#1
http://www.tonalcentre.org/Harmonicmi.html

"By using it as the harmonic resource for the minor mode one is emphasising its fundamental role in maintaining tonal function."

Can someone explain to me what "harmonic resource" means, especially in the context of "harmonic resource for the minor mode"? I just don't get it.


"In a sense the harmonic minor scale is the 'default' scale to which the melodic variations must return in order for the tonality to be maintained."

Melodic variations? How exactly do they "return", and how is the tonality maintained?


Halp? D:
#2
I was reading through that article.
There are, of course seven modes of the harmonic minor scale just as there are with the diatonic scale, none of them have common names, and it is only the harmonic minor which is tonally effective.

I think I will have to disagree with that. *cough*phrygian dominant
#3
lol, I don't even understand what "tonally effective" really means. I can only assume it has something to do with the scale's notes and their relationship to the tonic?
#4
There's nothing about it in my theory textbook so I'm also lost here.
#6
Just from reading that article, when they say 'harmonic resource', they mean the scale used for harmonic reasons. I've never heard or used the term before, but it makes sense.
#7
"Conventionally when the sixth degree proceeds to the seventh the sixth degree is raised by a chromatic semitone, and when the seventh degree proceeds to the sixth the seventh degree is lowered by a chromatic semitone. Both of these devices transform the augmented second into a major second."

They worded that really odd, I think they're trying to sound smart. You could easily communicate the same idea in one sentence. With simple music terminology.

"In a sense the harmonic minor scale is the 'default' scale to which the melodic variations must return in order for the tonality to be maintained."

As for this, they're trying to explain how a harmonic minor scale can have modes just like the diatonic scale.

"There are, of course seven modes of the harmonic minor scale just as there are with the diatonic scale, none of them have common names, and it is only the harmonic minor which is tonally effective. "

What is trying to be communicated here, is that it's not neccesarily important to remember their names, just which mode is which. They don't really have common names, similar to that of the melodic minor scale. Like i've heard of the 7th mode been referred to as Mixolydian b6, Hyper Locrian, Hyper Mixolydian, and a few others. It's not important to remember the name, but which number it is.
#8
Quote by freakstylez
http://www.tonalcentre.org/Harmonicmi.html

"By using it as the harmonic resource for the minor mode one is emphasising its fundamental role in maintaining tonal function."

Can someone explain to me what "harmonic resource" means, especially in the context of "harmonic resource for the minor mode"? I just don't get it.


"In a sense the harmonic minor scale is the 'default' scale to which the melodic variations must return in order for the tonality to be maintained."

Melodic variations? How exactly do they "return", and how is the tonality maintained?


Halp? D:
I read that article. It's not too bad. Ignore the last paragraph as it's the only one that deals with modes and it really didn't need to go there.

In this article the writer is discussing the natural minor, harmonic minor, and melodic minor scales.

His premise is pretty much that the harmonic minor scale is the fundamental minor scale and the natural minor and melodic minor scales are simply variations on that scale.

The main supporting argument he uses to support this premise is that the harmonic minor scale (with it's leading tone and Major V chord) provide all the tonal strength when in a minor setting.

Using it as a harmonic resource pretty much means using the harmonic minor scale to build harmony - particularly the Major V chord - as opposed to using the natural minor scale.

He mentions the melodic minor as a useful melodic "resource" or tool so that you avoid the awkward augmented second between the minor 6 and major 7 when ascending melodically.

Though what he is saying is kind of right it's not really explained all that well to be honest. And I disagree. I think the harmonic minor and melodic minor are variations of the natural minor scale whereas he is putting the primary importance on the harmonic minor scale.

-At least that's the way I read his article.
Si
#9
Thanks for all the input guys. I don't know enough theory to understand or pick up on the author's opinion (as opposed to "fact", I guess), so your breakdown of what he's trying to say helps.

Like TatarSalad pointed out, it does sound like he's trying to come off as "smart." I like to call it "fluffy" writing.
#10
I call it pretentious writing.

Here's my explanation of natural minor, harmonic minor, and melodic minor if thats what you're after.

Minor Scales
Si
#11
While I didn't understand your explanation word-for-word, the general idea was plain as day compared to the article I linked to.

And yeah, pretentious sounds right. I think I'm the "fluffy" one.