#1
Could you get a good metal sound out of a gibson les paul standard? If you plug it into a metal pedal, will it sound good for metal?
#2
What pickups does the standard have in it? Burstbuckers? 57' Classics? What kind of pedal? What kind of amp? So many questions.
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#3
its got burstbucker pros, and the pedal would be like a EHX metal muff, or a BOSS MT-2, the amp is a lilne 6 spider jam.
#4
I wouldn't get a distortion pedal for that amp, it's a moddelling amp and will sound utter sh!te.
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#5
Yeah it can, with the right amp. So probably not with a line 6 spider.
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#6
i say yes. i use a gibson sg with the standard 490r and 490t that come in it and i play metal thru my line 6 spider III. I mean, in the end you can play anything on any guitar. James Root from slipknot plays a strat, with emgs tho so i guess that doesnt count.
#7
Burstbuckers are high enough output to play metal and the pedals are fine though I'm not a fan of any BOSS distortions. The spider... well it's not well liked around here. I had a first edition spider way back when and those digital amps just sound horrible when you turn them up past practice level. Combine that with a digital boss pedal and bad tones could happen.
Les Paul Traditional '08
Fender American Strat '99
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535 Crybaby-Whammy-Small Clone-DD7 Delay

"I have a very high EQ--something like 3,000 hertz. If I think too hard, my brain hertz." Harrison
#8
Hell yeah, they can. They do it pretty well. If it's the one with Burstbuckers (ie. the current Les Paul Standard) it'll do metal quite well. It has a nice balance of smoothness and clarity.

Older les pauls (before 2005, methinks) had 490 and 498 pickups, which were higher output, but a lot less clear and often muddy. They didn't go well with distortion pedals. The ones they have now are a bit more fogiving in that respect.
#10
i always saw les pauls as a kinda black canvas stick new pups in and it can do anythnig
#11
Are you about to get this guitar?

Seriously, spend some of that $2000-2500 on a decent amp. I don't care what amp it is, provided it's not a beginner-level amp.
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You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#12
Jesus Christ, so much misinformation in this thread already.

There are four ways of getting ''metal'' levels of distortion. A Les Paul standard will work perfectly with three of them and be 99% fine for the fourth.
  • Using a fully cranked high-gain amplifier. This means just plugging directly in to the amp, putting it on the distortion channel and cranking it all the way. With an amp like a Mesa triple rectifier or some of the newer modern Marshalls, you should be able to get a metal tone very easily by just doing this. No need for pedals or for high output pickups (in fact the lower output your pickups are, the better with this method). The main downside is because of the need to have the map fully cranked, this will be impractical for practise use.
  • Using a mid-gain amp and a boost pedal. More commonly known as an overdrive pedal, boost pedals are simply make the output of your guitar much louder, to drive an amp harder. This is useful when you want hard distortion and you like the tone of your amp, but your amp is only capable of classic rock levels of distortion at most. The advantage to this is you can click off the overdrive pedal and be back to a cleaner/light crunch tone, though the downsides are you'll experience a large volume drop when clicking off the pedal and also since this method requires the amp to be fully cranked, unless your amp has a master volume control you will find this completely impractical for home/practise use.
  • Using any amp and a distorton pedal. You do this when your amp will never produce hard enough distortion on it's own and when the tone of your amp's distortion isn't what you want anyway; so you replace the amp distortion entirely by using a distortion pedal. Set the amp to a clean tone, click the distortion on and off as you need it, job done. It is best to have low output pickups with this method as low output pickups work better with pedals. The advantage to this method is there being a wide range of distortion pedals to choose from so you can get exactly the tone you want and you can isntantly shut it off for a perfect clean tone whenever you want. The main downside is distortion pedals will never react to your playing in the same way a crankced all-valve amp will and they can be unresponsive to things like changing the volume on your guitar.
  • Using a high-gain amplifier half cranked and high output pickups to push it further. This is the only time you need high output pickups, the only time. You get a high-gain amp like a triple recti Mesa or ENGL, you crank it to around half way and you get high output pickups to drive it the rest of the way. This is especially good with active pickups or passive pickups matched with an active mid boost circuit, as these active systems provide a lot more output than passive pickups on their own; frankly the difference in output between a 'low' output humbucker and a 'high' output humbucker actually isn't all that much, but the difference between a medium output passive humbucker and a mid output passive humbucker with an active mid boost switch is huge. The advantage of this is you can, using the guitar's controls, roll down the output (volume) very easily to get back to a cleaner tone without having to be in a specific place to step on a pedal or hit a button on the amp. It's even easier with passive pickups and an active mid boost switch as that clicks right on and off directly, like an overdrive pedal. The downside to this method is the clean tone you get when you roll your volume down might not be that great and active systems (both pickups and mid boosts) can sometimes be hard to install in certain guitars and use up batteries. There is no need for any pedals with this method.


So, there you go.

Will a Gibson LP Standard be able to do metal? Yes, very easily, if you use methods #1, #2 or #3. If you want to use method #4 then it depends on the amp, some amps will find the Gibson's stock pickups are high enough output, with other amps you'll need to put in higher output pickups, active pickups or an active mid boost system.
Look up Doug Aldrich for an example of metal tones with a normal Les Paul with low-output passive pickups and a mid-gain Marshall head.



Whichever way you end up going with, absolutely never get active pickups going into an overdrive or distortion pedal going into a solid state amp. Far too many people on here seem to do that sort of thing and not only does it produce a bad tone, it also simply defeats the point of eahc part. No point having active pickups if you have a boost pedal, no point having a boost pedal if you have active pickups, no point having either if your amp is a solid state amp, no point having a distortion pedal if your amp has any modelling technology in it, put them all together and you're doing nothing but throwing your money away.




And in case you can't tell from this, YOU NEED TO BUY A NEW, MUCH BETTER AMP FIRST.
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#13
Jeff Hanneman from Slayer used a Les Paul in the early days... so... hell yeah you can.

Most ESPs guitars are trying to sound like Gibsons anyway!!!
#14
John Schaffer of Iced Earth does it.
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

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#15
Daron Malakian used Burstbuckers in his Iceman's live, so I would say that a LP should do the trick equally well.


Theres countless other musicians that use LPs set up in varrying ways for different varieties of metal.
#16
I've heard a respectable metal tone out of a Gibson LP Doublecut Faded (w/ P-90s) through a Dr. Z Mini-Z. I have no idea what pedals were going into the amp, but still.
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#17
Quote by sashki
Hell yeah, they can. They do it pretty well. If it's the one with Burstbuckers (ie. the current Les Paul Standard) it'll do metal quite well. It has a nice balance of smoothness and clarity.

Older les pauls (before 2005, methinks) had 490 and 498 pickups, which were higher output, but a lot less clear and often muddy. They didn't go well with distortion pedals. The ones they have now are a bit more fogiving in that respect.

mine is a 2004 Standard Special Edition and has the burstbuckers in it.
The LP will easily do metal and do it well.
#18
Quote by AlexAngus
Jeff Hanneman from Slayer used a Les Paul in the early days... so... hell yeah you can.

Most ESPs guitars are trying to sound like Gibsons anyway!!!


#20
Quote by MrFlibble
Jesus Christ, so much misinformation in this thread already.



hey, i know i'm just poking a tiger here, but i've ignored this for months and i'm really curious.

why do you start so many of your posts with such negativity?

i mean, do you realize how angry you come across?

you obviously want to help, because you usually respond with a wall of text.
you couldn't possibly be this pissed off for all these months, and still feel like posting here.



just wondering.

TS, my 2 cents, already been said several times.
yeah it'll play what you want.
just make sure you have a balanced rig.
Jenneh

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#21
Quote by jj1565
hey, i know i'm just poking a tiger here, but i've ignored this for months and i'm really curious.

why do you start so many of your posts with such negativity?

i mean, do you realize how angry you come across?

you obviously want to help, because you usually respond with a wall of text.
you couldn't possibly be this pissed off for all these months, and still feel like posting here.



just wondering.

TS, my 2 cents, already been said several times.
yeah it'll play what you want.
just make sure you have a balanced rig.

Good question. He always comes across as really surly.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#22
What some people don't realize is your playing style really effects how heavy of a sound you get. I've had people plug into my gear using my guitar and it sounded extremely weak, but then when I play it gets a heavy more metal sound to it which I can usually put out on just about anything withh just a good amount of gain.

Alot of LPs actually have high output pickups. I've never had a problem with getting a metal sound out of one.
#23
Quote by oneblackened
Good question. He always comes across as really surly.

He also comes across as one of the most helpful and knowledgeable guys on the forum. He's not always (or even usually) that nice about it, but can you blame him when you see the same misinformation over and over and over no matter how many times he or any of the other more knowledgeable members posts?

There are a lot of really well-informed and experienced guys (and girls) here, but over half of any given thread tends to be responses from people who have no idea what they are talking about who are either repeating incorrect info they heard somewhere else or making stuff up on the spot. Stuff like "that looks cool and looks cool makes you metal sound", "I heard less paul played jazz so if you dont play jazz and you have a less paul you are doin it rong lol", "to play metal you need high-gain pickups, a halfstack and a kickass distortion petel and that is how you sound like steel (the strongest kind of metal)" etc etc...

They mean well, and they want to help, but when people who know a lot about anything that they see as important see other people spreading incorrect information about that topic... they are going to get kind of upset. At least some of the folks on here who get mad attempt to combat the more damaging pieces of misinformation instead of simply ignoring them and letting them spread.

Just my two cents.

...

Anyway yes, an LP Standard can do metal.
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#24
In Flames/Mastodon. Yes.

/thread.

A standard tele with singles can do metal with the right EQ and amp though so really the whole guitar question is irrelevant.
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#25
I play les pauls and my gibson is great for metal. Get a good distortion pedal or amp with some great gain and sure you could, but I prefer my BC Rich Mockingbird for metal. 24 frets is somethign you'd proabbly want. those extra 2 frets make screaming shred guitar so amazing.
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#26
The only thing I want to say about this is: Don't buy a Gibson Les Paul. They're not worth their high price. I own a Gibson, so I should know. I got tired of it in a month, and half a year later I was playing a Strat...
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#27
Quote by jj1565
Question here.

Quote by The_Future_Soon
Answer here.
Pretty much the case.

Also because we go through these same topics three or four times a week and a lot of the answers are already in the stickied threads; then there's the frequent times a thread could be easily answered with a simple Google search. It's like nobody even tries to see if an answer to their problem already exists, they somehow think making a new thread with an obvious question and waiting for people to respond is somehow quicker and better than typing a couple of key words in a search box and clicking the first couple of results.
Also because I find stupid people insulting.
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#28
Quote by The_Future_Soon
He also comes across as one of the most helpful and knowledgeable guys on the forum. He's not always (or even usually) that nice about it, but can you blame him when you see the same misinformation over and over and over no matter how many times he or any of the other more knowledgeable members posts?



i get what you're saying.
but it's important to remember that it's a different kid every time.
different guy, same question.

and yeah a lot of these answers are easy to find,
but it's not like they can use the search function all the time.
because God forbid some kid bumps a year old thread with an Additional
question on that topic,
4 guys will jump down his throat for a necro-bump, instead of answering his question.

hey, believe me, i get pissed all the time too, but the only way i'm able to come back to it, is to stay upbeat.
i just wondered how he could do it when he's so angry while answering.


Quote by MrFlibble
Pretty much the case.

Also because we go through these same topics three or four times a week and a lot of the answers are already in the stickied threads; then there's the frequent times a thread could be easily answered with a simple Google search. It's like nobody even tries to see if an answer to their problem already exists, they somehow think making a new thread with an obvious question and waiting for people to respond is somehow quicker and better than typing a couple of key words in a search box and clicking the first couple of results.



fair enough.

Also because I find stupid people insulting.



ok, whatever floats your boat.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
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