#1
Hi,

Ive got a question about improvising over a bleus progression.
If i play over a minor bleus progression that is in a minor i play in the a minor bleus scale.
I play this over all the chords, so also over the e minor chord and d minor.
Is this correct? I know i can do this when i do not play the bleus scale but how does this work when im playing in the bleus scale? does the scale you solo in change per chord?

And my other question is if i play in c major bleus can i then play the same scale as i did in the a minor bleus? i know a is the relative minor of c but is it the same rule in bleus ?

Thanks in advance
Erik
#2
If you are playing over an A minor Blues progression, you can use the A minor blues scale over the whole thing - you don't have to change scales for different chords.

You can't use A minor blues over a C Major progression though - but C Major and A minor share the same notes, so you can use the same notes, but most of your licks will be different as they will be resolving to a different root. If you play an A minor lick over a C Major progression it will generally sound unfinished and a bit odd, because its resolving to A instead of C.
#3
Question #1: No, the key does not change in the middle of a standard blues rhythm, stay in Am

Question #2: ^Actually you're right

P.S: It is the same in all music ever
No means maybe
Last edited by pilgrimevan at Oct 30, 2009,
#5
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
Bleus?
Maybe he's French?
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#6
Just a quick question guys. How important is it to focus on learning blues licks. I've been doing a lot of improv blues lately using the minor pentatonic or dorian mode and it's sounding pretty good but I don't know any huge licks. I sort of just make my own. How important is it to learn? (I know it is just sort of a why?)
#8
Quote by thekidkid32
Just a quick question guys. How important is it to focus on learning blues licks. I've been doing a lot of improv blues lately using the minor pentatonic or dorian mode and it's sounding pretty good but I don't know any huge licks. I sort of just make my own. How important is it to learn? (I know it is just sort of a why?)


the blues is the base for most, if not all, of rock & jazz...a thorough knowledge of blues progressions and chords and their inversions will broaden you ability to play in and out of key, use chord substitutions, turnarounds and developer a harmonic sense that will carry over to all styles of music..

play well

wolf