#1
Ok i was with a freind and he told me i do it wrong, would anyone be kind enough to explain or link me to a site? and i just hope its not a really big long process to find the key :/
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#2
there's no real technique, you just need to find what scale the song fits into. also, if its like a chord progression, you simply find which chord is the one that the progression resolves onto
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#3
If you're playing rock/metal/pop... like modern western music like that 99% of the time it's the first chord or note in the song
failing that, just play all 12 notes until you find the one that fits the best
#4
Find the tonal center, the point of resolution. If its a piece in A melodic Minor (A,B,C,D,E,F#,G#,A) You would use the key signature of A minor because A is the 1,I, the point of resolution, tonal center, etc. Don't pick a key signature based on which one fits the sharps and flats best. If a lick is in B mixolydian, and B is cleary the tonal center, use the key of B major, even though one has a b7 and one has a maj 7.
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#5
Most of the replies here are correct really.
I usually just try and find the chord/note the piece resolves around and then see if minor or major fits.
I know there are also certain modes to use as well but if you haven't learnt modes then it's useful to feel your way round into what key a solo is in.
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#6
Quote by MLilienthal
If you're playing rock/metal/pop... like modern western music like that 99% of the time it's the first chord or note in the song
failing that, just play all 12 notes until you find the one that fits the best

Wrong. It's usually the last note/chord of the song that will tell you the key. It will usually reside to it's tonal center. For instance, you don't want a song in C to end on an A. It will sound unfinished. It doesn't matter what note it starts on. You can start out of key if you want as long as you don't linger on that note and get back in key soon.
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Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#7
Usually its the root note. For example, A chord progression of A, C, G, D will be in the key of A.

(its usually the first note)
#8
Quote by Junior#1
Wrong. It's usually the last note/chord of the song that will tell you the key. It will usually reside to it's tonal center. For instance, you don't want a song in C to end on an A. It will sound unfinished.


Well i disagree, because unfinished cadences are extremely useful.
#9
Quote by ChangeMyName
Well i disagree, because unfinished cadences are extremely useful.

Yes they can be useful and they can sound good, but that's usually in genres like progressive metal where the key often changes during a song. But to each his own I guess. I've just found looking at the last note to be more reliable than the first. It's still not perfect, but It works.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.