#1
How exactly do you practice with a metronome?

I've been playing for nearly 3 years and I turn on my metronome and let it click away but have no idea how to practice within the metronomes clicks or whatever.

Example I'm trying to learn a bit of Dream Theaters Lines in the Sand solo which is slightly faster than I'm used to playing and since I'm not that clever at computers all I can do is describe the period in which it plays on the song, which is between 6.09 and 6.15 just before the rake bringing in the wah.
Its not overly hard, I just have no idea how to practice it with a metronome to make me better and faster with it and similar passages I wanna learn in the future.

Anyway my quandary is a large one and would like a bit of hand.

Cheers guys!
Prog flavored juice ... You tried it yet?

Shameless plot to promote zee band.
Shed 31
#2
Try to time your accents with the clicks.
MINI enthusiast

@stevenpollock

My band: avenueofembers.com
Quote by neverspoiled
thank you stevenpollock..
the only Pit-head thats not a douche bag...right now anyway
=)
#3
a metronome works like a drumset... if you practice playing to a metronome, you get better by playing 'in time' .. rather then off beat and sloppy.
#4
You figure out the song's tempo [or check out its Guitar Pro tab] and set the metronome to play at that tempo. And practise away?
Not sure bout the effect of the odd time signature changes.

In my world, the color RED doesn't exist.

The system has encountered a fatal error [1809]: 'YourOpinion' var has no set value.
#5
yeah you just count to the metronome. each click is a quarter note. if it's in seven four time i count; one, two, three, four, one, two, three, one, two, three, four, one, two, three
#6
I love that solo. It's so fun to play. For the part you're talking about, it's sixteenth notes at 120 bpm. So that's 4 notes per click. For counting I find it works best if you sub-divide it like one-ee-and-a, two-ee-and-a (that's bolded for a reason addressed later), etc. For that particular part, it starts on the 4th note of the second beat. So that would be that bolded -a. To use the metronome, just slow it down to a speed that you can play it at and gradually build it up to full speed.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#7
I struggle with this as well. I understand it conceptually, but I don't really know how to sub divide notes from a tab particularly well so I can synch up with a metronome. Therefore I'm relegated to paracticing 12 bar blues or scales to a metronome and being completely clueless when practicing a song or solo to one.
#8
I'd say it's easier to just practice over the song itself rather than a metronome. It'll keep you in time and it's a lot more fun and interesting to hear.
#9
If you know the song but can't play it at the speed of the song, slow down to the metronome. Even if it seems as too much, get it down to 40, and just run through the parts you have trouble with, then when you have everything down, with no mistakes, and the way you should play it, go up a few clicks every time you play it perfectly. So pretty much you're increasing your own speed without noticing (cause 4 extra bpms is pretty much unnoticeable). Do that, and I guarantee you, your speed will go up like crazy.
#10
Thanks for the advice guys I'll be sure to take what you guys tell me and make something of it.
If I get any good at it I'll have to upload it somewhere for you guys to check out.
Prog flavored juice ... You tried it yet?

Shameless plot to promote zee band.
Shed 31