#1
I mostly play basic chord progressions and leave the lead parts to more acomplished musicians. So I guess that means I play "rhythm guitar". Usually, I'm on an acoustic, but have been looking at buying an electric or a hollow body. So what makes a guitar good for rhyth playing? What characteristics should I be looking at?
#2
good rythm guitars are les pauls, stratocasters and es-335's
Last edited by britishsligean at Oct 26, 2009,
#4
Thicker necks are usually better, just for some reason, like you won't have to dance around the fretboard and it doesn't really tire your hand out. Other than that, it doesn't really matter (hell, you might even prefer thinner necks, personally I prefer humbuckers over single coils for rhythm, but it's all preference.

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Last edited by Lil Macker at Oct 26, 2009,
#5
hollowbodies are good, but I use a strat, pretty well anything works
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#6
Use whatever sounds good to you.
Quote by Heylo12
hollowbodies are good, but I use a strat, pretty well anything works

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#7
there is no difference in whether a guitar is good for rhythm or lead, certain guitars compliment each other tonally in a band situation though, tele`s and LP`s sound good together, but a strat and a tele don`t cos there`s is not enough tonal contrast.
#10
Last I checked there was no difference from a "lead" guitar and a "rhythm" guitar.
Last edited by darkcheef at Oct 26, 2009,
#11
I dont understand why people divide guitars into "rhythm" and "lead" guitars. A guitar is a guitar, you can play lead and rhythm on any gutiar you want. So i think a good "rhythm" guitar is the one that fits best into your hand, and sounds good. If in your case that happens to be, for example, a JEM, then go for that, dont obses over the fact that its not a "rhythm" guitar.
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Last edited by gorkyporky at Oct 26, 2009,
#12
It depends on what you need tonally as well. If you're using a lot of gain you ought to try a humbucker-driven sort of thing like a Les Paul or an Ibanez perhaps.

If you don't use too much gain or like to keep it clean you can always resort to the tried and tested Stratocaster with singlecoils. As far as pickups go there are several variations and configurations you might want to have a look at.

But I can, however, give you a little tip as far as sound. You'll be wanting to use the neck pickup, or roll the tone back as it gives you a thicker sound that's out of the way for lead guitarists, who tend to wail and use a lot of treble. As a rhythm guitarist you want to blend in more with the bass to form the foundation in the band.

Hollowbodies can give you feedback if you use a lot of distortion and gain but work excellently when the amount of gain is moderate or when playing clean. If you want a budget hollowbody I suggest you take a look at some Epiphone ES 335 versions or even other ES guitars.

If you give us more information regarding budget and other things you deem important I am sure we will be more helpful.
#13
Quote by britishsligean
good rythm guitars are les pauls, stratocasters and es-335's

you fail
You need to open your eyes to guitars which don't say Gibson or Fender on the headstock.

Although there is no such thing as a "Rhythm Guitar', I like something with a comfortable feel, versatile pup options, Humbuckers or P-90s to increase clarity on some muddy chords (due to the hum on singlecoils they can be annoying + the tone is thinner) and I like a nice thick, chunky neck. I also use a slightly thicker pick for rhythm playing. My PRS is an ideal Rhythm guitar for me, BUT it does lead equally well!
#14
A good rhythm guitar is a good lead guitar. Guitars aren't specifically lead or rhythm, and while some feel more like lead guitars and some feel like chunky rhythmy guitars, so to speak, one can do both. Personally I love the Casino for both of these, albeit it has one of the nicest rhythm sounds I've ever heard and not much sustain due to being fully hollow, so it is one of my favorite guitars for rhythm, and is one of the few I feel fits into one better than the other.
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#15
It really is personal choice. That said, my personal choice is something with a thicker neck for comfort and tonal depth. Unless you play high gain stuff low or medium output pickups are best, look for pickups that are well balanced. Thats all I got fer ya.
#16
Quote by Delboyuk_01
Good rhythm guitarist's..?


Yes this all a rhythm guitar would ever need to be a good rhythm guitar.
#17
Short scale guitars are better for rhythm, and longer scale for lead. Carvin and PRS guitars can do both equally well. IMO
Last edited by stratman7 at Oct 26, 2009,
#18
Make sure that when you play a chord the pickups don't start churning out mud. Be able to hear every chord well defined, without the muddiness. That's pretty much it for rhythm, everything else depends on the tone you want.
#20
The only things I'd say you need to look for more in a guitar if you mostly play rhythm are balance/versatility and comfort. If you're a rhythm player, you probably won't have much use for a Floyd Rose and an active mid boost switch - not that these are bad things for a guitar to have, just that if you're playing rhythm you'll probably never use them so you might as well not bother having them there. Also, because of the nature of most rhythm playing, you may find it beneficial to get a guitar with a thicker C neck or a vintage soft-V shape neck as these will fill in your hand more which can be more comfortable when playing typical rhythm parts for a long time.

That's it though, there's no particular body styles, brands, woods, pickups or hardware that is more suitable for rhythm playing than lead playing.
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#22
Bass...?
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#24
Quote by britishsligean
good rythm guitars are les pauls, stratocasters and es-335's


you sir fail

i wish people would stop saying les pauls are not lead guitars when so many amazing lead players have used them
#25
I appreciate that there is no such thing as a rhythm guitar, but surely there are definitely attributes that make some guitars more popular for rhythm. Maybe it's just my imagination, but it seems like hollow bodies are pretty popular for rhythm, though I'm not really sure why.

I've been thinking of picking up an Ibanez artcore, or something in a similar vein (and price range). Any suggestions?
#26
Quote by Tyberious Funk
I appreciate that there is no such thing as a rhythm guitar, but surely there are definitely attributes that make some guitars more popular for rhythm. Maybe it's just my imagination, but it seems like hollow bodies are pretty popular for rhythm, though I'm not really sure why.

I've been thinking of picking up an Ibanez artcore, or something in a similar vein (and price range). Any suggestions?



well generaly and ive saying VERY loosly here but the 24.75 scales are rhythm. Also they rarely have tremelos
#27
I use my ibanez rg370dx with a FR, wizard II neck; and i play rhythm guitar in my band and its great, so yeah...

Originally Posted by Delboyuk_01
Good rhythm guitarist's..?
#28
Quote by Tedis1111
you sir fail

i wish people would stop saying les pauls are not lead guitars when so many amazing lead players have used them


He never said Les Pauls are bad lead guitars.... He said they're good rhythm guitars.

A Good rhythm guitar is often also a good Lead guitar. Not always the case the other way around.
#29
Quote by Jayman80
He never said Les Pauls are bad lead guitars.... He said they're good rhythm guitars.

A Good rhythm guitar is often also a good Lead guitar. Not always the case the other way around.


come on its pretty odvious he meant that, there is no such thing as a good rhythm guitar becuase what makes a good rhythm guitar? what feels good to teh player
#30
Quote by gorkyporky
I dont understand why people divide guitars into "rhythm" and "lead" guitars. A guitar is a guitar, you can play lead and rhythm on any gutiar you want. So i think a good "rhythm" guitar is the one that fits best into your hand, and sounds good. If in your case that happens to be, for example, a JEM, then go for that, dont obses over the fact that its not a "rhythm" guitar.


I agree with you

PS: Joža je res kul:P
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#31
Quote by Tyberious Funk
I mostly play basic chord progressions and leave the lead parts to more acomplished musicians. So I guess that means I play "rhythm guitar". Usually, I'm on an acoustic, but have been looking at buying an electric or a hollow body. So what makes a guitar good for rhyth playing? What characteristics should I be looking at?

the person who is playing it, hopefully.
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#33
Quote by Tedis1111
well generaly and ive saying VERY loosly here but the 24.75 scales are rhythm. Also they rarely have tremelos

so you just bashed someone unjustly for saying a les paul is a good rhythm guitar (for what reason? he was simply complimenting a les paul, lol) then you say 24.75" scale guitars without trems are for rhythm...

With that said, i actually prefer longer scales for rhythm in a way. i'll use a telecaster as an example here: the longer scale somewhat contributes to the clear note definition meaning you can play some complex chords with a generous amount of distortion and not lose a lot of clarity, but they have a tendency to be quite screechy and thin for lead work (perhaps just for my liking anyway - i know some people love using teles for lead too, and that's alright with me). But if you were to plug a les paul in and play the same complex chords with the same level of distortion it might end up sounding quite muddy and not that nice really. On top of that, it's generally easier to twang the low E out of pitch with hard strumming on a shorter scale, which is why i'd much prefer a longer scale for rhythm really, even though it can be harder to stretch your hands into awkward chord shapes.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#34
Quote by Blompcube
so you just bashed someone unjustly for saying a les paul is a good rhythm guitar (for what reason? he was simply complimenting a les paul, lol) then you say 24.75" scale guitars without trems are for rhythm...

With that said, i actually prefer longer scales for rhythm in a way. i'll use a telecaster as an example here: the longer scale somewhat contributes to the clear note definition meaning you can play some complex chords with a generous amount of distortion and not lose a lot of clarity, but they have a tendency to be quite screechy and thin for lead work (perhaps just for my liking anyway - i know some people love using teles for lead too, and that's alright with me). But if you were to plug a les paul in and play the same complex chords with the same level of distortion it might end up sounding quite muddy and not that nice really. On top of that, it's generally easier to twang the low E out of pitch with hard strumming on a shorter scale, which is why i'd much prefer a longer scale for rhythm really, even though it can be harder to stretch your hands into awkward chord shapes.



like i said i was speakingn very loosly try reading the post.
Trems are not used alot as a rhythm player in songs so thats why i said that and the longer scales is because the strings are tighter so its easier to speed pick