#2
2x0232, i believe? A D with an F# on the bottom? i could be wrong but i think that's it
#3
It means that F# is played as the root of the chord rather than the D. The way it is on there is confusing because it looks like they're 2 different chords when it's just one. It's played with the D shape on the first 4 strings, muted A, and 2nd fret on the low E.

EDIT: ^^^^ got it right
#5
Sweet you guys are awesome! Thanks so much!

I still don't really understand the concept of X / Y notes, really -_-
You just replace the Y note base with the X note's base?
#6
Quote by Rizzice
Sweet you guys are awesome! Thanks so much!

I still don't really understand the concept of X / Y notes, really -_-
You just replace the Y note base with the X note's base?


Basically, if you know any music theory about chords, it'd be a second inversion D chord. A D triad consists of D F# and A. In a normal D triad the D is the root note played in the bass, but in a second inversion, the F# is played in the bass.

I'm probablly confusing you more than helping, it's not the easiest thing to explain lol
Last edited by skomskom at Oct 31, 2009,
#7
Ugh, I wish I knew more about music theory. Any suggestions in how I can educate myself in the matter?
#8
If you're still in school, many colleges/high schools offer music theory courses, though they may not be specifically targeted at guitar they still are very helpful for an overall knowledge. If that's not an option there's articles on UG called The Crusade that goes over most of the basics.

This is the first one: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/the_crusade_part_i.html
#9
Thanks skomskom! This is definitely something I'll be reading over the next few days~
#10
I'm pretty sure you're all referring to a D/F# chord actually. You would read that as "D OVER F#," which implies that the F# is played UNDER the D chord. F#/D would be an F# chord with a D as the bottom note. I think it could be called an F#addm6, but I'm not good with naming chord extensions like that, so that part could be wrong.

F#/D

e--------
B---2---
G---3---
D---4---
A---5-----
E----------


EDIT: Looking at the tab, I see that it supposed to say D/F#. so the fingering there is correct, but the name isn't.

D/F#

e---2----
B---3----
G---2----
D---0----
A---x----
E---2-----
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Last edited by TasianSensation at Oct 31, 2009,
#12
If you do play the open A string, it becomes a Dmaj first inversion. Slightly (But importantly and distinctly) different than a D/F#
#13
Quote by Baby Joel
If you do play the open A string, it becomes a Dmaj first inversion. Slightly (But importantly and distinctly) different than a D/F#


Not really, the lowest note is still F# and the rest of the notes still make up a D triad so it's still a D/F#.
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#14
But then it's an inversion, not a D root F#. It doesn't really matter, but if you really want to get down to the heart of theory, then you can't play that A for a D/F#.