#1
OK, so I've been screwing around with some weird tunings lately, and I came up with a custom tuning. From standard you drop the 6th string to A, raise the 4th E, raise the 3rd to G#, raise the 2nd to C, and drop the 1st to D. Here,

D
C
G#
E
A
A

I really like the way the 3 lowest strings get that low octave and fifth thing going, but i would like to get some advice on how to modify the top 3 strings to make more interesting chords and fingerings. Right now there are some interesting shapes I've come up with, but nothing worth keeping them in the current tuning. Any suggestions?
#2
if you made it:
D
B
G
E
A
A

you would have a g triad(I) in the top and and the A5(V) chord in the bottom. that could be sweet.
#3
Quote by JRKul393
if you made it:
D
B
G
E
A
A

you would have a g triad(I) in the top and and the A5(V) chord in the bottom. that could be sweet.


Thanks man, that sounds pretty nice. If you play this with cleans, it sounds really pretty

7--4--0--0-----
5--3--2--0-----
6--4--3--1-----
5--3--3--1-----
------------------
------------------
#5
Quote by JRKul393
if you made it:
D
B
G
E
A
A

you would have a g triad(I) in the top and and the A5(V) chord in the bottom. that could be sweet.


A is the ii of G, not the V.
#6
Quote by isaac_bandits
A is the ii of G, not the V.
oya, d is the V, my
bad

either way, if it sounds sweet, good deal
#7
Well i figured it like this. I use the bottom 3 strings (low A, A, and E) to make an A5 powerchord, with the low octave instead of the usual higher octave (which sounds totally kick ass). I also use the top 4 strings (E, G#, B, D) to make an Emajmin7, or the top 3 strings (G#, B, D) to make G#mb5. Correct me if I'm wrong. Anyways, if anyone has tried the tuning yet here are some shapes I've come up with that sound really good and (for the most part) are either really difficult or impossible to do in standard:

x5768x -- D B D G -- D6sus4

x5767x -- D B D Gb -- D6b4

x5765x -- D B D E -- D6sus2

xx5657 -- A D E A -- Asus4

xx5656 -- A D E G# -- Asus4maj7

xx5542 -- A C# D# E -- A(#4)

xx5544 -- A C# D# F# -- A6b5

I'm not sure how accurate my nomenclature is, so if anyone sees any mistakes or has simpler/more accurate names for any of these chords... feel free to correct me.
Last edited by canvasDude at Nov 1, 2009,
#8
Play in strumming pattern you prefer

---------------------------------------
9---5--7-----------------------------
9---5--7---7---7---------------------
7---3--5---7---7----------------------
-------------5---7-----------------------
--------------------------------------------
Turtles R awesome. dont agree? YOU GO TO HELL, YOU GO TO HELL AND YOU DIE!


PSN: Purple-munky

Gear...
Ion - acoustic guitar.
Cort KX1Q - i smashed it
Fender Super Champ XD 15w
Stagg G-310 - i smashed it.
#9
Quote by vinnie-watt5
Play in strumming pattern you prefer

---------------------------------------
9---5--7-----------------------------
9---5--7---7---7---------------------
7---3--5---7---7----------------------
-------------5---7-----------------------
--------------------------------------------


I assume you mean in my tuning? Btw, check out my last post (I fixed it up). There are some sweet chords/voicings there.
#10
Quote by canvasDude
Well i figured it like this. I use the bottom 3 strings (low A, A, and E) to make an A5 powerchord, with the low octave instead of the usual higher octave (which sounds totally kick ass). I also use the top 4 strings (E, G#, B, D) to make an Emajmin7, or the top 3 strings (G#, B, D) to make G#mb5. Correct me if I'm wrong. Anyways, if anyone has tried the tuning yet here are some shapes I've come up with that sound really good and (for the most part) are either really difficult or impossible to do in standard:

x5768x -- D B D G -- D6sus4 should be called G. 6/4 chords are just major second inverstion

x5767x -- D B D Gb -- D6b4 should be called Bm. Rename The G♭ as F♯ and it should be fairly obvious

x5765x -- D B D E -- D6sus2 should be called Bmadd11.

xx5657 -- A D E A -- Asus4

xx5656 -- A D E G# -- Asus4maj7 should be called Amaj7sus4. Typically suspensions are the last part of the chord name

xx5542 -- A C# D# E -- A(#4) should be called Aadd♯11. 4ths found in the same chord as a third are called elevenths (fourth plus octave)

xx5544 -- A C# D# F# -- A6b5 should be called D♯ø7.

I'm not sure how accurate my nomenclature is, so if anyone sees any mistakes or has simpler/more accurate names for any of these chords... feel free to correct me.


E G♯ B D is E7, and not typically called Emajmin7 even though that name makes sense too.
G♯ B D is G♯° and not typically called G♯m♭5 even though that name makes sense too.

I've added corrections to chord names where necessary in bold. You should try to name chords based on thirds and sevenths whenever possible. Remember that the lowest note isn't always the root. I'm sure one can play all of those chords in standard tuning.
#11
Quote by isaac_bandits
E G♯ B D is E7, and not typically called Emajmin7 even though that name makes sense too.
G♯ B D is G♯° and not typically called G♯m♭5 even though that name makes sense too.

I've added corrections to chord names where necessary in bold. You should try to name chords based on thirds and sevenths whenever possible. Remember that the lowest note isn't always the root. I'm sure one can play all of those chords in standard tuning.


Yeah, on a few of those (read most) I was rushing to have time to write my history essay. But, for some reason I have this aversion to inversions (lol, no pun intended) b/c I just want ppl to understand what I'm trying to say as best they can. Although this ultimately leads to them not understanding as well. Also, while these chords can be played no problem in standard, the voicings I showed cannot (at least not as easily, although I haven't tried them all on my standard tuned acoustic yet). In any case, I hope as many people as possible are able to enjoy and experiment with this tuning as possible. It really lends itself well to jazz.

Btw, if you tune the 6th sting up to D (from A) it really opens up tons of 5 and 6 string chord possibilities. In fact, the bottom 3 strings would be tuned to a Dadd9 powerchord (I V IX or 1 5 9). Once again, enjoy (and if you guys write anything in this tuning and become famous, remember to pay me royalties )
#12
Quote by canvasDude
Yeah, on a few of those (read most) I was rushing to have time to write my history essay. But, for some reason I have this aversion to inversions (lol, no pun intended) b/c I just want ppl to understand what I'm trying to say as best they can. Although this ultimately leads to them not understanding as well. Also, while these chords can be played no problem in standard, the voicings I showed cannot (at least not as easily, although I haven't tried them all on my standard tuned acoustic yet). In any case, I hope as many people as possible are able to enjoy and experiment with this tuning as possible. It really lends itself well to jazz.

Btw, if you tune the 6th sting up to D (from A) it really opens up tons of 5 and 6 string chord possibilities. In fact, the bottom 3 strings would be tuned to a Dadd9 powerchord (I V IX or 1 5 9). Once again, enjoy (and if you guys write anything in this tuning and become famous, remember to pay me royalties )


Even if you are writing inversions, you wouldn't name them D6sus4 or anything like that. You only use the 6 and 6/4 in conjunction with roman numerals, and then the root note is the roman numeral. So the chord D G B would be a V6/4 in C major. If you want to name that, its just G, or in the case of no bassist, a G/D.

Also, you don't refer to the ninth as IX in music. While that is the correct roman numeral, roman numerals represent chords, and thus only go to vii. Scale degrees are written as numbers with carets on top (online the carets are omitted), and they only go up to 7. If your talking about chord tones, then you would use the ninth rather than the second, but it would be named 9 (with no caret).
#13
Quote by isaac_bandits
Even if you are writing inversions, you wouldn't name them D6sus4 or anything like that. You only use the 6 and 6/4 in conjunction with roman numerals, and then the root note is the roman numeral. So the chord D G B would be a V6/4 in C major. If you want to name that, its just G, or in the case of no bassist, a G/D.

Also, you don't refer to the ninth as IX in music. While that is the correct roman numeral, roman numerals represent chords, and thus only go to vii. Scale degrees are written as numbers with carets on top (online the carets are omitted), and they only go up to 7. If your talking about chord tones, then you would use the ninth rather than the second, but it would be named 9 (with no caret).


^^ this guys knows his stuff.
#14
Yeah I know about degrees and stuff, I just wasn't sure about whether you should use numbers or roman numerals. I guess while I have a pretty fair grasp of theory (I was declined a spot in theory class b/c I was too far ahead {to be fair it was only 9th grade theory}), I'm not well versed in proper... etiquette? For instance, I'm not always sure when an inversion is more appropriate than using the bass note as the root. Or, as stated above, whether or not to use Roman numerals for scale degrees. If you know of any articles discussing proper theory "etiquette" so to speak, I would definitely appreciate any links.
#15
Quote by canvasDude
Yeah I know about degrees and stuff, I just wasn't sure about whether you should use numbers or roman numerals. I guess while I have a pretty fair grasp of theory (I was declined a spot in theory class b/c I was too far ahead {to be fair it was only 9th grade theory}), I'm not well versed in proper... etiquette? For instance, I'm not always sure when an inversion is more appropriate than using the bass note as the root. Or, as stated above, whether or not to use Roman numerals for scale degrees. If you know of any articles discussing proper theory "etiquette" so to speak, I would definitely appreciate any links.


There aren't articles describing "etiquette" in pertinence to music theory.

As for when to use an inversion, and when to use the bass note as the root: Always bass your chord off stacked thirds. Typically, look for any third intervals, and then you'll almost always find multiple, and often stacks. The bottom note of these stacks is usually the root. Often times extended chords are missing the fifth, which in that case there will be a stack of thirds, with one interval being a fifth (two thirds). I'd recommend the 'name that chord' thread to practice naming chords (or just reading other peoples' analysis there).
#16
Quote by isaac_bandits
There aren't articles describing "etiquette" in pertinence to music theory.

As for when to use an inversion, and when to use the bass note as the root: Always bass your chord off stacked thirds. Typically, look for any third intervals, and then you'll almost always find multiple, and often stacks. The bottom note of these stacks is usually the root. Often times extended chords are missing the fifth, which in that case there will be a stack of thirds, with one interval being a fifth (two thirds). I'd recommend the 'name that chord' thread to practice naming chords (or just reading other peoples' analysis there).


Thanks, I'll definitely check into that. I definitely understand the different chord structures, intervals, etc.; but I'm just not always sure as to whether or not the name I've figured out for a chord is appropriate or if it could be simplified through inversion. Hopefully this will help. Thanks man
#17
Quote by canvasDude
Thanks, I'll definitely check into that. I definitely understand the different chord structures, intervals, etc.; but I'm just not always sure as to whether or not the name I've figured out for a chord is appropriate or if it could be simplified through inversion. Hopefully this will help. Thanks man


If you're not sure, then try naming it with every chord tone in the bass. This will tell you all of the names, and its generally fairly easy afterwards to determine which is the most elegant. It also has the benefit of just giving you lots more practice at what interval apart any two notes are, and should help you make connections all over the place between chords and intervals.

Generally, the best thing to do is to play the chord, and then hear what note is the root, and what the chord quality is. Ultimately music is about the sound rather than whatever else, so trust your ear more than anything.
#18
Quote by isaac_bandits
If you're not sure, then try naming it with every chord tone in the bass. This will tell you all of the names, and its generally fairly easy afterwards to determine which is the most elegant. It also has the benefit of just giving you lots more practice at what interval apart any two notes are, and should help you make connections all over the place between chords and intervals.

Generally, the best thing to do is to play the chord, and then hear what note is the root, and what the chord quality is. Ultimately music is about the sound rather than whatever else, so trust your ear more than anything.


How do you hear what note is the root? Oh and I read a thread about stacking thirds to construct triads and seventh chords that really helped me understand the structure of chords rather than just intervals and names. Kinda neat really, never really thought about as stacking intervals.
#19
Quote by canvasDude
How do you hear what note is the root? Oh and I read a thread about stacking thirds to construct triads and seventh chords that really helped me understand the structure of chords rather than just intervals and names. Kinda neat really, never really thought about as stacking intervals.


Play the chord, and listen. It should be the note that sounds like the most important, I guess. You can't really explain it, you just hear it.

Try playing a downward arpeggio, like this C G E D♭, and you should hear very easily that the C(which is the root) is a much better root note for that chord than the D♭.