#1
What strings are generally recommended? 0,09 or 0,10? Why?

I myself started playing many years ago, and i prefer 0,09. But preferences aside, what is usual recommended (especially for the novice)?
#2
I think 10's sound fuller, and make it easier to universally play guitar, considering there's a pretty even split between people playing 10's and 9's, you will have an easy time playing both if you play 10's but you can't play, say your friends guitar(who plays with 10's) as easily if you play 9's. I would say its a better move to play with 10's.
Last edited by Dio10101 at Nov 1, 2009,
#4
for a novce I would recomennd 9s
but it actually comes down to personell preference
on 25.5"" scale guitares I use 11s for D-tuning and I use the exact same strings for standard tuning on my 24.75" scaler
#5
Lighter strings = less tension, easier to bend
Heavier strings = more tension, harder to bend, but also slightly fuller tone

The tension also depends on the scale length of your guitar. If it's a fender-style 25.5 inches, they're typically strung with 9's. Les Pauls have a scale of 24.75 inches and are typically strung with 10's.

If you tune down below standard tuning, you'll need heavier strings so they don't end up feeling like rubber bands
#6
I prefer playing with 10's. I find that 9's can make a guitar feel cheap.
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#7
Quote by saiza
What strings are generally recommended? 0,09 or 0,10? Why?

I myself started playing many years ago, and i prefer 0,09. But preferences aside, what is usual recommended (especially for the novice)?

Theres more than 09 and 10's. Theres 08's,11's,12's,13's and on. I use 11's for a nice chunky sound.
Guitars:
Ibanez RG350EX
ESP/LTD EC400AT

Soon to have an Ibanez RG1550M, 350M, and RG2610!!
#8
First, thank you all for your reply. You have been very helpfull.
Just one question:

Quote by sashki


The tension also depends on the scale length of your guitar. If it's a fender-style 25.5 inches, they're typically strung with 9's. Les Pauls have a scale of 24.75 inches and are typically strung with 10's.



This is knew to me. But i'm thinking now, shouldn't a smaller scale have the thinner strings? And the bigger should have the thicker ones?

Is there some logic behind 0,09 on fender and 0,10 on Les paul, or is just a matter of "thats the way its always been done"?
#9
the longer scale length creates more tension therefore thinner strings will compensate to make it easier to play. But it really is just personal preference. I personally love stringing my strat up with 11s for standard tuning, but I also play an acoustic pretty often which keeps my finger strength up. I've had friends pick up my guitar and wonder how I do it, but anything else just feels weird to me.
#11
Quote by sashki
Lighter strings = less tension, easier to bend
Heavier strings = more tension, harder to bend, but also slightly fuller tone

The tension also depends on the scale length of your guitar. If it's a fender-style 25.5 inches, they're typically strung with 9's. Les Pauls have a scale of 24.75 inches and are typically strung with 10's.

If you tune down below standard tuning, you'll need heavier strings so they don't end up feeling like rubber bands

this.
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#12
Quote by saiza
First, thank you all for your reply. You have been very helpfull.
Just one question:


This is knew to me. But i'm thinking now, shouldn't a smaller scale have the thinner strings? And the bigger should have the thicker ones?

Is there some logic behind 0,09 on fender and 0,10 on Les paul, or is just a matter of "thats the way its always been done"?

longer neck = more tension. when a company ships out guitars from the factory, they use standard tension and standard strings for that tension and the standard tuning for that tension. thats why most guitars are always in E standard at a store. they received them like that.
Quote by pedromiles101
you're not gonna want to take a dump in a gross, off-colored, vintage toilet. you want something that is white and pearly; something that shines. something that you can put your cheeks against and say, "f*** yeah"
#13
Quote by saiza
First, thank you all for your reply. You have been very helpfull.
Just one question:

This is knew to me. But i'm thinking now, shouldn't a smaller scale have the thinner strings? And the bigger should have the thicker ones?

Is there some logic behind 0,09 on fender and 0,10 on Les paul, or is just a matter of "thats the way its always been done"?

Ok, consider this:

When you hold down a string at the first fret, you're shortening its length. This causes an rise in pitch. If you wanted a string to be shorter, but still produce the same pitch, you would have to reduce the tension.

The same could be said about a Les Paul's scale length when compared to a Fender's scale length. The pitch is the same, but the length is shorter, so less tension is required to get it up to pitch.
#14
I have been playing 9s (Super Slinkys) for years and years. I was thinking of restringing one of my guitars with 10s next time just to try it out. Do you think I need to adjust the truss rod?
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#15
Quote by paranoid70
I have been playing 9s (Super Slinkys) for years and years. I was thinking of restringing one of my guitars with 10s next time just to try it out. Do you think I need to adjust the truss rod?

not at all. it's going to be only a little bit of difference of tension on your neck the only thing that'll have to be adjusted is the action and intonation.
Quote by pedromiles101
you're not gonna want to take a dump in a gross, off-colored, vintage toilet. you want something that is white and pearly; something that shines. something that you can put your cheeks against and say, "f*** yeah"