#1
alright, so I remixed my song "Kalium" from my upcoming album about the apocalypse, and I think this is the best mix I've ever done :3

it's on my band's profile (see sig).

It's only half of the song, as the other half isn't finished yet, but I think it already sounds pretty rad.
You're gonna wanna listen to this, it's fucking epic.

I'm usually not one to blow my own horn, but this is (by my standards) an awesome mix.

c4c as always
#2
That song wouldn't play but all your other songs sound very similar.
Like the rhythm on the deep and apocalypse sound very similar but I love the vocals on the deep whos the singer you.
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Last edited by NY_FootBall49 at Oct 30, 2009,
#3
Well Kalium works fine for me
maybe you need to refresh the page. And yes it's me singing, but I don't see any similarties between The Deep and the Apocalypse, aside from the fact that they're both in Bb.
But you may be right, and I just can't tell because I wrote both of them
#4
i like it man. vox are nice. what would you cite as your main influences for that song? im thinking amorphis or anathema maybe? im looking for good bands that sound like that but i cant seem to find too many.

and, uh, could you rate my new track?


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#5
Main influences... eeerrr ...

I wasn't really trying to sound like anybody or have any particular style If anything, then Devin Townsend, but the only song I knew of his at the time I wrote this was "Bastard".
I'll rate your song right away

EDIT: and yeah, that's me singing.
Last edited by CoreysMonster at Oct 30, 2009,
#6
I just listened to Kalium and I loved the lead melody line was sweet.
AK-47. The very best there is. When you absolutely, positively got to kill every motherfucker in the room, accept no substitutes.

Quote by RU Experienced?
It's comical because you are clearly an average to below-average bear.
#7
Quote by NY_FootBall49
I just listened to Kalium and I loved the lead melody line was sweet.

thanks, that's what most people have said about the song. but the funny thing is, that lead is so stupidly simple, and I wrote it after having not slept for 48 hours, and yet people really like it (I do too, it totally makes the song)
#8
ack sorry wasnt trying to insult or pigeonhole your style. i meant to say kalium REMINDED me of music like amorphis or anathema.


7 String+ ERG Legion!!

LTD Snakebyte
Agile AL-727
ESP Horizon
Warmoth Swirled 7
Schecter C-1 Classic
Frankentele
Laney Ironheart 60w + Avatar Cab

#9
Sounds great, better than the last mix, its alot more punchy and has more dynamics. The lead guitar was a bit annoying at the beginning, too much gain in my opinion, but it fell right into place with the rest of the song. Much better than my song.

Thanks for the crit.
#10
It does sound quite professional, good work. However, I thought there was too much reverb on everything.
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#11
Like Sewe Dae said, too much reverb going on, it just kind of washes a lot of detail out. Vocals aren't upfront enough. They could also use a little bit of screaming for the chorus; that would provide a nice lift. Personally I think the width is a little excessive and you're not really making room for the bass (which is always hard when playing an 8-string guitar).

This is the kind of thing I'd love a crack at re-mixing. What DAW are you working in? Are you using your low cuts to clear headroom? Giving each rhythm guitar a mid-range bump of its own to allow for separation?
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Last edited by ebon00 at Nov 1, 2009,
#12
Nice..........but, I think the vocals need to be more up front in the mix.
Other then that, nice work!
#13
Quote by ebon00
Like Sewe Dae said, too much reverb going on, it just kind of washes a lot of detail out. Vocals aren't upfront enough. They could also use a little bit of screaming for the chorus; that would provide a nice lift. Personally I think the width is a little excessive and you're not really making room for the bass (which is always hard when playing an 8-string guitar).

This is the kind of thing I'd love a crack at re-mixing. What DAW are you working in? Are you using your low cuts to clear headroom? Giving each rhythm guitar a mid-range bump of its own to allow for separation?

I'm using Cubase SX3

and nope, I have no idea what those things are I'm just started recording and mixing 4 months ago. Care to elaborate?
#14
Quote by CoreysMonster
and nope, I have no idea what those things are I'm just started recording and mixing 4 months ago. Care to elaborate?


Low cuts are used to clear up the frequencies where you don't really have musical information. Use any 1-band shelving EQ, most of the time with a steep curve.

For a vocal pretty much everything under 100Hz is useless but there's still information down there that rob you of headroom (low-level rumbling caused by the mic stand and a few other things). So in order to save that headroom and leave more "space" for the mix (in a sense) you apply low cuts on pretty much everything. Drums you can cut somewhere between 60-90Hz depending on how much "oomph" you want from your kick. Bass you can cut at 50Hz or so, the same will usually be true of 7- or 8-string guitars.

Low cuts are especially useful on lead instruments where the bass frequencies, and most of the lower mids, generally don't matter much to the tone and removing them can allow the part to sit in the mix better because it's not taking up as much sonic real estate.

Since you love to use reverbs I'd suggest trying to clean those up a bit. The way it sounds now you have too much frequency range to the reverbs and bass and lower mids tend to become very cluttered if you try to add reverb. The easiest way around that is to have a BUS (or AUX) for your reverb and apply some restrictive EQ to the BUS after the reverb. Take out the lows and the topmost highs. Then when you blend the reverb in with the dry signal the effect won't dominate as much as it does in your mixes right now.

For the most part I'm against reverb on lead vocals because it almost always hinders the intelligibility of the lyrics which is usually an important part of the song. Short tempo-based delays can make the vocals fit better in the track and you can add just a hint of BUS reverb to bring the vocal a little into the mix. (Technically speaking reverb is just a lot of delays that mush together so using a delay just refines the idea a bit.)

If you'd like I'd love to try a remix of this song. If you can bounce the individual tracks as audio files (without any effects what so ever!!) and post them somewhere I'd gladly take a stab at it.
"If money is the root of all evil, I'd like to be a bad, bad man."

- Huey Lewis & the News
#15
that is the ****ing best advice I've ever recieved on this site, ebon.


I'll try that out as soon as I've finished cleaning up my HD (realised I only had 5 GB left and wondered why Cubase was lagging, moving crap to external)

and I'll have to re-record the vocals, I foolishly recorded the reverb in the original file, but I'll be able to do that tomorrow, and then I'll see if I can upload it someplace

kickass, man