#1
Im trying to figure out how to work out the notes inside chords in my head. i understand the circle of fifths and also know about the triad and minor chords having a flattened 3rd.

I know its something basic but when i try and work out what notes are in an Asharp chord in my head i find it difficult. Do i need to memorise all key signatures?
#2
the way i do it is that i picture a guitar fretboard and the shapes of scales. of course this only works if you have the fretboard memorized, but once you get that down its easy peasy
#3
really, the thing about playing music is unless a teacher or someone assigns work then all you have to do is practice... if you want to memorize key signigtures you can, or you can jsut remember what the A chord is and then sharpen all the notes for A Sharp.
#4
knowing all the key signatures is pretty important especially if you are looking to getting in to any kind of jazz or soloing for that matter in the case of an A# chord the spelling would be A sharp C double sharp E sharp you kinda wanna avoid using double sharps cause its wicked confusing so i would look at spelling chord enharmonically in this casue the a sharp chord sounds the same as a b flat this stuff is definitly something to memorize but it takes time and practice
#5
Memorising key sigs doesn't need to be as hard as it sounds - if you know C has no sharps or flats, and you know the order of sharps (Father Charles Goes Down And Ends Battle) and flats (Battle Ends And Down Goes Charles' Father) you can work them out pretty quickly.
#7
....my question was not about key signatures


i asked how i can work out in my head the notes for chords, through key signatures or what?


For example if i think of a F#9 chord how do i do that quickly in my head? I cant memorise every chord out there.
#8
tha comes from just knowing how the chords are built and knowing your intervals with f#9 you have F# A# C# G# its all built off of the intervals of that chord key signatures help with know the quality of the chord within a certain key which would change the way they are spelt but just spelling the chord just comes from building the intervals and eventually you wont have to think about the inervals you just know what is what
#9
Quote by mafman719
tha comes from just knowing how the chords are built and knowing your intervals with f#9 you have F# A# C# G# its all built off of the intervals of that chord key signatures help with know the quality of the chord within a certain key which would change the way they are spelt but just spelling the chord just comes from building the intervals and eventually you wont have to think about the inervals you just know what is what



im not sure what you are saying here


...but anyway i understand intervals, perfect 5ths etc, but even those are dependent on the key signature right? so do i think to myself:-

Gm7

Circle of Fifths>key of G>G has only one sharp which is F# so G 1st Bb flattened 3rd D 5th 7th Fsharp (because of the key sig)??
Last edited by Sir-Shredalot at Oct 27, 2009,
#10
im just getting into this stuff but what i've found works for me is to take the root and then just count up two whole steps (havent found a shortcut for the third) then the fith, just use the circle or whatever mnemonic you've got for the fiths. then just the seventh is a half-step lower than the root, so A# would be A. theres probably a faster way though.
#11
what i was saying is exactly what you said but you just have to keep your keys straight because in the example you gave a gm7 is g b flat d f because for a minor chord you would look at the corresponding minor key that said there are a lot of different chord symbols the signify different things like when i see G7 i see it as G B D F because this symbol represents a major G chord with a minor 7th on top of that chord so i guess the thing to do would be take what you are doing with the key signatures and apply that to the many chord symbols that are out there
#12
Honestly, if you really want to do this the easiest way, do the following:

1. Memorize the scales, or at the very least their intervals so you can write them out on demand.
2. Memorize/keep a list of chord formulas handy. With Gm7, for example, the formula is 1 b3 5 b7 -- a minor seventh chord has a flatted third and seventh.
3. ????
4. PROFIT!

Three random chords off the top of my head... G7, BMaj9, Cdim.

G7
G Major scale: G A B C D E F#
Dominant 7th formula: 1 3 5 b7
1/root: G
3: B
5: D
b7: F

Therefore, the notes in a G7 chord: G, B, D, F


BMaj9
B Major scale: B C# D# E F# G# A#
Major Ninth formula: 1 3 5 7 9
1/root: B
3: D#
5: F#
7: A#
9: C# (the ninth is the second degree an octave higher)

Therefore, the notes in a BMaj9 chord are: B, D#, F#, A#, and C#.


Cdim
C Major scale: C D E F G A B
Diminished formula: 1 b3 b5
1: C
b3: Eb/D#
b5: Gb/F#

And so the notes in a Cdim chord are C, Eb, and Gb.


Sure, you'll have to figure it out on paper for a while, I'm sure. It's inevitable. But once the scales start to become second nature, you can just go through your formula (e.g. 1 3 5) and "fill in the blanks", basically.

I hope I'm not just being obvious... probably am though. :P
Last edited by freakstylez at Oct 27, 2009,
#13
Quote by Way Cool JR.
i had to string it got that done good but i noticed i raped the strings the wrong way on the machine heads the head is reversed from the other guitars i have had is this going to screw up my neck i dont want to screw up my new guitar

Buy new strings and wrap them the right way.
Check out this video if you don't know how
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=7685601180313742109
#14
The method I use is an awesome trick my music teacher taught us:

13579etc.
ACEGBDF min
BDFACEG dim
CEGBDFA maj
DFACEGB min
EGBDFAC min
FACEGBD maj
GBDFACE maj

Basically, the first three notes make up the basic chord if it's in C Major. Then each following note adds to it a 7th, 9th, 11th, etc. tone. For different keys, apply sharps and flats, which will change the quality of the chord, of course. Or, if you're just trying to figure out, say, Amaj, then since you know if all the notes are natural (ACE) the chord is minor, just raise the third a half-step (AC#E).

Hope this helps!
#15
another way to see it...

write the scale out...and choose every OTHER note to see the notes in a given chord

key of C

C D E F G A B C
1.....3....5....7-------C Maj 7
....1....3....5.....7-----D mi 7

now finish the scale

that type of thing...same formula in every key

play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Dec 3, 2009,
#16
Learn the chromatic scale. Learn what intervals are in each chord quality. Remember that you must spell the chord so that it contains the correct intervals, and not the equivalent enharmonic intervals (A♯ = A♯ CX E♯; A♯ =/= A♯ D F). Then just count from the root to the necessary intervals. After time, you'll get experienced and won't really need to think (Just like we all know our times tables very well after struggling to learn them in grade three).