#1
So I'm now the bassist for a band and things are going pretty smoothly. Since they kicked their old bassist out for not being into it and asked me to play I've learned all the songs even though they're above my skill level, I worked my ass off. The whole band has been for the past couple of weeks because we were supposed to have our first show tomorrow (didn't happen, but that's not the problem). That's just some background information on the band.

We have a guitarist who just joined who is a really good guitarist. The problem is he doesn't give a shit about the band and I don't think he really likes anybody else in the band. We feel like he's only in the band just to be in a band. At practice he complains how he wants to leave and it took him awhile to learn all the songs because he just wasn't there a lot. We'd love to have him if he was into the band because he's a great guitarist, but like I said before, it seems like he doesn't care. A couple of us want to kick him out because of this, but we don't know. The other guitarist who wrote everything doesn't want to go through the process of teaching another guitarist all our songs again, but it might be better for the band. Any advice?
I'm the same as I was when I was six years old
And oh my god I feel so damn old
I don't really feel anything
#2
Kick him.

If he doesn't care about the band and doesn't want to be in the band then its more that likely he's either gonna leave and/or bring you all down. By the sounds of it he's already bringing you down by not turning up to practices so get it sorted now and find a new guitarist.
"All I'm gonna do is just go on and do what I feel." - Jimi Hendrix


#3
Yea definitely get rid of him. Had a guy in my band, one of my best friends but he just didn't have the passion for playing shows, it caused a lot of stress for all of us and we decided to go on without him, he was mad, but he got over it and we had a good run for 4 or 5 months before disbanning due to scheduling conflicts and all that. We wouldn't have been able to play the shows we did or get our demo recorded had we kept him.

But I don't think a band can function if everyone isn't in to it. I'd much prefer a less skilled player that is in to the music than an amazing player that could care less.
#4
Ask him if this band is what he'd like to be doing, if not get rid of him now.
Oct. 20th, 2009: New guitar AND front row for Mars Volta.

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#5
Quote by StreetLight3989
We have a guitarist who just joined who is a really good guitarist. The problem is he doesn't give a shit about the band and I don't think he really likes anybody else in the band. We feel like he's only in the band just to be in a band. At practice he complains how he wants to leave and it took him awhile to learn all the songs because he just wasn't there a lot. We'd love to have him if he was into the band because he's a great guitarist, but like I said before, it seems like he doesn't care.
Unless this guy's attitude changes, he's a liability. No matter how talented he is, an attitude like that tends to rip a band apart.

Quote by StreetLight3989
A couple of us want to kick him out because of this, but we don't know.
Probably not your decision anyway. You can voice your opinion about this, privately to the bandleader. But be discrete. And kicking this guy isn't the first choice. Other possibilities must be tried, first.

Quote by StreetLight3989
The other guitarist who wrote everything doesn't want to go through the process of teaching another guitarist all our songs again, but it might be better for the band. Any advice?
I agree with this thinking. Accomplish the goals by making the fewest major changes possible. IF there's an attitude adjustment, the guy should stay. That makes life easier. But if the bandleader can't convince the guy to adjust his priorities, eventually he'll have to make a decision. Either have band that doesn't function well as a band or get a new guitarist.

Your role in all this:
1 - Bring the importance of this matter to the bandleader's attention.
2 - Support HIS decision on how to handle it, no matter what that decision is.
3 - Give the bandleader time to straighten it out.
4 - If the problem has been fixed, no worries.
5 - If after a reasonable amount of time the problem still exists, again bring it to the bandleader's attention.
6 - If all else fails, consider looking for a different band.
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Last edited by SomeoneYouKnew at Nov 1, 2009,
#6
I guess that's all I can do SYK, thanks. I mean most of us want him out but we want a solid backup plan first. It's not ultimately my decision but we need to have a talk as a band.
I'm the same as I was when I was six years old
And oh my god I feel so damn old
I don't really feel anything
#7
i'd say give him one last chance tell him if your don't start putting the effort in and turning up were gunna kick you out the band see if his reaction changes if not then i fully agree kick him out
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#8
and if all of that doesn't pan out, maybe it wouldn't be such a bad idea to just, you know, walk up behind him and say, "this isn't working out." chamber a round in your 1911 and *pop*... blow his brains through his forehead. problem solved.
#9
You really have to consider what you mean when you say "great guitarist".

A "great guitarist" would not have too much trouble learning new songs. When I join established original bands I will write out a chord chart for their songs and tape them during the first rehearsals if they haven't recorded themselves already. I don't really need to get someone to babysit me and teach me the songs - I already have a reference for what they sound like, and I'll work on my parts at home.

Unfortunately though, I can't sweep or shred, so that may take me out of the running for being a "great guitarist". However I'm a lot more practical and useful.

So does a "great guitarist" complain a lot and doesn't bother learning songs? Nope. But a bi-atch does.

Chat to him, if he doesn't change his actions, kick him. Also tape your songs so he can learn at home. Chord sheets are helpful etc.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#10
Quote by AlanHB
Unfortunately though, I can't sweep or shred, so that may take me out of the running for being a "great guitarist". However I'm a lot more practical and useful.


Not to be a dick at all, you give great advice on these forums, but yeah, not being able to "sweep or shred" does definitely take you out of the running for a great guitarist. Before I get beaten to death with "soulful" white teenage blues player's one-sided opinions -- this does not necessarily make you a bad songwriter. It does, without a doubt, make you a very limited player, which limits your songwriting.

Do people get carried away with having a lot of technique and being able to do things like sweep pick and play chromatics all in 16ths at 300 BPM? Absolutely, but saying that not being able to do these things won't benefit you is ridiculous. You could also argue that limiting your abilities makes what you do know forced to become more individual and unique, because if you can only play blues licks and power chords, you need to switch them up a helluva lot to keep people listening.

I could ramble on for hours. But what I'm trying to say is that, although you could put a good case for both sides, it's much more efficient to actually go the extra mile and be able to do ridiculous (what some would say unusable) fast licks or some crazy scale to spice things up, but don't get carried away with it. Find a balance, don't be an extremist either way.
Quote by AlanHB
As for the guitarist being a wanker - he's a guitarist. Get used to it.
#11
Quote by itstheman
Not to be a dick at all, you give great advice on these forums, but yeah, not being able to "sweep or shred" does definitely take you out of the running for a great guitarist. Before I get beaten to death with "soulful" white teenage blues player's one-sided opinions -- this does not necessarily make you a bad songwriter. It does, without a doubt, make you a very limited player, which limits your songwriting.


I agree with your view, but I would also say that Dave Gilmour and Mark Knopfler are great guitarists, despite the fact they cannot sweep or shred. Same would go for Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Slash etc. I can play their stuff, but I can't play much faster.

But that's really just a result of the types of bands I've been in. Not many bands actually call for the shredderific solo, so I never really explored the area

All personal opinions for sure.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#12
Quote by AlanHB
I agree with your view, but I would also say that Dave Gilmour and Mark Knopfler are great guitarists, despite the fact they cannot sweep or shred. Same would go for Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Slash etc. I can play their stuff, but I can't play much faster.


It's good to see you took my comment correctly (I've said things like that before to only be ripped on by someone misunderstanding). I'd say more they're great musicians. They make great work of very few notes. But as players, they're likely not much better then the average joe (at least nowadays.)
Quote by AlanHB
As for the guitarist being a wanker - he's a guitarist. Get used to it.
#13
Quote by itstheman
It's good to see you took my comment correctly (I've said things like that before to only be ripped on by someone misunderstanding). I'd say more they're great musicians. They make great work of very few notes. But as players, they're likely not much better then the average joe (at least nowadays.)


Nah mate it's cool - gotta be able to take criticism if you're a musician.

Edit: That said, I'd love to be able to play stuff like Paul Gilbert or Nuno Bettencourt. Although they can play incredibly fast, they always service the songs that they play in. Paul could have shredded all over "To Be With You" and Nuno could have done the same with "Song for Love", but they didn't.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#14
Quote by AlanHB
You really have to consider what you mean when you say "great guitarist".

Well he's not a "great guitarist", but he's very good. He learned the songs quickly and with no trouble, it just took a while because he was never at practice. I think we just need to discuss things.
I'm the same as I was when I was six years old
And oh my god I feel so damn old
I don't really feel anything
#15
sorry guys, but i disagree... seems to me the best option is still a bullet to the back of the head. atleast that way he can't go off and join some other band whose practices he would've shown up for... less competition = more gigs for you.