supposed to be one of every note ona a scale but I'm lacking an E and have two B's, so to correct it I should write B as Cb and I would have Gb Ab Bb Cb Db Eb F Gb. So my question is...it's ok to write Cb instead of B or Fb instead of E????
#2
yes that is correct. in a scale, if the tonic is a flat note, then the rest of the notes in the scale must be notated as flat. You don't mix sharps and flats in a scale.
Traynor YCV50 Blue
epi les paul w/ SD Alnico II pros
Dunlop Slash Wah
EH Deluxe Memory Boy
Moen Jimi Vibe
Danelectro Cool Cat Fuzz
Zvex Vexter Fuzz Factory
VHT 2x12 w/ V30's
#3
Yep it's correct to write Cb instead of B in this context. In context it's actually wrong to write B!
Also a note - if two notes have the same pitch (e.g. Cb and B) they are known as enharmonic.
#4
Easiest way to work out Gb is to start with the G scale then flatten every note.

G A B C D E F# G

=>

Gb Ab Bb Cb Db Eb F Gb
#5
Thanks for the answers, I have another question. I know that the chords of any major key are I, IV and V (major chords) ii, iii and vi (minor chords) and the chord formed from the seventh it's a diminished chord, but how do you write it??? viidim, VIIdim...??? sorry if it's a simple question but I'm just learning about theory
#6
Quote by psychokiller99
yes that is correct. in a scale, if the tonic is a flat note, then the rest of the notes in the scale must be notated as flat. You don't mix sharps and flats in a scale.


You don't in key signatures. Its fine (actually it would be wrong not to) to write, say, G harmonic minor as G A B♭ C D E♭ F♯.


TS. Writting Cb as a note enharmonic to B is fine, and in some contexts (such as this one) preferable.

Quote by Niiko_Xeneize
Thanks for the answers, I have another question. I know that the chords of any major key are I, IV and V (major chords) ii, iii and vi (minor chords) and the chord formed from the seventh it's a diminished chord, but how do you write it??? viidim, VIIdim...??? sorry if it's a simple question but I'm just learning about theory


You write it vii°

The lowercase numeral indicates a minor third. The diminished symbol (circle) means the diminished fifth as well. Like wise an augmented chord(♭III+) has uppercase roman numerals, and then a + to represent the augmented fifth.
Last edited by isaac_bandits at Oct 24, 2009,
#7
wrong! its actually a half-diminished chord which is written as a little circle with a line through it, the circle represents full diminished (with the bb7) so (diatonically speaking) that symbol is wrong
Originally Posted by jmac72187
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis 2
wrong! its actually a half-diminished chord which is written as a little circle with a line through it, the circle represents full diminished (with the bb7) so (diatonically speaking) that symbol is wrong


Not entirely correct. In most cases the little circle (what's the typographic name actually?) represents diminished 7th, but it also can represent the dim triad.
#9
Quote by Archeo Avis 2
wrong! its actually a half-diminished chord which is written as a little circle with a line through it, the circle represents full diminished (with the bb7) so (diatonically speaking) that symbol is wrong


There are two common ways of naming diminished chords:

The first uses ° for a diminished triad (1, ♭3, ♭5) °7 for a diminished seventh (C, E♭, G♭, B♭♭.

The other uses m♭5 for a diminished triad and ° for a diminished seventh.

The half diminished seventh is written as ø7 or m7♭5.

There is no such thing as a half-diminished triad and the ø symbol is never used for a triad.

Traditionally triads were °, sevenths °7, and half-diminished sevenths ø7. This method is still the only method used with the roman numerals. With chords, often the diminished seventh would be added when a diminished triad was written (as extensions often are), which lead to the ° coming to represent a diminished seventh. Since they needed an accompanying way to tell the player not to play the seventh, m♭5 was introduced to mean diminished seventh. Some places retained ø7 for a half-diminished seventh, while others adopted the m7♭5 which is a more logical name when used with the m♭5.

Regardless of what system one uses, ø never refers to a triad, and thus you are wrong.