#1
Ok so I just got a Strat and when i got it i had a little fret buzz on the b and e strings I'm not very much of a guitar tech person so I don't know what to do.
#2
adjust the action of those strings
the little screws at the back of the bridge just turn it up or down depending on the fret buzz to get rid of it
#3
They should have provided you with the little allen keys for the adjustment. Raise the bridge saddle by using the little allen key on the two holes on either side of the saddle to raise them, and hopefully remove the buzzing.

Is the buzzing along the length of the string or in certain areas? If it is along the length of the string it is probably due to the action being too low and this should fix it.

edit: when raising make sure you raise each side by even amounts so the saddle is not lopsided.
#4
not on the back of the bride that is intonation on the saddles there are small screws on each side tighten to raise them and loosen to lower
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Quote by Punkismygod
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#5
Ok but if you adjust the screws all the way but there's still fret buzz on like the 1st and 2nd fret of the string what do you do.
#6
Quote by steveo3
Ok but if you adjust the screws all the way but there's still fret buzz on like the 1st and 2nd fret of the string what do you do.

maybe try a different gauge of strings?something lighter maybe
i dunno much about that myself but its an option
#7
Quote by steveo3
Ok but if you adjust the screws all the way but there's still fret buzz on like the 1st and 2nd fret of the string what do you do.


Okay see this is where opinions vary. If you can't here it played through an amplifier I would personally leave it, other people would prefer to fix the problem which usually involves getting a new nut (not an expensive option). But yeah can you hear the fret buzz through the amp? If you can't then it's okay to leave it but if you still want the problem fixed with a simple temporary job then get a piece of paper and make it small enough to fit into the nut and insert it between the string and nut, this should solve your problem if it doesn't your paper wasn't thick enough.

Quote by metalheadblues
adjust the action of those strings
the little screws at the back of the bridge just turn it up or down depending on the fret buzz to get rid of it


No offence mate but if you have no idea what you're talking about then please don't contribute at all as all you're doing is confusing the ts.
#8
if it's a brand new strat the place where you bought it should fix it for you.
I've been imitated so well I've heard people copy my mistakes.
- Jimi Hendrix
#9
Quote by dr_john
if it's a brand new strat the place where you bought it should fix it for you.


Exactly--take it back!
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#10
hahaha aznguitarist I think his heart was in the right place, even though he described the way to change intonation, adjusting the action can help fret buzz.
#11
there are two basic concepts. it may need a truss rod tweak to give you a bit more relief (if your neck has even a bit of back bow, you'll get buzz, remember the treble side of the neck may have less relief than the bass side, but if the guitar is setup correctly it will accomodate this. As was said above, try adjusting the saddle height, if that doesnt help, sight the neck, aim for minimal relief. It may be that you have a slightly higher fret if all of the above has been done, easy fix for a guitar tech, if that is the case, either swop it for another one (if its new) or get the frets looked at. But i really do think that a truss adjustment and saddle adjustment should fix it.
#12
Quote by guidothepimmp
there are two basic concepts. it may need a truss rod tweak to give you a bit more relief (if your neck has even a bit of back bow, you'll get buzz, remember the treble side of the neck may have less relief than the bass side, but if the guitar is setup correctly it will accomodate this. As was said above, try adjusting the saddle height, if that doesnt help, sight the neck, aim for minimal relief. It may be that you have a slightly higher fret if all of the above has been done, easy fix for a guitar tech, if that is the case, either swop it for another one (if its new) or get the frets looked at. But i really do think that a truss adjustment and saddle adjustment should fix it.

This is correct. I'd adjust the neck first and then the action, that will fix any buzz up pronto. Learn how to adjust the truss rod correctly though, take it nice and slow.
#14
Quote by dr_john
if it's a brand new strat the place where you bought it should fix it for you.



Not exactly. New guitars are sold with the expectation that YOU WILL need to have the guitar set up. No 2 players like their guitar set up the same way. There is a generic factory set up but anything beyond that is on your dime.
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#15
Quote by azn_guitarist25
Okay see this is where opinions vary. If you can't here it played through an amplifier I would personally leave it, other people would prefer to fix the problem which usually involves getting a new nut (not an expensive option). But yeah can you hear the fret buzz through the amp? If you can't then it's okay to leave it but if you still want the problem fixed with a simple temporary job then get a piece of paper and make it small enough to fit into the nut and insert it between the string and nut, this should solve your problem if it doesn't your paper wasn't thick enough.


No offence mate but if you have no idea what you're talking about then please don't contribute at all as all you're doing is confusing the ts.

haha yeah its fine
its works like that on my strat but i dunno much just trying to help