#1
The interval is the building block, so let's learn on!

They follow a predictable pattern, with a little bit of zaniness in the middle:

From the note A:

(1)
A to A Unison
A to Bb minor 2nd
A to B Major 2nd
A to C minor 3rd
A to C# Major 3rd
A to D Perfect 4th
A to Eb Diminished 5th (Also known as a Flatted 5th)
A to E Perfect 5th
A to F minor 6th
A to F# Major 6th
A to G minor 7th
A to G# Major 7th
A to A Octave

A pattern emerges: minor, Major, minor, Major. Except for the Perfect-Diminished-Perfect sequence around the 4th, flatted 5th, and 5th, everything is minor, Major, minor, Major.

Once we reach the note 12 half steps higher than we started, we end up with the Octave. Oct means “eight,” and if we were counting scale tones, we would arrive at the same letter every eight notes: Check it out:


(2)
The A Major Scale:

A B C# D E F# G A

A is the 1st, and 8th, letter of our sequence. That's where the “oct” comes from. (Just ask any octagonally shaped octopus.)

Here's a chart of what the intervals look like on the guitar.

By the way, if you play the notes individually, as written, they would be Melodic intervals, and simultaneously they would be harmonic intervals. (By the way, don't worry too much about this “red tape” if it doesn't make sense. It's a classification, and not something to be overly concerned with at this point.)

Applications, And Homework

Now that you've got the sound and feel of the intervals under your hands, let's do something with them.

First off, recognize that the examples just given were from A, but can be from any note.

Secondly, yes, you have to memorize the names and how to play them. The shapes vary slightly depending on which string you're on (the shapes from the 3rd and 2nd strings are slightly different.) Yet another reason to learn the notes on your guitar! You'll get it, don't worry.

Next, we want to be able to see these, but more importantly, we want to be able to hear the different intervals. I highly recommend Ricci Adams' website for this. The free interval ear trainer is awesome. Use it. Yes, SIR! I vow to educate myself, and better my ear. I will try the interval ear trainer.

(And don't have your guitar anywhere nearby! Just you and your ear.)

And if you get confused with the ear trainer, check out the guide I wrote on my Blog.

So what are intervals used for? To build chords and scales, for starters! A major chord is built from harmonic intervals (notes played at the same time.) A Major 3rd plus a minor 3rd, to be exact.

A scale is built from a series of melodic intervals (Intervals played one after another.)

We'll cover chord construction in the next lesson, so hang tough. And yes, scales will be addressed as well. Fear not, fearless ones!

While you're waiting, and want to add some scary sounds to your playing, try experimenting with the minor 2nd and diminished 5th intervals. Spooky, indeed. Especially that diminished 5th.



Okay, I'm kinda having a problem with all of that above. I've bolded the parts and added number so it might be easier for people to help me.
So starting with 1, What exactly are the being used with? He says the A so I'm assuming it's the Open Astring? Also, how do you apply this? I mean, if you played the open A string and then say the 10th fret on the A string it would be a Minor 7?
And I'm assuming also that when it says Bb you can also say A# and the same for Eb and say D#?

And part 2. Now, This part I could just be wrong because well the little diagram thing that is posted simply is to small for me and I'm can't seem to find another example. (Feel free to post one. )
But this also has something to do with Scales. How do I read them?
"The A Major Scale: A B C# D E F# G A" I'm trying to learn scales of Chord book but this got me confused cause well, I simply just don't understand it. How would these look on a Scale?

Well, obviously as you people who actually read this can tell I'm awfully confused so please if you know anything that could help please let me know.
I'm new to this board so please forgive me if I'm making this thread in the wrong place.

Also, the Scale I'm looking at is here http://www.chordbook.com/guitarscales.php I'm not quite sure if it'll display the one I'm asking about but it's Amaj scale.
And a link to the theory part I'm talking about incase anyone wants/needs it:
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_2_intervals.html
#2
Part 1: Yes to every thing there. However, each fret/note is a "semi-tone" or half note, I presume they're called notes in this for simplicity. Oh, and you can of course start from any A on the fretboard as it all repeats.
As for part 2, I'm not entirely sure what you're asking, but I'll give it a go. If you can think of each fret on the uitar as each note in your list of intervals. Then you just need to pick out the ones in the major scale and then you'll know which frets to hold.
A to A Unison (0)
A to Bb minor 2nd
A to B Major 2nd (2)
A to C minor 3rd
A to C# Major 3rd (4)
A to D Perfect 4th (5)
A to Eb Diminished 5th (Also known as a Flatted 5th)
A to E Perfect 5th (7)
A to F minor 6th
A to F# Major 6th (9)
A to G minor 7th
A to G# Major 7th (11)
A to A Octave (12)

Hope that helps. Good luck.
When altitude dropping, my ears started popping. One more red nightmare...
#3
(1) Bb is 1 semitone after A(open string). B is 2 semitones(one whole tone) after A. C is 3 and so on. Semitones translate to spaces/frets: Bb is 1 fret after A(open string), B is 2 frets, C is 3...

(2) The A major scale:
A <2 semitones(frets) apart> B <2 frets> C# <1 fret> D <2> E <2> F# <2> G <1> A
so it's 2,2,1,2,2,2,1. that applies to any major scale.
#4
Quote by rednightmare
Part 1: Yes to every thing there. However, each fret/note is a "semi-tone" or half note, I presume they're called notes in this for simplicity. Oh, and you can of course start from any A on the fretboard as it all repeats.
As for part 2, I'm not entirely sure what you're asking, but I'll give it a go. If you can think of each fret on the uitar as each note in your list of intervals. Then you just need to pick out the ones in the major scale and then you'll know which frets to hold.
A to A Unison (0)
A to Bb minor 2nd
A to B Major 2nd (2)
A to C minor 3rd
A to C# Major 3rd (4)
A to D Perfect 4th (5)
A to Eb Diminished 5th (Also known as a Flatted 5th)
A to E Perfect 5th (7)
A to F minor 6th
A to F# Major 6th (9)
A to G minor 7th
A to G# Major 7th (11)
A to A Octave (12)

Hope that helps. Good luck.


To be honest I'm not even quite sure what I'm asking about the 2nd part either. It's all just so confusing to me.
How ever, I do believe I'm under standing the first part. I have a question if you don't mind anwsering (or anyone else reading this)
From the Problem 1 I used the little example he uses and wrote to of my own.
Can anyone tell me if I wrote it correctly?

C to C Unison
C to Db minor 2nd
C to D Major 2nd
C to Eb minor 3rd
C to E Major 3rd
C to F Perfect 4th
C to F# Dimineshed 5th
C to G Perfect 5th
C to G# Major 6th
C to A minor 6th
C to A# Major 7th
C to B minor 7th
C to C Octave

E to E Unison
E to F minor 2nd
E to F# Major 2nd
E to G minor 3rd
E to G# major 3rd
E to A Perfect 4th
E to A# Diminished 5th
E to B Perfect 5th
E to C major 6th
E to C# minor 6th
E to D major 7th
E to D# minor 7th
E to E Octave
#5
Quote by malephik
(1) Bb is 1 semitone after A(open string). B is 2 semitones(one whole tone) after A. C is 3 and so on. Semitones translate to spaces/frets: Bb is 1 fret after A(open string), B is 2 frets, C is 3...

(2) The A major scale:
A <2 semitones(frets) apart> B <2 frets> C# <1 fret> D <2> E <2> F# <2> G <1> A
so it's 2,2,1,2,2,2,1. that applies to any major scale.

So a Semi tone is what is after and before a whole note?
I know it's not called a whole note but I'm gonna use that in this example so I don't get confused.
So one the E string it would be Open E(w), F(w), F#(s), G(w), G#(s), A(w), A#(s) and so on? (w) meaning whole note and (s) meaning semi.
#6
Quote by frets192
To be honest I'm not even quite sure what I'm asking about the 2nd part either. It's all just so confusing to me.
How ever, I do believe I'm under standing the first part. I have a question if you don't mind anwsering (or anyone else reading this)
From the Problem 1 I used the little example he uses and wrote to of my own.
Can anyone tell me if I wrote it correctly?

C to C Unison
C to Db minor 2nd
C to D Major 2nd
C to Eb minor 3rd
C to E Major 3rd
C to F Perfect 4th
C to F# Dimineshed 5th
C to G Perfect 5th
C to G# Major 6th
C to A minor 6th
C to A# Major 7th
C to B minor 7th
C to C Octave

E to E Unison
E to F minor 2nd
E to F# Major 2nd
E to G minor 3rd
E to G# major 3rd
E to A Perfect 4th
E to A# Diminished 5th
E to B Perfect 5th
E to C major 6th
E to C# minor 6th
E to D major 7th
E to D# minor 7th
E to E Octave



I'm not sure what your asking. However this is the correct order of the inverval names:

C to C Unison
C to Db minor 2nd
C to D Major 2nd
C to Eb minor 3rd
C to E Major 3rd
C to F Perfect 4th
C to F# Tritone (it could be called augment 4th or diminished 5th but this is the most common name for it)
C to G Perfect 5th
C to G# minor 6th
C to A Major 6th
C to A# minor 7th
C to B Major 7th
C to C Octave

What exactly is your 2nd question TS?

*edit*

Quote by frets192
So a Semi tone is what is after and before a whole note?
I know it's not called a whole note but I'm gonna use that in this example so I don't get confused.
So one the E string it would be Open E(w), F(w), F#(s), G(w), G#(s), A(w), A#(s) and so on? (w) meaning whole note and (s) meaning semi.


A whole note is a note that has 4 beats in standard music notation (sheet music)

Those w and s mean Whole tone or Semi-tone.

1 whole tone is made up of 2 semi-tones.
Last edited by Guitarfreak777 at Oct 29, 2009,
#7
Quote by Guitarfreak777
I'm not sure what your asking. However this is the correct order of the inverval names:

C to C Unison
C to Db minor 2nd
C to D Major 2nd
C to Eb minor 3rd
C to E Major 3rd
C to F Perfect 4th
C to F# Tritone (it could be called augment 4th or diminished 5th but this is the most common name for it)
C to G Perfect 5th
C to G# minor 6th
C to A Major 6th
C to A# minor 7th
C to B Major 7th
C to C Octave

What exactly is your 2nd question TS?

*edit*


A whole note is a note that has 4 beats in standard music notation (sheet music)

Those w and s mean Whole tone or Semi-tone.

1 whole tone is made up of 2 semi-tones.



I did it kinda correct though, right? All right other then the tritone thing?

So wait, What are to semitones than?
#8
Quote by frets192
I did it kinda correct though, right? All right other then the tritone thing?

So wait, What are to semitones than?


you mean to as in 2?

Well you could call it as you did but tritone is understood as that interval.

Also you had it right except for the 6ths and 7ths you accidently switched the order.

Should minor major, not major minor.