#1
Hi, I wanted to know if there is anything such as a Finnish/Baltic/Scandinavian scale or scales out there or a scale that Finnish/Baltic/Scandinavian Folk musicians use a lot? Tabs or a link would be much appreciated.

Thanks a lot.
#2
couldnt really find anything. i doubt that the Norse ever really had their own traditional scales, but they were influenced by the Greeks and Romans pretty early on. so you can look up some old Greek scales. the trick to playing medieval folkish type songs is having a melody with a running stepwise motion, mainly using 8th notes or 16th notes. compound time signatures and triplets were also very common. i tried finding stuff on the Sami people, who i guess were some of the earliest settlers of Scandanavia, but they dont have any scales.
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#3
Give us some examples of what you mean and we can then tell you "scales don't make music they merely provide an explanation of what sounds good etc."

From what limited experience i always think of scandinavian traditional music as quite viking and therefore quite rhythmic (for rowing) and quite noisy (for drunkenness). Sorry to offend anyone, but i guess this is what comes from studying the vikings in primary school and having sing-a-longs to songs which went "ROW ROW, we are the vikings, ROW ROW, we come from northern lands"

Why particularly are you looking for Scandinavian folk sounds? it's quite specific and yet random.
#4
A huge amount of traditional folk music from all over the world is based on the pentatonic major and minor scales, so it's likely to be the same for Scandanavian folk music.
#5
yeah they're called major and minor scales. they're used in pretty much every other kind of music too.
#6
Quote by doive
Give us some examples of what you mean and we can then tell you "scales don't make music they merely provide an explanation of what sounds good etc."

From what limited experience i always think of scandinavian traditional music as quite viking and therefore quite rhythmic (for rowing) and quite noisy (for drunkenness). Sorry to offend anyone, but i guess this is what comes from studying the vikings in primary school and having sing-a-longs to songs which went "ROW ROW, we are the vikings, ROW ROW, we come from northern lands"

Why particularly are you looking for Scandinavian folk sounds? it's quite specific and yet random.

It's quite popular in the metal idiom nowadays.
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#7
Well, in sweden, except for a plethora of pieces in standard major scale, minor scale with major 6th, major 7th or both are quite commonly used. Also kinda noteworthy is that in some piece the 6th is never even touched.

However, if you´re after a typical folk metal sound, you´ll probably have more success with natural minor, without any major 6th or 7th.


Wrote down two songs I know as examples, could write some more down if you want.

EDIT: naturally all songs don´t stick to a single scale, but most of the shorter ones do.
Attachments:
swedish folk songs.zip
Last edited by descara at Oct 29, 2009,
#8
Normal minor and major scales (Aeolian & Ionian), harmonic minor and the Dorian and Myxolydian modes are the most common in Scandinavia and Finland. These scales are not unique to this region but it is the way they are played that makes them sound unique. A song in part harmonic minor going into major will sound the most Swedish you have ever heard, that is if you phrase it the right way with the right feel. Occasional sharps and flats as well as mixing the scales at the same are ways to go too.

Pentachord scales are found in Finnish kalevala music.
#9
I'm sure TS has figured out the answer in 6 years...
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