#1
First off i'm sorry if i'm putting this thread in the wrong place. Anyway, me and the other guitarist both have 2 guitars (he's getting his second for christmas), and our band is having a problem with tuning issues. I think that because we both have only 2 guitars we should only use two tunings. That way we don't have to worry about changing tunings, but my band is thinking otherwise. They insist that we use multiple tunings. Which would be ok with me, except the problem with that is that if one song is played in E standard you want to use a thinner gauge of strings, but if you play in Drop A (other guitarist writes in it) then you have to worry about getting strings that are thick enough for the low tunings. If that makes sense. That's the problem is string gauge. Anyway how can I get my band to realize that we should stick to two tunings, because instead the other guitarist writes in Standard, Drop D, Drop B, and Drop A. I like to write in D standard or C#. But i'm ok with any tuning, i just want to stick to two tunings. Any help is apperciated, and sorry for the wall of text.
#2
um.... and standard tunings and drop tunings can be played the same (ie. drop a and drop d, c# standard, e standard) just use E standard and drop D... you dont need to have super low notes to be metal...

GUITARS CURRENTLY USED
Ibanez RG7621
Ibanez RG121
ESP LTD H-400
#3
Quote by SPBY
um.... and standard tunings and drop tunings can be played the same (ie. drop a and drop d, c# standard, e standard) just use E standard and drop D... you dont need to have super low notes to be metal...

Disregard this, he clearly doesnt realize that not everyone sings as an alto or tenor, some of us are low baritones and basses.

My suggestion: have one guitar in E standard (can change to drop D) with normal gauge strings, and another guitar with thick strings down in drop A/ B standard. That's 4 possible tunings to use.
Ibanez Xiphos XPT700
Laney VH100R
Epi Les Paul (SH-1 '59 neck, SH-11 custom custom bridge)
#4
Quote by Ackj
Disregard this, he clearly doesnt realize that not everyone sings as an alto or tenor, some of us are low baritones and basses.

My suggestion: have one guitar in E standard (can change to drop D) with normal gauge strings, and another guitar with thick strings down in drop A/ B standard. That's 4 possible tunings to use.


seeing as they were talking about playing in drop A, i was inferring that there would not be much singing as much as metal growl/scream vocals

PS, you can sing high over low guitars too, as long as its in the same key, it doesn't have to be at the same frequency, soooo.... yeah

GUITARS CURRENTLY USED
Ibanez RG7621
Ibanez RG121
ESP LTD H-400
Last edited by SPBY at Oct 26, 2009,
#5
Quote by SPBY
seeing as they were talking about playing in drop A, i was inferring that there would not be much singing as much as metal growl/scream vocals

PS, you can sing high over low guitars too, as long as its in the same key, it doesn't have to be at the same frequency, soooo.... yeah

He never said anything of the sort, and even if he did, why would your advice be "don't downtune, just play in the same tuning as millions of other bands" ?
Ibanez Xiphos XPT700
Laney VH100R
Epi Les Paul (SH-1 '59 neck, SH-11 custom custom bridge)
#6
Quote by Ackj
He never said anything of the sort, and even if he did, why would your advice be "don't downtune, just play in the same tuning as millions of other bands" ?


because from the context of his post it looked as if he preferred to use E standard over the down tunings of his other guitarist, so i suggested E standard and dropped D instead of drop A so he didn't need big strings and a re-set up

EDIT: he also said that the other guitarist also write in standard and drop d, so cutting out all of the other tunings would make it a lot easier for them

GUITARS CURRENTLY USED
Ibanez RG7621
Ibanez RG121
ESP LTD H-400
Last edited by SPBY at Oct 26, 2009,
#7
guys guys guys... we're getting off track.

OP, are you saying you EACH have two guitars, or two guitars between the two of you? if you have four total guitars, vary the gauges between them so that they're at a comfortable level for you/other guitarist. tunings are relative. by that i mean you can use standard strings to tune standard, drop d, dadgad, etc., and with a heavier gauge you can tune relatively lower, i.e. d-standard, drop c, etc.

that's all pretty basic, and i think you get it, but what i'm saying is that you don't need a ton of different guitars to each have a specific tuning (unless you're uber rich and in a huge band, then why not - slash, mark tremonti, etc.). also, with a little transposition, there's no reason why one guitarist can't be tuned lower than another, and let's not forget the capo... i know, it's a dirty word around here (even though it allows you to play chords your fingers wouldn't otherwise be able to reach unless you have steve vai hands that reach from the nut to the 10th fret, but hey, whatev, let the cork sniffers think they're special).

beyond that, if your band has a problem with their "limited" tuning options (1) they don't know what they're asking/what they're talking about, and (2) you should suggest THEY provide additional instruments.
#8
the best way to do it would be to have one guitar for E standard and Drop D and another guitar for a lower standard tuning and it's corresponding drop tuning, and just stick to those fours tunings, as you get into the lower tunings it won't make much difference as to how low you really are, it'll be low enough. especially with original songs because you can just play your songs that are in different tunings than the selected ones in whatever's closest. it really won't make a lot of difference.

and remember that if you have something in say, d standard, you can easily transpose it to drop d

also, remind them that you shouldn't have to completely retune on stage, it takes way too much time to change from E standard to D standard.

edit: forgot to mention that if you're playing a cover, it won't hurt to play it in a different tuning as long as it's pretty close. for instance, anything in Eb standard can be played in E standard. nobody will know any different. hell, my band plays Bodies by Drowning Pool in drop d
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Oct 27, 2009,
#9
Some people obviously disagree, but I feel that 2 tunings is enough for any band. Considering the limitations you have on equipment, it would be best for your other guitarist to limit himself to writing in fewer different tunings.

Besides, if you write in D Standard and he writes in Drop A, how will you get a cohesive sound together for your band? Every song will sound completely different and the sound of your band won't develop if you keep changing tunings.

The GazettE are a good example of how tunings should work in bands, they use Drop B for heavy songs and D Standard for ballads, and that's enough in my opinion.
#10
There is nothing wrong with variation, so I think its fine if you use multiple tunings for writing. However, you do have to take into consideration the fact that playing shows live usually doesn't grant you the time to make all these tuning changes.

If you each have two guitars, a smart idea would be to have one guitar for E standard/ Drop D, and the other for whatever ungodly low tuning you are using.
This being said, it's fine to write songs in many different tunings; I often experiment with all sorts of tunings.

One thing you may want to consider though is having a set two or three tunings to use for your sets (try and pick the ones most of your songs are written in) and keep the different tuned songs out of your live set, at least until you can afford to own a guitar for every tuning you desire. Good Luck