#1
I am learning about tetrachords like CDEF.
How are they notated?
Is it possible to use them in harmonies or is it too dissonant to play all the notes at once.
What is the term for the chords that construct a scale?
eg) CDEF + GABC =CDEFGABC.
Where do tetrachords fit into the scheme of C Em G Bdim Dm F Am C?
If there are tetrachords are there trichords and pentachords? What about a tritone chord?
#2
No, a tetrachord is just playing the first five notes of a scale. It doesn't fit really into a chord progression when played harmonically.
breaking hearts
&
breaking guitars
#3
Quote by Kevy Absolution
No, a tetrachord is just playing the first five notes of a scale. It doesn't fit really into a chord progression when played harmonically.

oh really? ive never heard that term, thanks for tellin me that ;D i must have gotten confused, just based it off of what i thought. ill delete my post since it makes to sense now xD
Schecter C-1 Classic in Seethru blue <333
Schecter Damien FR
Roland AC-60 acoustic amp
Boss GE-7 EQ
Line6 Ubermetal Distortion
Sigma Dx Acoustic
#4
Quote by Kevy Absolution
No, a tetrachord is just playing the first five notes of a scale. It doesn't fit really into a chord progression when played harmonically.
Four. Tetra means four. I don't know if that was a typo or not.

Anyway, we had an awesome arrangement of "Seven Bridges Road" by the Eagles in the choir I'm in at school, and during the "sometimes there's a part of me" part, there were some really out there harmonies, which contributed to making an awesome song even cooler than it was to begin with. To make a long story short, there was a harmonic tetrachord right after the second line in that section, and it was the coolest (as well as hardest) thing to sing because it really comes out of nowhere. I think we did the song in B, so the tetrachord was B C# D# E, or something along those lines. I don't have the music with me, but the next time I take a look at it I'll get back to you about that.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#5
You don't play a tetrachord like a chord, they are basically building blocks for scales. You combine two tetrachords to create a scale/mode from tonic to tonic one octave higher.
#6
^what the guy above me said

the are usually used during fast key changes (coltrane changes for example) because they allow you to play something that is harmonically well-defined in a short space of time.

edit:
a good way to practice them is to play the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 5th notes of a parental scale in different fingerings; 1-2-3-5, 1-3-2-5, 2-1-3-5, 5-1-2-3 etc. (there are 24 possible fingerings).

you can also build them so they can be played over major 7th chords etc starting from the 3rd or fifth degree (3-5-6-7, 5-6-7-9 etc). they are usually based around chord tones and can be constructed using some form of pentatonic scale.
Last edited by MapOfYourHead at Nov 1, 2009,