#1
Is there any particular strategy in getting a good sound for a backing tracks for certain scales/modes?
to be specific if i wanted to make a backing track for F lydian, in what ways would i change the chord progression to make it differ from C ionian?
#2
Quote by Themann810
Is there any particular strategy in getting a good sound for a backing tracks for certain scales/modes?
to be specific if i wanted to make a backing track for F lydian, in what ways would i change the chord progression to make it differ from C ionian?



Use the sharp 4 with a resolution to the natural 5. That is the Lydian tonality.
#3
Well, you need to make F the tonic and then add extensions to the chords so that it can only be percieved as Lydian, even though it's technically using the same notes... it's kinda hard to explain, so look around at the lessons on this site.
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#6
Quote by turtlewax
Well, you need to make F the tonic and then add extensions to the chords so that it can only be percieved as Lydian, even though it's technically using the same notes... it's kinda hard to explain, so look around at the lessons on this site.



so would this mean turning C into C7 for example (since we're in f lydian)

in other words are you using extensions using F as the 1 since i'm trying to achieve an f lydian progression
Last edited by Themann810 at Nov 1, 2009,
#7
Quote by MetalUpYourRear
Use the sharp 4 with a resolution to the natural 5. That is the Lydian tonality.



would this mean Bdim resolving to Cmaj?(again, since i'm using f lydian as an example)

or just Bmaj to Cmaj
or maybe Bmaj to Cdom

or none of these?
#8
Quote by Themann810
would this mean Bdim resolving to Cmaj?(again, since i'm using f lydian as an example)

or just Bmaj to Cmaj
or maybe Bmaj to Cdom

or none of these?


None. You don't want to make that #4 resolve to the 5, as that will just make it sound like C major having the 7 resolve to the one. You want to have the tonic chord for sure, and something to show the ♯4. You could use the vii chord (Em) and go between F and Em, or you could use the II chord (G) and go between F and G. You shouldn't use the ♯iv°, since its diminished and will want to resolve to the V, which will make it sound like C major.
#9
sorry, somewhat of a theory noob.
when you say resolve to the natural five, would that mean resolve to the V(G) of F lydians parent scale? (C major)
Last edited by Themann810 at Nov 1, 2009,
#10
Quote by Themann810
sorry, somewhat of a theory noob.
when you say resolve to the natural five, would that mean resolve to the V(G) of F lydians parent scale? (C major)


I meant scale degrees. So I meant resolving from the ♯4 (B) to the ♮5 (C). That doesn't refer to chords, and its typically not what you want to do in lydian, as that generally makes the V (C major) sound like the tonic chord.
#11
On top of what Isaac has said, you can change the F chords to something like Fmaj7 or Fmaj7#11 if you're looking for something more interesting.
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#12
Quote by isaac_bandits
I meant scale degrees. So I meant resolving from the ♯4 (B) to the ♮5 (C). That doesn't refer to chords, and its typically not what you want to do in lydian, as that generally makes the V (C major) sound like the tonic chord.


okay, this entire time i was thinking in chords, but yeah that makes sense now thankls.


if resolving from the #4 to natural 5 is the lydian tonallity, what are the other modes tonalities? if it's not too much trouble for anyone
#13
Quote by Themann810
okay, this entire time i was thinking in chords, but yeah that makes sense now thankls.


if resolving from the #4 to natural 5 is the lydian tonallity, what are the other modes tonalities? if it's not too much trouble for anyone


The ♯4 to ♮5 is not what you want to do for Lydian, as that turns out to just be a leading tone to tonic type progression in the relative Major. For each mode there is a 'colour tone' and a tonic, and then you have to make use of those, in a progression so that the tonic will sound like the tonic.

Colour tones:
Lydian: ♯4
Ionian: ♮4, ♮7
Mixolydian: ♭7
Dorian: ♮6
Aeolian: ♮2, ♭6
Phrygian: ♭2
Locrian: ♭5

Tonic chords:
Lydian: maj7
Ionian: maj7
Mixolydian: 7
Dorian: m7
Aeolian: m7
Phrygian: m7
Locrian: m7♭5
#14
thanks man that is very useful. are the tonic chords strictly maj7/min7/7/m7b5 or could you change these to 9ths to get a different color

sorry if i phrase questions poorly i tend to do that
#15
Quote by Themann810
thanks man that is very useful. are the tonic chords strictly maj7/min7/7/m7b5 or could you change these to 9ths to get a different color

sorry if i phrase questions poorly i tend to do that


You can extend them to ninths, elevenths and thirteenths if you want. You can also use suspensions, or just basic triads. Anything goes. The main things to keep in mind when making modal music is: Firstly, the song has to resolve to the note you want to be the tonic. Secondly, you only play scale tones, anything else will just make it sound like the parallel major or minor. In order to do these two things, you generally want to stay fairly simple, and exclude the tonic triads of the relative major and minor. You'll typically have a one or two chord vamp, and each chord generally has 3 or 4 tones. In the end it will come to what it sounds like. If it sounds like it resolves to that mode, great, if not, its not a problem, just it shouldn't be labelled modal.

Be very careful with the term modal, as almost all music isn't modal, even if you think you are playing "off the mode" or something like that.