#1
So how easy would it be to put new LED's in a few of my pedals?

The lights in my BOSS pedals just aren't bright enough. Plus I just think it'd be cool to have a few different colored lights on my board.
Lots of pedals.
#2
easy if you know what you are doing. a bit difficult if you dont. as long as you orientate your led the right way so it lights up you should be fine since if you put it in backwards it wont light up.
#4
Quote by Skunk Force 9
The lights in my BOSS pedals just aren't bright enough.
LEDs use a resistor in series with them to drop the voltage from 9v down to 2-ish volts. This limits the current. Use a smaller resistor to make them brighter. Use a larger resistor to make them dimmer.

BUT. If you increase the current to make the LEDs brighter, this will decrease battery life. (not really an issue if you use a power supply instead of a battery)

Quote by Skunk Force 9
Plus I just think it'd be cool to have a few different colored lights on my board.
Just changing the LEDs probably won't make them any brighter with the same current. But if you want a colour change, then change the LEDs. Not too difficult if you can solder and have basic tool skills.
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
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#5
I've found blue ones work the best for visibility, I did the same with my DS1. There's a little circuit board with the LED mounted thats screwed to the pedal housing. Disassemble to get at this, make note of the LED orientation, desolder the old one out, solder in the new, clip the excess off the LEDs leads, reassemble.

Edit to add - Per the above post, I've found that blue LEDs just run brighter then the other colors, so in my case I didn't have to change resistor values.
Last edited by Poster_Nutbag at Nov 1, 2009,
#6
You can always search ebay for low consumption leds and find a tutorial to change them
#7
LEDs use a resistor in series with them to drop the voltage from 9v down to 2-ish volts. This limits the current. Use a smaller resistor to make them brighter. Use a larger resistor to make them dimmer.

BUT. If you increase the current to make the LEDs brighter, this will decrease battery life. (not really an issue if you use a power supply instead of a battery)


leds are also differ by mcd, so if one led have 5000mcd and other 25000mcd, so the second one would be brighter with the same resistor used and boss leds have i think about 1000mcd max, so change it, it's easy I've put 25000mcd blue led in my boss mt-2 and I love it too bad I'm selling it on ebay
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ESP Eclipse II ACSB SD Jazz/JB
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Benor 4x12 Celestion 12T-75
Last edited by ebuprofen at Nov 1, 2009,
#8
Quote by ebuprofen
leds are also differ by mcd, so if one led have 5000mcd and other 25000mcd, so the second one would be brighter with the same resistor used and boss leds have i think about 1000mcd max, so change it, it's easy I've put 25000mcd blue led in my bodd mt-2 and I love it too bad I'm selling it on ebay
Check your specs. I really doubt there would be 25x the output on an LED with the same current. Yes, there might be some differences in brightness (efficiency). But 25x seems unlikely.
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
I release my inner liberal every morning when I take a shit.
Quote by SK8RDUDE411
I wont be like those jerks who dedicate their beliefs to logic and reaosn.
#9
well, I didn't said that they would be 25 times brighter, I just said that they would be brighter and LEDs average forward current is 20-30mA (even if it's 25k mcd)and they need about 3V, so replacing the stock LED with LED that has greater mcd value would result in a brighter LED
My Band
ESP Eclipse II ACSB SD Jazz/JB
Bugera 6262 head
Benor 4x12 Celestion 12T-75