#1
All the guitars I've owned had a pretty thin neck, my cousin left his epi les paul on my house and I tried it, it had a super thick neck and sky high action, my surprise was that I could play much better on his guitar
Im now considering getting a guitar with a thick neck, but I want to know why most people say that it is better a thin neck, would it be bad for my hands getting a thick neck? tendonitis and stuff...
Also what guitar with that neck would you recommend?
I play rock and metal with a 1000 dollars budget, i was set on getting an rr5 but now I'm looking for more suggestions. I don't want an epiphone because I didn't liked the sound of it.
#4
If it doesn't fit your hands, then it's the whole neck is a 'con'.
If you does fit your hands, there are no cons.

EDIT: Major typos. XD
Last edited by Baby Joel at Oct 25, 2009,
#5
I see no cons of a thick neck unless if you have midget hands.

^ true, but in that case you would just play an Ibanez Mikro.

for an extra $6000 you can afford an Ibanez Fireman, 26 milimetres of creamy neck goodness.
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Last edited by Al4Project at Oct 25, 2009,
#7
Quote by Ponyexpress
thin necks guitars have the strings much closer together
thick necks are good but slower


I think you mix something up here. You probably mean wide necks, not thick ones.
#8
Personal preference.

Some people prefer thick necks, other people hate them.
But it also depends on your hands.
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#9
Quote by Ponyexpress
thin necks guitars have the strings much closer together
thick necks are good but slower


Im not sure how a thick neck is slower. Necks aren't slow or fast, the player is whats fast. Shawn Lane has played on both thin necks and thick necks, and he still played at the same speed. It's all about the player.

Quote by Baby Joel
If it doesn't fit your hands, then it's the whole neck is a 'con'.
If you does fit your hands, there are no cons.


Pretty much this. I love thick necks.
#10
well the only con of a thick neck is it MIGHT slow you down a LITTLE bit but otherwise its an all around better choice, better tone, fits your hands better, smoother feel generally. and if anything you will be able to play longer with a thick neck and your hand won't tire as quickly. And really there is such a wide variety of guitars you could buy for $1000 or less, but in my opinion if you really want the hands down best guitar you could but for under $1000 go here

carvinguitars.com

you can buy some of their guitars all stock for like $800. they are cheap because you buy direct from the factory so there is no 'middle man' or retailer to deal with. So they can price a guitar you would pay $2000-$4000 at a store for really cheap. I can gaurentee an unbelievable guitar if you do but again, its just my opinion.
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#11
Thin necks are generally for fast playing, like on ibanez's and other guitars.
Thicker necks are generally made for slower playing, like blues or some rhythm playing etc. Like on a Les Paul standard.
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#12
I don't really like thick necks as much, I have small hands. My LP Custom is fine, though.
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#13
Thin necks feel like there's nothing there for me. I like that a lot because there's nothing slowing you down. Most of the time when I slide my hand around the neck, I'm not actually touching the back of the neck on my Ibanez. But I do on other guitars simply because the necks are a lot thicker and get in the way. That added friction really slows me down.
#15
Cons, um, well if it's too thick you wouldn't be able to fret all the strings.
Otherwise, none.

I prefer somewhere in the middle between thick and thin (Schecter necks, ESP "thin U" necks, and the like).
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#16
the best neck ist he one that fits your hands.

I would not consider Epiphones to have thick necks, everyone that I've played has had a thin to medium sized neck. But it depends on what you're used to, if you've been playing Ibanez necks or something, then it might seem kind of thick. A REALLY thick neck would be like ones on the Gibson R8 or R7s. Those are like baseball bats.
Last edited by al112987 at Oct 25, 2009,
#17
Quote by al112987
the best neck ist he one that fits your hands.

I would not consider Epiphones to have thick necks, everyone that I've played has had a thin to medium sized neck. But it depends on what you're used to, if you've been playing Ibanez necks or something, then it might seem kind of thick. A REALLY thick neck would be like ones on the Gibson R8 or R7s. Those are like baseball bats.

They are, man, they are. Especially the R7's.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#18
Quote by FallsDownStairs
Im not sure how a thick neck is slower. Necks aren't slow or fast, the player is whats fast. Shawn Lane has played on both thin necks and thick necks, and he still played at the same speed. It's all about the player.


Pretty much this. I love thick necks.

correct some people like more support for their hands when they play especially if they have bigger hands. I happen to have midget hands with short fat clown fingers even tho im a skinny guy. and lol this coming from a guy with an ej strat.
#19
People concentrate too much on the thickness which is the distance from the fretboard thru the neck to the neck's back curve. Believe it or not we're only talking milimeters here in most cases so the thickness isn't the biggest factor in how a neck feels. It's the profile which is the basic shape of the neck which really makes the difference IMO.
Moving on.....
#20
If it's comfortable to you and you can play well on it then there's no cons. It really is just personal preference. Thin necks just give me hand cramps.
#22
Dean Razorback... lol. I havnt played one (its something about its hideous shape that really turns me off from it...) but my brother did and he said it has a neck like a boat hull... whether this is true or not I'm not really sure..

I like chunky necks though my homemade wolfgang has a nice thick neck, but I have larger hands... One of my friends with smaller hands played it and wondered how I could play it.
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#23
It's just personal preference. There is some debate about how the extra wood in a thicker neck affects tone (usually considered a better thing).

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#24
Quote by Al4Project
^ true, but in that case you would just play an Ibanez Mikro.

for an extra $6000 you can afford an Ibanez Fireman, 26 milimetres of creamy neck goodness.


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#25
People say that a thicker neck slows you down, but that's not true. It's just preference. Like stated, the profile (shape) of the neck has a lot more to do with playing speed than anything else. Sometimes I feel like playing on a Fender C and sometimes on an Ibanez D. It's just preference.
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#26
Quote by Ponyexpress
thin necks guitars have the strings much closer together
thick necks are good but slower


Not true. Thin neck guitars have wider necks to make up for the lack of wood in the thickness. Wider necks mean that the spring spacing will be farther apart. And thick neck guitars aren't slower. I play much faster on my thick necked Gibson then my thin neck Ibanez. (Which I am currently selling because of the neck.)

It's all preference, some people prefer thin necks, some thick.

Quote by Don't Panic Ok?
It's just personal preference. There is some debate about how the extra wood in a thicker neck affects tone (usually considered a better thing).


There's not that much extra wood(if any). It's like if you flatten some dough, there still the same amount of dough there, it's just been made thinner, and wider.
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Last edited by biga29 at Oct 25, 2009,
#27
The cons of a thick neck is if it's too big for your hands, it will hinder your playing. The advantages of thicker necks are longer sustain, fuller tone, better stability through climate change and more support and comfort for your hand.
Conversely, a slim neck may not hinder you as much if you have smaller hands, but obviously it ends up having the counterpoint cons of the thick neck's advantages; less sustain, thinner tone, less stable and durable and if your hands aren't that small then you may find a slim neck will cause you extreme discomfort (as I repeat many times on here, I do have one friend who has literally crippling RSI in his left hand because he forced himself to play a slim-necked guitar "'cause it's faster" when his hands needed something thicker).


The most important thing obviously is your health, so your priority for guitar necks should be finding the one that is most comfortable for you. Not the one that gives you the best tone, not the one that lets you play slightly faster; those are all secondary priorities. You should look for a neck that is as thick as possible without actually slowing you down. Many people don't need 'wizard' style necks, they could play just as fast on a regular Fender neck - other people with smaller hands might actually need the slimmer wizard profile. Other people with bigger hands can play just as fast on a 50's Gibson neck.
I suggest you start off trying Fender Telecaster necks as they are quite average, then if you are able to play at your full ability on that, move up to an older Strat neck to see if you can still play as well. If you're still okay witht hat, move up to a slimmer Gibson neck, then a thicker Gibson neck, and so on. Keep trying thicker and thicker necks until you hit the point where the size starts to stop you from playing to your full ability; you then know you need to go one size below that.
Alternatively if you find the Fender neck is too thick for you, move to a Schecter neck, then an Ibanez neck, etc etc. Keep going slimmer until you find the neck which doesn't hinder your playing.

Once you've found what sort of size and contour you need to fit your hand the best, then you can start worrying about the tone and stability of it. Look for guitars with the same neck but made of different woods, or use a pickup change to tweak the fine details of the tone.

I would suggest if you can't find the 'perfect' neck that offers absolute comfort and perfect playability, you lean slightly more on the comfort side and go slightly thicker. Playing fast is great, but not if it comes at the cost of perminantly crippling your hand.


Never use a neck just because you've been told that it gives a better tone or it will let you play faster or whatever. Tone can be tweaked easily by other things and no neck will magically make you shred like Vai. Always aim for comfort first, maximum playability second, tone and stability a distant third.
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#28
If you do runs up and down the length of the neck a lot. . . then a slimmer profile can be helpful as it is just a little bit faster, but if you tend to find your position and run up and down the width of the neck... then a fatter profile may work better for you.

Why? When you're really belting out the licks in a single position for an extended period of time... especially if you play like Hendrix with chords and licks at the same time... a fat neck will allow you to use more of the palm of your hand against the back of the neck which tends to make playing less tedius, rather than having to use your thumb all the time to press up against the back of the neck... which may be the case with slimmer necks.

Another considersation, for blues players especially.... it's nice to be able to wrap your thumb around the neck to free up one of your fingers for chordal licks; thus, even though a fat neck is nice for blues... it's still nice to be able to wrap your thumb around also. Of course, all this depends on how big your hands are too.

Beyond all that... it's all just a matter of opinion and preference.
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Last edited by Jammy Pige at Oct 25, 2009,
#29
Quote by oneblackened
Cons, um, well if it's too thick you wouldn't be able to fret all the strings.

What?
#30
The only con about thick necks are that they don't make enough guitars that have them!
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#31
Quote by Eater of ashes
What?

Think about it - if your hand is too small for the neck, it won't be able to reach all the way around the neck, therefore making you unable to play the notes on the low E/low B/low F# (6, 7, and 8 string guitars, respectively).
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#32
Quote by PussyPunk182
Thicker necks are generally made for slower playing, like blues or some rhythm playing etc. Like on a Les Paul standard.

wrong. thick necks are used as any other neck. It is personal preference. I have both a LP with a nice thick neck which I love and an older PRS with a super thin neck which I hate. I play better when I have something to grasp and dig into.
#33
It's all preference. I honestly like the Ibanez GRG style necks a little more then the fender necks and the slimmer Wizard profile Ibanez necks. it's the perfect thickness and width for me. and then some people absolutely hate them, and like the thicker fender and gibson necks. It's all preference.
#34
when i bought my mockingbird special, one of the things they said in the writeup was "an extra chunky neck for that 'special' feel"....never knew what that meant, but its pretty nice to play. i'm pretty comfortable with it.
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#35
The fretboard radius and width will usually have more impact on speed. Neck thickness is all about comfort and health.

Quote by oneblackened
Think about it - if your hand is too small for the neck, it won't be able to reach all the way around the neck, therefore making you unable to play the notes on the low E/low B/low F# (6, 7, and 8 string guitars, respectively).


Thought about it and picked up several guitars. This just doesn't make sense. Pick up your guitar and play a open G chord and a barre chord. As you are playing the chords lift your thumb off the back of the neck. How far can you lift your thumb without changing you chord position? The difference between a thin and thick neck is only a few millimeters.
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